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Author Topic: Links to Photographers  (Read 30382 times)
Rob C
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« on: September 01, 2012, 02:53:00 PM »
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We used to have a thread or two listing photographers whose work we liked. Long lost in the mists of time (the threads), here's a guy who used to be in the fashion business and advertising and then went to the landscape side (almost said dark side):

http://www.chris-simpson.com

Rob C
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2012, 04:22:52 PM »
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Wonderful photography - thanks for that link.
(There is a fantastic shot of a Catalina for which I have forwarded the link to a nephew of mine who is completing the restoration of one.)
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Christopher Sanderson
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2012, 04:58:27 PM »
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Wonderful photography - thanks for that link.
(There is a fantastic shot of a Catalina for which I have forwarded the link to a nephew of mine who is completing the restoration of one.)


Hi Chris -

Glad to have been of some direct help!

Rob C
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Riaan van Wyk
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2012, 02:28:03 PM »
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Thanks for the link Rob!

Chris, talking about the Catalina photo, the lake, about three minutes drive from my place of residence used to house a squadron of them during the second world war and if memory serves me correctly ( it more than often doesn't) there is one still lying submerged there.

If I may add some links to South African photographers Rob:

http://stuartapseyphotography.com/gallery/
http://www.delende.com/
http://www.gregmarinovich.com/BLOG/
http://www.joaosilva.co.za/



 
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Rob C
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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 01:32:18 PM »
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Thanks, Riaan, there's definitely a sort of S.A. style comes through.

Here's another of my late favourites: Duffy.

http://www.duffyphotographer.com

I love this quotation, which encapsulates everything I've always said here about photography and talent:

"It is simple, if you allow it to be, there's nothing to do in photography, it just happens."

Absolutely.

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2012, 02:21:41 PM »
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Looks to me like a recent re-do; certainly a man who knows all about stock!

If you want another old car - Pontiac - get into the "Road Trip" gallery.

http://www.ericmeola.com

Rob C


P.S. Makes me want to sell everything and take up sleeping.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 02:41:49 PM by Rob C » Logged

WalterEG
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2012, 03:11:58 PM »
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One of the very select few who actually understand colour and make it work well.
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2012, 03:11:27 AM »
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One of the very select few who actually understand colour and make it work well.


Not to mention the fact that he made his name in the bold old world of film - probably Kodachrome/Ektachrome?... Should make today's younger folks realise that digital may well have contributed many advantages, but quailty isn't always one of them.

How I wish that stock was still viable as a means of earning one's keep, paying for all the travel etc. It would be a lifestyle in its own right. Now that I've not much else that's better to do, there's no possible way of making it pay for itself. Bugger. Bad timing. (No, I don't consider camping, living under canvas or in the back of a van a viable way of life; that would be a sentence for a crime I didn't commit!)

Rob C
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WalterEG
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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2012, 04:32:30 AM »
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Should make today's younger folks realise that digital may well have contributed many advantages, but quailty isn't always one of them.

Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W
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Rob C
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2012, 02:16:37 PM »
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Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W




And counting!

If I can give it a plus, it's with high ASA that was out of reach with films that I knew about. I also realise that without it I'd have had to quit the expense of frequent amateur shooting - but then, I'd probably have been able to continue doing it as a pro... Anyway, the 'frequent amateur shooting' has probably given me four or so shots from hundreds - thousands? - that I've shot since getting a digital camera that strike me as worth thinking about.

Putting this whole damned electronic madness into some perspective: this past week I had my cellphone contract changed to disable Internet access - All I ever needed was a 'phone for emergencies if out of the house, and had the last two Nokias not died or had the batteries become irreplaceable, I'd probably have bought a little pocket camera instead of this smartthing. Losing Internet has cut my monthly mobile bill in half!

Rob C
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ckimmerle
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« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2012, 06:13:08 PM »
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Rob,

As you are probably aware I am in the vanguard of those who doubt  that digital contributed anything at all other than tearing apart an industry or two and playing into the hands of the bean-counters demanding commercial expedience at the expense of all else.

W

Completely assinine statement.
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"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust

Chuck Kimmerle
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WalterEG
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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2012, 08:02:59 PM »
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Completely assinine statement.


In YOUR opinion.

If you are hoping to be part of a community - any community - a good starting point is to respect and be tolerant of the views of other members .... even if they differ from your own.  In fact, especially if they differ from your own.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 03:57:08 AM by WalterEG » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2012, 03:02:37 AM »
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Completely assinine statement.




Ask Kodak, Ilford, Agfa, ask the photo-chemical suppliers to the industry, not to mention camera manufacturers etc. It's been far from a bloodless revolution and for what? To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Pace professional stock shooters et al.

Rob C
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Photo Op
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« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2012, 03:29:09 AM »
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 To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs.


The word "troglodyte" comes to mind. Film.....get over it!
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« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2012, 04:37:03 AM »
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Back to the original post - if we can possibly tear ourselves away from the endlessly fascinating topic of film versus digital - I reckon Chris Simpson's "artist statement" - the last few paras of the biography section on his site - is very illuminating about the distinctive quality of his wonderful photographs, which is not so common for artist statements. I also think the southern hemisphere rules, among his photographs as in so many other dimensions.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 04:39:49 AM by kencameron » Logged

Rob C
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« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2012, 05:18:58 AM »
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The word "troglodyte" comes to mind. Film.....get over it!




One has little choice; it isn't the digital medium in the sense of a direct film/digital comparison that's the basic problem here, it's the fact that its advent has fucked up many many peoole's professional lives as well as entire industries in order to achieve what? In order that the world may float away on a tide of well-exposed sterility and mediocrity. Anyone can produce crap, and when it costs nothing, there's no natural brake on its production. So, the markets collapse under its flood as nobody buying pictures has the time to delve deeply enough to find the gems in the bog. Go to even the big stock sites and tell me that they, too, are not swamped with rubbish - it's become a numbers game to the ultimate degree. People no longer get into it to earn their crust: they do it for the imagined glory of, one day, making a dollar or two. And I mean one or two.

In effect, it's no longer about being good or bad, but whether you do it for money or for laughs, and the hell with those whose living you destroy; yes, there's even a new, borrowed buzzword for it: collateral damage.

Some deal.

Rob C

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Riaan van Wyk
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« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2012, 01:34:11 PM »
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http://www.baileyphotos.com/

Take a look at the wildlife portfolio, African Wildlife photography at it's best.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2012, 04:52:31 PM »
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I reckon Chris Simpson's "artist statement" - the last few paras of the biography section on his site - is very illuminating about the distinctive quality of his wonderful photographs, which is not so common for artist statements.

Thanks for the heads-up Ken,

His whole Bio was a fascinating read but, you're right,  the guts of it was in the sting of the tail.

Cheers,

W
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RSL
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« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2012, 05:44:17 PM »
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Ask Kodak, Ilford, Agfa, ask the photo-chemical suppliers to the industry, not to mention camera manufacturers etc. It's been far from a bloodless revolution and for what? To make it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Pace professional stock shooters et al.

Rob C

Rob, transitions like this never have been bloodless. The cotton gin revolution was bloody. The horseless carriage revolution was bloody. The transition from manual to computer bookkeeping was bloody. The transition from operator-connected phones to automation was bloody. To name just a few. In every transition like these, masses of people lose their jobs, and the society has to adjust to doing things differently. But in the end, society always has been the beneficiary.

I don't agree with Walter. Everybody gets cranked up because, as you say, digital has made it easier for non-photographers to make reasonably exposed photographs. Why is that bad? Making it easier for people to make reasonably exposed photographs doesn't make them better photographers. Reasonable exposure, reasonable focus, reasonable depth of field, these things never have been the criteria for a fine photograph. The criterion has been the capture of something meaningful, something that can give the viewer a transcendental experience -- just as that's been the criterion for great music, great poetry, great painting, etc.

Yes, professional photographers have taken a big hit, just as cotton separators took a big hit, and buggy makers and livery operators took a big hit, and bookkeepers took a big hit, and telephone operators took a big hit. You should be happy you're retired. You missed the worst of the hit.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2012, 06:02:33 PM »
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Russ,

It goes without saying that you are welcome to disagree with me but I just want to point out that I am not so much talking about just the photographer end of things, but the broader industry-wide implications.

I don't get cranked up, I just make mention of the loss, in some areas, of some wonderful skills and crafts.

I have used digital for many years as a matter of commercial expedience - survival, if you like.  It works.  In fact, at times it works too well.  But it denies me the joy of working in the ruby glow of a safelight with the sound of running water.  What that has meant is that there is now a greater divide between my commercial exploits and my recreational photographic exploits.  It isn't a problem and what I expressed was not a problem - but merely an observation.

Cheers,

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