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Author Topic: Everything that's Most Important in Photography I Learned from Classical Music  (Read 11436 times)
Rob C
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« Reply #60 on: September 11, 2012, 08:34:11 AM »
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In the studio, the music was never off; pirates Radio Scotland as well as Radio Caroline North kept me sane through many long, weary, overnight stays in the darkroom, fingers frozen from turning over sets of batch prints in the wash, wondering how in hell to get them all glazed for mid-morning delivery in Glasgow's city centre. Those were the days - or nights. But I'll never forget the Mamas and the Papas immortal and oh so relevant line: And the darkest hour is just before dawn.

Shooting was exactly the same: music non-stop.

I appreciate that this isn't at all on the esoteric level that some would wish it to be; but, it was real and not part of some bullshit mental game of spiritual self-deception. It made everything possible, made everything work. Not so bad, really, even if Chopin never earned his way into the studio...

;-)

Rob C
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #61 on: September 12, 2012, 11:12:32 AM »
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I appreciate that this isn't at all on the esoteric level that some would wish it to be; [...]
Oh, but the question is very practical and real, indeed : does the way music makes you feel relate to the way photography makes you feel?



As far as I am concerned, I tried (just for the fun of the experiment) to listen to Bach while post-processing.
As long as the music was somewhat light, or at least not too charged (Glenn Gould comes to my mind), it was only a minor disturbance and an incitation to reverie instead of concentrating on LR's cursors and tools. Counter-productive, in a word.
I did not dare to try Herr unser Herrscher (St-Matthew opening) as, notwithstanding being a complete atheist, it always brings me on the verge of tears (some other sacred cantates are also good at this). Not much to do with the tears of tragedy and pathos by the way, more some emotive surexcitation.

In a way, it is quite reassuring : my photography is the one of a mere mortal, and is mundane enough not to threaten to turn my mind upside down.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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Ray
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« Reply #62 on: September 12, 2012, 07:37:58 PM »
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As far as I am concerned, I tried (just for the fun of the experiment) to listen to Bach while post-processing.
As long as the music was somewhat light, or at least not too charged (Glenn Gould comes to my mind), it was only a minor disturbance and an incitation to reverie instead of concentrating on LR's cursors and tools. Counter-productive, in a word.
I did not dare to try Herr unser Herrscher (St-Matthew opening) as, notwithstanding being a complete atheist, it always brings me on the verge of tears (some other sacred cantates are also good at this). Not much to do with the tears of tragedy and pathos by the way, more some emotive surexcitation.

In a way, it is quite reassuring : my photography is the one of a mere mortal, and is mundane enough not to threaten to turn my mind upside down.

I feel in a similar way about this issue. Despite the concept of multi-tasking, one cannot properly concentrate on more than one task simultaneously, which is why answering one's mobile phone whilst driving a car is not recommended.

Classical music is often so magnificent, complex, elaborate and emotionally overpowering, that to even attempt to relegate it to the status of non-intrusive background music would be a crying shame.
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Rob C
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« Reply #63 on: September 14, 2012, 04:05:19 AM »
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I feel in a similar way about this issue. Despite the concept of multi-tasking, one cannot properly concentrate on more than one task simultaneously, which is why answering one's mobile phone whilst driving a car is not recommended.

Classical music is often so magnificent, complex, elaborate and emotionally overpowering, that to even attempt to relegate it to the status of non-intrusive background music would be a crying shame.




There you are: no constants, no absolutes. My wife could always manage a hundred different things at the same time whereas I never could; she hated music in the car if she was driving but I love it. As a child, I used to do my homework with the radio switched on and it did me no harm whatsoever. The single time in the car when I had to switch music off was when reversing into a parking space. That requires so much absolute concentration that even conversation has to cease. I say had to switch off because I now drive in silent mode. Why? Because the bloody trafficators donít make enough noise and because in the Fiesta the blinking warning lights are placed at the extreme edges of the instrument panel where the hands obscure them in the driving position. And why should any of that create a problem? Because the damned indicators donít cancel soon enough: they continue to flash unless you almost do a loop in the opposite direction! When your car is constantly indicating either left or right, it will ultimately cause an accident when you do make that turn. I went back to the dealer and before Iíd finished my tale he laughed and said theyíre all the same: even his own Focus does itÖ design, bloody design!

However, I donít really believe that that implies a lack of concentration on my driving when Iím driving forwards. In fact, I believe that nobody drives with their mind switched onto Ďdrivingí per se; I believe that after a while one drives on auto, subconsciously, all the time. Iíve lost count of the number of times I realise that I have no idea whether I got to where I was going easily or whether I had to stop at lights etc. and stopping at lights here is memorable: we have very few. I know exactly why I have to switch off when reversing, though: cars since the 70s have generally suffered from dreadful design faults that limit parking ability: you can no longer see where the frigginí corners are. In many, you canít even see where anything might be since vision ends at the edge of the dashboard. Progress, yes. Why do you imagine they invented those expensive parking bleepers if not to screw even more money out of us whilst hiding the basic design flaw that creates the need in the first place?

Now, regarding working at the computer, whether typing messages as now, or working on a picture, I have no idea what the last song I heard might have been: itís simply a very pleasant atmosphere in which to do that which I am doing; itís a cocoon of comfort. Just as it is when taking the pictures.

Rob C
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Ray
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« Reply #64 on: September 14, 2012, 10:10:21 AM »
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The single time in the car when I had to switch music off was when reversing into a parking space. That requires so much absolute concentration that even conversation has to cease.

There we are, then, Rob! It's all a matter of the degree of concentration required for a particular task. Normal driving is fairly automatic. Listening to music or engaging in conversation is fine, as long as one's eye is on the road and one's hand is on the steering wheel.

If one's photographic processing is largely automatic, a click here and a click there, then sure one can simultaneously appreciate fine music. Speaking for myself, when I'm carefully trying to select a particular part of an image for enhancement, I find the rousing music of Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries a bit distracting.  Grin
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Rob C
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« Reply #65 on: September 14, 2012, 12:50:07 PM »
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There we are, then, Rob! It's all a matter of the degree of concentration required for a particular task. Normal driving is fairly automatic. Listening to music or engaging in conversation is fine, as long as one's eye is on the road and one's hand is on the steering wheel.

If one's photographic processing is largely automatic, a click here and a click there, then sure one can simultaneously appreciate fine music. Speaking for myself, when I'm carefully trying to select a particular part of an image for enhancement, I find the rousing music of Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries a bit distracting.  Grin



So did Wagner; that's why he had to get it the hell out of his system.

At least Beethoven had Chuck Berry to help him roll himself out of his misery. Everyone eventually needs a sweet little rock 'n' roller.

;-)

Rob C
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