Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Epson Settings for Canson Baryta Photo?  (Read 5898 times)
One Frame at a Time
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


« on: August 25, 2012, 01:15:32 PM »
ReplyReply

Bought some Canson Baryta for my 3880.  I have read in a couple places (not n this forum) that the paper thickness should be set to 0.4mm and Gap to "wide".  
I have measured the paper with a micrometer and its almost exactly 0.3 mm thick, not 0.4.  So wondering if the correct setting is really 0.3 mm and left at Auto??  
It is much stiffer than Epson's Premium semi-gloss, even though they both measure 0.3mm.   Manual feeding would seem the correct way to go.

A couple other questions: is the platen gap setting universal across the Epson printer line up?  ie "wide" or "wider" is the same on a 3880, a 4900 and a 7900?

And, is there a downside to setting the gap wider than it needs to be by one setting, say "wide" instead of "auto"?

Adding another question:  Comparing test prints of the Printer Evaluation Image V2 one on Canson Baryta and the other on Platine some startling differences (and similarities)
show clearly.  Reds and greens on the test patches are very different but the section of the strawberries does not look that strikingly different.  Seems strange?
How much are the color differences impacted by using the stock ICC profiles from Canson's web site?  I guess what I am asking is to what extent am I comparing
the papers? Or, am I really looking at the differences in the respective profiles Canson provides for each paper on the 3880??

Thanks again!,

Paul
« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 01:32:50 PM by One Frame at a Time » Logged
Alan Goldhammer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1620


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 01:27:20 PM »
ReplyReply

See Erick Chan's explanation:  http://people.csail.mit.edu/ericchan/dp/Epson3800/faq.html#platengapnumbers
Logged

Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6891


WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2012, 01:28:42 PM »
ReplyReply

This is essentially the same paper as Ilford Gold Fibre Silk, which I used routinely on my Epson 3800 before I bought my 4900. I set the platen gap to wide and the thickness to 0.4, after an experience with a head-strike using the default settings. From that time onward there was never a problem with paper feed and the prints were fine.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Ken
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 179



WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2012, 01:37:41 PM »
ReplyReply

If you were building an engine, you probably wouldn't want the diameters of the piston and cylinder to be the same. If you measured 0.3mm, then 0.4 would be right because the paper has to move through that gap. My 7900 is set up for "auto" for most papers in that thickness range. Setting it very much higher, especially with that paper on a roll (it's like spring steel), could result in the print head hitting the paper edge.

I don't know if "wide" and "wider" are universal measurements on other Epson printers.
Logged
One Frame at a Time
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2012, 01:47:04 PM »
ReplyReply


Thanks Alan, I stumbled upon this article  in an earlier search.  Did not read all of it then, but I have read more of it.  Not liking what I'm reading about head strikes possibly damaging the head.  Sad I have printed several images and all seems well.  But the first sheet of 17x22 platine I fed into the machine did product a sever head strike problem for about an area 2 inches wide and 2.5 inches long.  It was not near the end of the job but maybe 1/3 into it.  You could actually see where the head scratched the paper.  White lines and no ink.    Of course I did not know to change the settings prior but did so immediately.... Angry Angry
I would think it would be fairly easy for Epson to monitor the current the motor drive us using and stop the job if it passed a certain threshold.  Seems stupid to let the head grind the paper like this and not have a safe by-pass.  Especially if the head can sustain damage!

Thanks for you response,

P.
Logged
One Frame at a Time
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2012, 01:53:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks Ken, that makes sense.  But the setting says: "paper thickness" so I figured it wants to know that information and make use of it - however Epson decided?  Maybe you say answered another question I had but did not ask.  That is the difference between the Thickness setting and the Platen Gap.... They seem related - maybe your analogy is the answer.
Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6891


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2012, 01:56:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Why not try what I suggested and don't sweat the theory. What works, works. If you get head-strikes with a setting of 3 and default gap, for this paper you need to move at least one up on both.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
One Frame at a Time
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2012, 02:08:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Why not try what I suggested and don't sweat the theory. What works, works. If you get head-strikes with a setting of 3 and default gap, for this paper you need to move at least one up on both.


Done!  Thanks Mark Wink  (I still have a stomach ache from seeing how the print head gouged the paper on my first 17 inch print using Platine....) 
Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6891


WWW
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2012, 02:28:34 PM »
ReplyReply

As long as it still makes good prints, let your stomach rest at ease. No harm was done in that case. Sometimes it's better not to reason why........:-)
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Alistair
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 210


WWW
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2012, 07:44:13 AM »
ReplyReply

Bought some Canson Baryta for my 3880.  ...

Adding another question:  Comparing test prints of the Printer Evaluation Image V2 one on Canson Baryta and the other on Platine some startling differences (and similarities)
show clearly.  Reds and greens on the test patches are very different but the section of the strawberries does not look that strikingly different.  Seems strange?
How much are the color differences impacted by using the stock ICC profiles from Canson's web site?  I guess what I am asking is to what extent am I comparing
the papers? Or, am I really looking at the differences in the respective profiles Canson provides for each paper on the 3880??

Thanks again!,

Paul

I use both these papers quite extensively on a 7880. Some of the profiles on the Canson site are duds. I have communicated with them on this and they admitted as much. They sent me a revised profile for CFB on my 7880 and it is spot on. Having said that, I get the same (good) output using the IGFS profile with the CPB! Having got a custom profile made for the Platine, the colours are the same as the CPB but the CPB has a slightly larger gamut into the  reds, greens, purples and blues as well as less dot gain (so is sharper). This is discussed on this site here: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/the_paper_that_almost_got_away.shtml . With the right profiles reds should be near identical but with the CPB giving a little more punch.
Platine handles beautifully off a roll (not an issue for the 3880) whereas the CPB has a curl that will just not go away!
Logged

Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6891


WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2012, 09:41:20 AM »
ReplyReply

To answer the question directly, using different profiles for the same paper can make a huge difference in colour rendition. You can compare the papers in some respects, for example Maximum Black, but when it comes to colour rendition, it is a combination of profile and paper, so it's like trying to unscramble an omelet unless one of the variables - either the paper or the profile - is held constant for any one comparison. Compare two different papers with the same profile, or the same paper with different profiles, but not the two together - at that point what is causing what is indeterminate.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Alan Goldhammer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1620


WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2012, 11:00:33 AM »
ReplyReply

Baryta papers also seem to give a slightly broader color gamut than non-baryta papers.  I don't think that one can cross compare these papers as they really are different, sometimes in non subtle ways.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad