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Author Topic: Parade's End  (Read 2613 times)
Rob C
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« on: August 31, 2012, 11:35:40 AM »
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I was flicking through the tv channels at one point yesterday and came across a trailer for what I think's Part 2 of this series; I happened to be on the BBC HD channel at the time I saw this and what struck me was a portrait shot of a woman seen just beyond a sort of lampshade with OOF dangling bits...(the shade, not the woman). It was bloody exquisite! Whether just a combination of subject and the feeling of unbelievably beautiful colour tones, it registered!

In fact, some of the most wonderful people lighting I ever see comes from motion work; their landscape is also miles ahead of what generally appears in print. Those guys certainly know their business, and perhaps there's also a contribution from the lenses, that I'm told are far superior to the best available for stills work.

The next episode (tonight) is on at 9pm UK time, or 10pm for Spain, on BBC 2 and BBC HD. The subject matter may not be up your street (my wife would have loved it) but I think I'll watch just in hope of seeing that single setup once more. Wish I could do things like that.

Ironically, just as I get myself a background that I can use, my PS computer gives up the ghost! Probably means it'll be away for at least a week; will take it to the repair man tomorrow. How do we come to depend upon these devices for our sanity? Not good.

Rob C

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Sharon Van Lieu
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2012, 01:44:09 PM »
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I've been without my main computer for a couple of months now Rob. It is horrible! I have ordered a new one - coming soon.

I know what you mean about the photographic beauty you can find in movies. I find them to be very inspiring at times. I'll keep my eyes open for the series here.

Sharon
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2012, 02:08:32 PM »
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I've been without my main computer for a couple of months now Rob. It is horrible! I have ordered a new one - coming soon.

I know what you mean about the photographic beauty you can find in movies. I find them to be very inspiring at times. I'll keep my eyes open for the series here.

Sharon

Hi Sharon

A chap who fronts some good travel stuff on BBC is Francesco da Mosto. Some beautiful movie scenics feature in his Italian and Mediterranean travels. If you can catch this material, worth a look.

http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_da_Mosto

Rob C
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2012, 02:50:35 PM »
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what I think's Part 2 of this series;
It would have been the first episode as part 2 is on tonight.

Nice to hear you enjoyed it, I'll pass it on. The camera op, Ian Adrian, was part of my crew last week and was telling us about how some of it was shot. Sounds like they had some fun shooting the big crane shots.

Not too sure about some of the CGI bits myself, but nice enough if you like that sort of story.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2012, 03:45:58 PM »
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Those guys certainly know their business, and perhaps there's also a contribution from the lenses, that I'm told are far superior to the best available for stills work.

'Twas ever thus Rob,

Having transmogrified some decades ago from Motion to Still images I have always been patently aware of a few hone truths:

  • On a commercial level, motion picture camera work is about filling the frame with information, narrative and being an integral component in a product.
  • All too often commercial still photography is simply about filling space on a page and being a support component to a process of putting dots of ink on paper.
  • There is a strong element of 'no ticket = no start' in TV and Film to the point that in some quarters one almost had to be born into the business (for better for worse).
  • The production of moving pictures is more often a collaborative effort of a chain of experienced and trained ancillary operators.

I doubt that I agree concerning the optics for motion pictures.  The moving image requires far less resolution than the still image and this has resulted in many motion picture cameras being fitted with stills lenses.  In fact, of late, normal DSLR cameras have been used for a lot of moving picture shooting because of the increased resolution (and other factors).  Baz Lurman has just been shooting a new version of The Great Gatsby here and had as many as 10 Canon 5D MkIIs shooting some scenes.  Additional to the image quality, just think how easy it is to conceal a 35mm DSLR within a set as opposed to an Arri or a Panaflex.

I suspect that BUDGET plays a significant role also; although clearly there are times when lack of budget is patently obvious.

Cheers,

W
« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 03:49:26 PM by WalterEG » Logged
Rhossydd
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« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2012, 03:53:00 PM »
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There is a strong element of 'no ticket = no start' in TV and Film to the point that in some quarters one almost had to be born into the business (for better for worse).
Absolutely NOT the case in the UK TV industry.
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2012, 04:37:06 PM »
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It would have been the first episode as part 2 is on tonight.Nice to hear you enjoyed it, I'll pass it on. The camera op, Ian Adrian, was part of my crew last week and was telling us about how some of it was shot. Sounds like they had some fun shooting the big crane shots.

Not too sure about some of the CGI bits myself, but nice enough if you like that sort of story.

No, I've just watched Part 2 tonight; all I saw yesterday was a trailer for the show - didn't see Part 1 at all. There were great bits and not so great bits tonight, but on the whole, it has a lot of period drama and great styling. I shall try to see where it leads -assuming it didn't end tonight and that not having seen Part 1 I hadn't realised... One bit that's so beautiful is a pair of shots of the couple out on the edge of a cliff; the first shot looks long lens, but the second one of the same thing is even closer up - magnificent colour, light, everything. Wow! Exactly why I love Hans Feurer in stills.

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2012, 04:58:54 PM »
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Absolutely NOT the case in the UK TV industry.



Perhaps not today, but certainly in the 50s, when I was awakening form childhood, you had to be close to the movie and tv union. It was very unionised - ACTT, I think. (Neither was it any easier for actors to break into the business.) I got as far as getting a reply to my letter (from David Lean) regarding job prospects in cinematography; teaboy was the gist, but playing teaboy from Scotland was financially impossble unless living on the pavement was an acceptable option. That's nobody's fault but mine for being where I was, not rich, and just one of the games Life plays.

Never mind movies: when I was first designing calendars I ran into problems with getting artwork handled and blocks made. SLADE flexed its muscle and, for a period, you had to get stickers to apply to your artwork in order to permit blockmakers to handle the stuff. It eventually just went away: those companies needed the work; stuff the union honchos. But it was a difficult period.

Getting a job as an apprentice in a printing works was almost impossible if you didn't come born with ink in your veins, and the latter was as recently as the 80s.

But, that's only one way of looking at it: as a barrier. However, from behind that barrier, it makes damned sound sense and I have a great deal of sympathy.

Rob C
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WalterEG
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« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2012, 05:28:36 PM »
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Absolutely NOT the case in the UK TV industry.

You surprise me Rhossydd,

Things must have changed.  A mate of mine who worked on motion pictures in the UK for over 30 years always speaks of the difficulty in getting a start because it was a closed shop and the union ruled all.

Cheers,

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Rhossydd
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« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2012, 12:34:21 AM »
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Perhaps not today, but certainly in the 50s, when I was awakening form childhood, you had to be close to the movie and tv union. It was very unionised - ACTT, I think.
Don't quote my comment then ramble off about something else.
I SPECIFICALLY said "TV", nothing to do with movies.
If you want to talk about 60 years ago, at least get the facts right. For most of the 50s there was only the BBC and when ITV started nearly everyone was recruited from the BBC as no one else had any experience of television.
The BBC never has or does work as a closed shop and entry was very much a meritocracy. Anyone could apply, but only suitably capable applicants would get recruited and trained.
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2012, 12:36:15 AM »
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Things must have changed.  A mate of mine who worked on motion pictures .....
Just have the courtesy to comment on what you quote me as saying.
I was specifically talking about television, NOT movies.
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KLaban
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2012, 02:45:25 AM »
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Everything Downton should have been.

Look for Anne-Marie Duff as Edith Duchemin. Not a conventional beauty but a face that would have made Edward Burne-Jones weak at the knees.
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Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2012, 03:19:18 AM »
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Don't quote my comment then ramble off about something else.
I SPECIFICALLY said "TV", nothing to do with movies.
If you want to talk about 60 years ago, at least get the facts right. For most of the 50s there was only the BBC and when ITV started nearly everyone was recruited from the BBC as no one else had any experience of television.
The BBC never has or does work as a closed shop and entry was very much a meritocracy. Anyone could apply, but only suitably capable applicants would get recruited and trained.


How strange your reaction. I'm not saying you are/were a union leader or any other form of constrictor, and as you say, I was there to witness the start of ITV. Yes, I'm sure the few people in the industry of tv and film (combined union in ACTT: Association of Cinema and Television Trades) with the experience needed originated from the Beeb, but where does that make any difference?

I like the open doors thing about BBC though; look at anyone who's made it big and you find Oxford and a sprinkling of Cambridge and almost nothing else. Oh! I think I remember a single guy from both my old school and then Glasgow Uni, made it in production via STV and then moved on and in...

However, none of this unexpected acid in my face makes the slightest difference to Parade's End, which has been wonderfully made.

And no, I shall not be suckered into another of those pointless circular battles again!

Rob C
« Last Edit: September 01, 2012, 11:40:55 AM by Rob C » Logged

WalterEG
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« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2012, 02:48:06 PM »
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Rhossydd,

To complete my earlier statement;  My friend worked in Motion Pictures because he could not get a start at the BBC due to not being in the Union.  And it was one of those round-robin sorts of things where you could not get a ticket unless you had a job.  That was in the 1960s so I guess the moral of the story is to always have the courtesy to NEVER say NEVER.

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Rhossydd
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« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2012, 03:09:40 PM »
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My friend worked in Motion Pictures because he could not get a start at the BBC due to not being in the Union. 
Absolute rubbish. The BBC has NEVER been a closed shop in any area.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2012, 03:28:56 PM »
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It is NOT rubbish, absolute or otherwise, and may I suggest that if you are to engage on a forum and expect to earn any credibility whatsoever that you might at least make an attempt at being civil.

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Rhossydd
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2012, 01:55:11 AM »
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It is NOT rubbish,
How do you know ? You've just mentioned a second hand anecdotal story from someone that didn't get a job there.
Quote
if you are to engage on a forum and expect to earn any credibility whatsoever that you might at least make an attempt at being civil.
Credibility comes from factual accuracy, and not hiding behind an anonymous id

Check my profile, go to my web site. I spent 22 years on staff as a TV cameraman in the BBC so I do know when people are talking rubbish about it.
No one in the BBC ever had, or has, to be in a trade union. Furthermore all collective pay negotiation, health and safety issues etc was carried out via the BBC's own staff association the ABS that was associated to the trade union congress (which became BETA and now BECTU). The ACTT was never acknowledged.
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