Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Landscapes from above  (Read 5919 times)
Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« on: September 03, 2012, 12:59:51 PM »
ReplyReply

Usually we are shooting landscapes from the ground. But changing the perspective and shooting from above yields totally different images which can be pretty amazing. I came into touch with this fascinating field because I am currently organizing an exhibition to be shown on this year´s Photokina in Cologne, together with Bernhard Edmaier and Stephan Zirwes. Both are doing outstanding work from helicopters, which appear to be the most popular platform for aerials.

Now I´d like to know who else is doing great aerials - any suggestions? Two others I can contribute to the list would be George Steinmetz, who uses a motorized paraglider for shooting (and for impressing the people below), and Yann Arthus-Bertrand.
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 1498


« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2012, 01:53:39 PM »
ReplyReply

Whilst shooting around sunset at Castlerigg stone circle in Cumbria, someone was flying one of these  -

with a small digi-cam attached, enabling him to get aerial shots of the stones. I'd like to see the sorts of results he got. Someone I know uses a kite with a digital compact for aerial shots - the results are pretty good, if a little down to serendipity
Logged
Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 02:12:14 PM »
ReplyReply

Oh yes, I believe there´s a lot to come, once these mini drones having a reasonable payload have become affordable. I´m waiting for one that would be capable of reliably carrying a MF camera with a digital back and allowing for sending a viewfinder image to an iPhone on the ground. Probably years ahead, but I guess we will see them. Today´s professional drones unfortunately are still incredibly expensive ($ 20,000+, as far as I know).
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
tom b
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 869


WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2012, 03:40:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Richard Woldendorp does some great aerial photography of Australia.

Cheers,
Logged

john beardsworth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2759



WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2012, 03:58:18 PM »
ReplyReply

This Polish guy's web site is everything one dislikes about Flash-based sites, but I think some of his pictures are worth it http://www.kacperkowalski.pl/ .
Logged

Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2012, 04:18:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Ughh... you´re right, flashwise he´s got everything you don´t want to see on a website. But I fully agree: some of his shots are just outstanding. It´s a pity that he really overdoes contrast and saturation in many cases, but I would assume that that´s just happened when setting up his website and is not found on his original prints.
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
MarkH2
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 94


WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2012, 10:34:20 PM »
ReplyReply

In case you haven't become acquianted with these, they are really quite amazing and delightful.  They have set the bar high.

3D Virtual Tours Around the World http://www.airpano.com/

Logged
Kirk Gittings
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1547


WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2012, 11:12:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Adriel Heisey is a well known ultralight aerial photographer in the American Southwest, including numerous exhibitions, books and magazines including National Geographic. See: http://www.adrielheisey.com/
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 11:13:53 PM by Kirk Gittings » Logged

Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
Architecture and Landscape Photography
WWW.GITTINGSPHOTO.COM

LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
Petrus
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 499


« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2012, 11:33:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Today´s professional drones unfortunately are still incredibly expensive ($ 20,000+, as far as I know).

A RC helicopter similar to the one in the picture can carry a 5D3 with WA lens, has GPS control, can automatically fly a plotted route controlled from a laptop and costs only 2000€ fully equipped. Revolution in aerial photography (combined with stitching) and videography, well demonstrated by the airpano site mentioned earlier.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 11:35:45 PM by Petrus » Logged
DougJ
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44


« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2012, 11:43:13 PM »
ReplyReply

I was in Sequim (Olympic Peninsula), WA this Labour Day weekend to attend their first hot air balloon.  At the early morning launches of the balloon I noticed a small hexa-copter flying in and around the balloons.  I tracked down the operator (see http://roswellflighttestcrew.typepad.com/) and his truck way off to one side of the launch area.  The man flying the "bee" was using a standard multi link RC controller to fly the thing while wearing "glasses" (scroll down on the above link) to see what the camera on the copter was seeing; in the back of the truck was a 32-in(Huh) TV displaying what the operator was seeing in his glasses.  The rig was also flown at night to capture the balloon glow demonstrations.  These folk were not into "art," but I think art is possible with this technology.

