Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Chicago Sunset  (Read 2385 times)
Dave (Isle of Skye)
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1065


Don't mistake lack of talent for genius.


WWW
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2012, 02:29:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Aha! I finally see the relevance of those "rude rollers" Dave posted and my OP photograph: the Sheraton tower resembles a roller! Such is the strange world of internet associations and forum meanderings! Wink

But surely Slobodan, that means yours is a "High Roller"..  Cheesy

Dave
Logged

Fine Art Photography on the Misty Isle of Skye
http://www.photography.info
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2012, 04:32:29 AM »
ReplyReply

s
From Wikipedia - Weegie or Weedgie is a slang term referring to people from Glasgow in Scotland, which is used as a noun or adjective. It is a contraction of the word Glaswegian, referring to people from Glasgow, although it may be used in some contexts to refer to any Scottish person who comes from anywhere south of Stonehaven.

An informal and, to some, insulting term in Scotland...
------------------
Also from Wikipedia - ...in Scotland, Bunnet is a rounded men's or women's cap with a small stiff brim in front.

Dave


Strictly applied, yes, that's right. It was usually meant to signify the working class man's cloth cap: the badge of the prole. However, even the toffs sometimes wore a version...

I've never heard of a Glaswegian being called a Weegie; on first reading I imagined it had something to do with golf. Strange. Neither have I really met a Glaswegian who was mean; if anything, I always felt they tended to more generosity than they could comfortably afford.

It's like most of those bloody heather 'n' haggis stereotypes: they are a figment of the Tourist Board imagination. The only times I ever saw kilts were at weddings. Oh - I once saw one being worn by a piper with a begging bowl up in the Trossachs.

But why ruin all the nonsense that has had so much money thrown at developing it?

Ah! I know! Embarrassment.

Rob C
« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 04:34:20 AM by Rob C » Logged

Dave (Isle of Skye)
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1065


Don't mistake lack of talent for genius.


WWW
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2012, 07:04:29 PM »
ReplyReply

It's like most of those bloody heather 'n' haggis stereotypes: they are a figment of the Tourist Board imagination. The only times I ever saw kilts were at weddings. Oh - I once saw one being worn by a piper with a begging bowl up in the Trossachs.

Well we do actually see men in kilts going about their day to day business on the IoS, not many of them I agree, but none the less still quite a few, so yes, it does still happen.

At the outer reaches of the island, there are still many remote areas inhabited by farming communities, no doubt owned for generations by the same clans. We are also finding that there are quite regular clan gatherings, where the Clan will come together from all over the world, for meetings on the IoS or one of the many smaller surrounding islands, followed by the inevitable kaylee.

But I do agree that the further south you go and nearer you get to the borders, then the more the kilts and the bagpipes are shown for the tourists and happy snappers. But when I first saw a quite elderly gentleman, in the depths of winter, wearing a kilt, then I knew it was the real deal. Also the real kilts that I have seen so far in day-to-day use, are not the brightly coloured tartan things that you see hanging in shop windows, I think those are more for the wealthier tourists and the weddings etc, no these kilts are actually quite drab with very muted colours.

Sorry Slobodan - I have really wandered off topic here haven't I?

Dave
Logged

Fine Art Photography on the Misty Isle of Skye
http://www.photography.info
Pages: « 1 [2]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad