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Author Topic: The real value of an image is what it means to a client  (Read 5593 times)
Ellis Vener
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« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2012, 11:55:40 AM »
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Quote from: Robert Roaldi

Thank you for the update.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
RFPhotography
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« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2012, 12:22:03 PM »
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Robert beat me to it.  Grin
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bill t.
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« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2012, 07:55:28 PM »
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Of course that could have a chilling effect on boudoir portraiture, an already chilly affair.  But I guess that would need a model release which still gives the commissioners of portraiture and bridal pictures a certain copyright-like power over the photographer.  I wonder how much of that $18K the bride got?
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Rob C
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« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2012, 03:06:40 AM »
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Of course that could have a chilling effect on boudoir portraiture, an already chilly affair.  But I guess that would need a model release which still gives the commissioners of portraiture and bridal pictures a certain copyright-like power over the photographer.  I wonder how much of that $18K the bride got?


I have earned my living as a photographer all my life – commercial clients – but I still wonder how I, as an individual, would feel had I commissioned a photographer to shoot for me, had paid him for his creative effort, and then later discovered he’d been using the work for which I’d already paid him, to supply the needs of another client.

Now there’s a certain logic to that within the commercial world because both sides are a little more aware of copyright issues – or they should be – but in the case of work commissioned by a civilian client, then I think that’s not the same thing; at the very least, there should be a standard, plain language form issued by all photographers taking on private clients telling them of the possibility of the products of their shoot being used elsewhere without any reference to them or their opinions on the matter.

It’s become a rather murky puddle and I don’t think it does anyone’s reputation or standing a lot of good.

Rob C

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RFPhotography
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« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2012, 06:31:54 AM »
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Did you read the entire thread, Rob?  The photographer obtained a release from the bride.  The image was not used without her permission.  There was no 'surprise'.  And she was paid for it. 

Simply put, legally, a release is required in the situation you describe.  Sure there would be some unscrupulous photographers who would try to do without it but they run the risk of serious legal trouble.  There's really nothing murky about it. 
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Yelhsa
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« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2012, 10:52:29 AM »
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Not sure about UK/Australia but it wouldn't surprise me if they had similar laws given their common origin.
The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, is the current UK copyright law.
http://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/uk_law_summary - which I believe is basically the same.
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MarkM
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« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2012, 01:57:50 PM »
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The real problem is that we have a forum with a bunch of photographers who look at this story and DON'T naturally say, "Of course he was paid $18k for this use." Maybe may of you don't really understand the true value of the right photo, the photo that is on message, the one that quickly connects to your branding efforts and stirs the exact emotional response you are looking for. A large company is going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions on a media buy for a campaign like this. The one central thing that has to be absolutely right is the photo. Getting the wrong photo and sending anything but the perfect message is a huge, expensive error. $18k is not that much money in the scheme of things.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #27 on: August 29, 2012, 08:03:03 PM »
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Mark: Bingo.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
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