Ciao,

Doug


Logged
Mjollnir
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 305


« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2012, 08:23:18 AM »
ReplyReply

I was in Sequim (Olympic Peninsula), WA this Labour Day weekend to attend their first hot air balloon.  At the early morning launches of the balloon I noticed a small hexa-copter flying in and around the balloons.  I tracked down the operator (see http://roswellflighttestcrew.typepad.com/) and his truck way off to one side of the launch area.  The man flying the "bee" was using a standard multi link RC controller to fly the thing while wearing "glasses" (scroll down on the above link) to see what the camera on the copter was seeing; in the back of the truck was a 32-in(Huh) TV displaying what the operator was seeing in his glasses.  The rig was also flown at night to capture the balloon glow demonstrations.  These folk were not into "art," but I think art is possible with this technology.

Ciao,

Doug


Man, with a better camera, using one of those in, say, Yosemite Valley, could bring heretofore impossible to get angles and perspectives.

Me want.
Logged
Smoothjazz
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2012, 11:45:48 AM »
ReplyReply

I have to say, some of the photos of the dunes by Adriel Heisey are true masterpieces....very inspiring. Makes me want to go out and get an ultralight plane!
Logged
atlnq9
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23


« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2012, 01:29:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Passed away now; but the best mountain aerial photographer would have been Bradford Washburn.  Stunning 8x10 large formats taken using a Fairchild in Alaska and the Yukon (and even Mt. Everest).  All of his images were from planes with doors removed flying in sub zero (F) temperatures from planes.  He was also a pilot which really aided his aerial photography because he could tell the pilot to give the plane more rudder, etc. and position perfectly.  Most all of his images were never marketed well until late in his life because he primarily did it for map making and finding new climbing routes.  But the most stunning aerial images in the mountains ever.  Ansel Adams was even in awe of his work.  He even did stereo images by having the pilot keep the plane level.

Looking to get a gyro myself.  Think this offers the best option for cost vs. portability vs. adaptability with the 3 axis gyro from kenyon labs:

http://www.aerialexposures.com/gyroplatform.htm
Logged
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2012, 02:04:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Really like the Kowalski stuff.  Fun to see the signature of his aircraft in some of those.  I especially like straight down shots.   Don't care as much for the style where we are looking at angles around 45 degrees, which are informative but put the viewer in a distracting orientation.

All I really want is to get the camera maybe 20 to 30 feet above the ground, and sometimes in locations that are blocked by fences or difficult terrain.  I have a long list of locations that are are so-so from the ground, but would be killer with just a little more camera height.  Have been looking close at those multi-copters.  All it takes is the nerve to hang your $5000 camera package on dirtball hobby motors and electronics all too capable of failing at any time.  Cheap, lightweight cameras are possibly the way to go.
Logged
cybis
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 163



WWW
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2012, 02:38:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Now I´d like to know who else is doing great aerials - any suggestions?

I do Grin : Behance and www.lucbusquin.com
Logged

Atina
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 40


« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2014, 02:43:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Cameron Davidson:

http://www.camerondavidson.com

Karel Tomeď, from The Netherlands

http://www.flyingcamera.nl

Nick Rains, from Australia

http://www.nickrainsimaging.com/?q=aerial

« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 03:19:54 PM by Atina » Logged
Petrus
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 499


« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2014, 12:11:12 AM »
ReplyReply

All it takes is the nerve to hang your $5000 camera package on dirtball hobby motors and electronics all too capable of failing at any time.

The 2000€ 6 blade copter that was demonstrated to me can loose 2 engines and still fly back. They are quite amazing.
Logged
markmullen
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 53


WWW
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2014, 07:06:37 PM »
ReplyReply

I would buy a quad copter in a heartbeat if we didn't have such strict regulations on using them commercially here in the uk. I bet some of my architect clients would love it.
Logged
Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2014, 03:46:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Man, with a better camera, using one of those in, say, Yosemite Valley, could bring heretofore impossible to get angles and perspectives.

Me want.

Too late, I´m afraid. As far as I know, Yosemite park has been closed to drones recently.
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2014, 04:04:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Back to the serious stuff: Swedish photographer Hans Strand is about to publish his book "ICELAND above & below". The book will be available in August, and there is a "Pre-Order Special" which includes an A4 print with all books - well: pre-ordered before August. The book can be ordered here:

www.triplekite.co.uk

Some of the images from the book can be seen on Hans´ facebook page at

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hans-Strand-Artwork

and many more wonderful images, aerials and non-aerials alike, can be found on his website,

www.hansstrand.com

Highly recommended!
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad