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Author Topic: Everything that's Most Important in Photography I Learned from Classical Music  (Read 10699 times)
dreed
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« on: August 25, 2012, 06:26:59 AM »
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What an interesting read and what a contrast to the prior article. I'm almost given to wondering if the ordering of the essays like that is part of the art of this web site or if it is just happenstance.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 07:56:40 AM »
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What an interesting read and what a contrast to the prior article. I'm almost given to wondering if the ordering of the essays like that is part of the art of this web site or if it is just happenstance.
Very refreshing. He gives an incisive look at an important aspect of good photographs without making outrageous claims.
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stamper
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2012, 08:08:27 AM »
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I thought the connection far too tenuous. His observations on photography were fine and taken alone was sound advice. Therefore no need to connect the two. I wonder how many musicians will have in front of them photos instead of sheet music?
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opgr
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2012, 09:01:17 AM »
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I thought the connection far too tenuous. His observations on photography were fine and taken alone was sound advice. Therefore no need to connect the two. I wonder how many musicians will have in front of them photos instead of sheet music?

Huh

The writer simply states that he has learned from classical music, particular patterns and counterpoint. The images exemplify his point very well. Why your derogatory comment?

Somehow your comment reminds me of this, skip to 30min and 30sec:

Listening to Jimi Hendrix
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Oscar Rysdyk
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stamper
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2012, 10:41:44 AM »
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Which comment do you find derogatory? Is it the one about the musicians? I made it because it is the flip side of the coin imo.
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OldRoy
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2012, 11:03:49 AM »
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On reading this article I knew immediately that it would prove contentious. Perhaps it would have been less so if it had referred to "baroque music" rather than just "classical music" in general - a term that suffers from ambiguity.

Perhaps someone would like to contribute a parallel piece comparing photographic examples to the compositions of, let's say, Karlheinz Stockhausen. Or maybe some comparisons in the form of photographer/composer equivalents.
I'll start:
Ken Rockwell: Barry Manilow.
Roy
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2012, 11:07:01 AM »
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Alas - or hooray! - I can't make myself read articles with titles like the one referred to here; life's too short, and photography a world of its own that doesn't need reference to another discipline to make it what it is, or to allow it to be understood.

I have to make another quotation from the notes (as in letters!) of St AA.

To Alfred Steiglitz, El Paso, November 27, 1936 (and to think I didn't even exist at that point!):

"I can see only one thing to do - make the phoptography as clean, as decisive, and as honest as possible. It will find its own level."

Rob C

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opgr
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« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2012, 11:26:34 AM »
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Which comment do you find derogatory? Is it the one about the musicians? I made it because it is the flip side of the coin imo.

An implication doesn't have a flip side. (A common mistake btw on this forum as of late).

The author is not making a universal connection between the two. He simply describes what and how he learned from music, that he now applies to his photography. The examples make the point very clear.

If there is any parallel on the flip side, it may be that great music invokes beautiful images in the minds eye. In that respect a good musician should indeed have a photo in front of them. But again, I don't think the article was remotely suggesting anything to that effect.

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Oscar Rysdyk
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opgr
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« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2012, 11:38:35 AM »
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Alas - or hooray! - I can't make myself read articles with titles like the one referred to here;

Then why comment?
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Oscar Rysdyk
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2012, 01:19:45 PM »
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Then why comment?
+1.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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KLaban
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« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2012, 01:51:55 PM »
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Everything that's most important in photography isn't learned.
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Keith Reeder
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« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2012, 04:08:59 PM »
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Ah - I see that the "only comment if you agree with me" police are out in force...

Personally I found the article pretentious, contrived, and not remotely relevant to my photography - as Roy says, photography stands alone as a craft (and - maybe - an art) and it needs no explanation by cross-reference to another artistic medium.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 04:13:44 PM by Keith Reeder » Logged

Keith Reeder
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Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2012, 05:05:11 PM »
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Then why comment?


Why  not?

It's a valid reaction; think sideways as in crab: you'll discover that direct lines from A to B are seldom the most interesting. You do like things to be interesting, don't you?

And Keith's right. He's done it long enough and well enough to know of what he writes. The sad bloody truth is, of course, that there is precious little to learn in photography; it has to be the next most simple job to do after washing dishes. But boy, is there music to be made pretending otherwise!

Rob C
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LesPalenik
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« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2012, 08:08:57 PM »
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Almost like dancing.
Some photographers follow set and contrived steps like in a well-rehearsed rumba, then there are some passionate souls who express their emotions through a hot tango, and there are some who boogie through in their own frestyle, while most of the onloookers are still trying to figure out what's going on.

Fortunately, the dance floor is always watched and analyzed by some experts who are more than willing to bestow their critique and suggestions for improvement.
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Ray
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« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2012, 10:50:56 PM »
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I think part of the problem here is that Mark Schacter is making analogies more in line with classical music. Probably most readers of this site are more into pop and jazz.

Classical music, the music of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky etc, is much more detailed and complex than the average pop song. The range from loud to soft is much greater; the changes and interactions of themes and melodies is much greater; the variety of different musical sounds emanating from the greater number of different musical instruments is much greater, and the technical skill of those handling the equipment (the musical instruments) is usually much greater.

Call me elitist if you like, but you can't compare the pianistic skills of Elton John with those of Frederic Chopin.

I thought a recent photo of Michael's on the homepage was very inspiring because it reminded me of the subtlety one finds in Classical music. It's an image of a porter in China carrying a heavy load as he climbs up some steps, but he's hardly visible due to the heavy mist.

I liken that image to the soft passage in a piece of music which is so quiet one has to listen very carefully. Yet despite it being quiet, the music is so powerful.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2012, 11:10:43 PM »
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Very well put, Ray.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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Ray
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« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2012, 11:28:08 PM »
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Very well put, Ray.


Thak you, Eric. I hope one day my photos may match my writing skills.  Grin
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John Camp
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« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2012, 11:30:12 PM »
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Call me elitist if you like, but you can't compare the pianistic skills of Elton John with those of Frederic Chopin.

Sure you can. Chopin is better than Elton. See, I compared them.

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Ray
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« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2012, 11:39:28 PM »
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Sure you can. Chopin is better than Elton. See, I compared them.



Hey! John, I never realised that logic was your strong point.  Grin
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John Camp
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« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2012, 11:51:49 PM »
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Hey! John, I never realised that logic was your strong point.  Grin

Made me laugh.
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