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Author Topic: Chicago Sunset  (Read 2198 times)
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« on: September 09, 2012, 03:14:18 PM »
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Last rays of sun hitting the top floors of the Chicago Sheraton hotel, along the River Walk.

Taken with Canon G10. Every time I carry my DSLR and lenses, I complain of carrying all that bulky weight all day long and no picture in sight... and every time I take my p&s of choice (G10) instead, an opportunity presents itself and I complain that I did not take my DSLR with me. Such is life. Smiley


Chicago Sunset by Slobodan Blagojevic, on Flickr
« Last Edit: September 12, 2012, 11:48:14 AM by Slobodan Blagojevic » Logged

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RSL
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2012, 03:32:42 PM »
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Very nice, Slobodan.

And I do the same thing you do. I go out on the street with the D3 or D800 and, nothing. Then, I go out with the E-P1 and everything's out there. I come back with a batch of shots and wish I'd had a DSLR with me. But your G10 shot is fine, and the stuff I get with the E-P1 and its Summilux is fine. So, I guess I'll stop bitching about it.
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2012, 03:34:24 PM »
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There's a moral here, somewhere.

;-)

Rob C
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2012, 03:44:27 PM »
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It's the photographer, not the camera. At least you had a camera. Last night I went for a walk, didn't take a camera. The farmer had bailed up his hay & the round bales were wonderful abstract objects in the landscape, with the evening sun catching them just nicely. Would have made a lovely photograph <whistful sigh>

BTW, it's a great shot.
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2012, 03:52:27 PM »
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Bill, I hope you learn from experience. You just had a lesson.
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2012, 05:01:21 PM »
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Yes, I know. I've been looking lustfully at the Fuji X100, as a 'carry everywhere' camera. But then I thought of the cost, and the rumours of a 24MP Nikon D600, more affordable than the D800, a significant upgrade on my D700, and with which all I will need is a knotted handerkerchief, to remind me to carry the bloody thing with me when I go for a walk in the evening.
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Dave (Isle of Skye)
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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2012, 05:17:06 PM »
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It's the photographer, not the camera. At least you had a camera. Last night I went for a walk, didn't take a camera. The farmer had bailed up his hay & the round bales were wonderful abstract objects in the landscape, with the evening sun catching them just nicely. Would have made a lovely photograph <whistful sigh>

BTW, it's a great shot.

I find that the weight of the camera, is always far less than the weight of an opportunity lost.

Very nice shot Slobodan, and to see a shot like this with no sign of converging parallels or lens distortion is also quite a feat. Did you have to tweak it a little in LR4?

Dave
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2012, 05:59:44 PM »
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... to see a shot like this with no sign of converging parallels or lens distortion is also quite a feat. Did you have to tweak it a little in LR4?

Yes, automatic lens profile and -3 manual vertical distortion applied, though more to satisfy my anal-retentive side than it was really necessary.

The building itself is about 35 stories high. However, I was standing on a bridge, which is built on a street that is already one level above another street passing underneath. That is, my standpoint was close to the building's mid-height. In other words, instead of using a shift lens, I "shifted" myself up.  Wink  
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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2012, 06:08:34 PM »
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I just assumed that Slobodan could jump, really really high. Now I'm disappointed.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2012, 06:22:31 PM »
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I just assumed that Slobodan could jump, really really high. Now I'm disappointed.

 Grin
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2012, 06:55:49 PM »
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That's a nice one, SB!
I really enjoyed my G10 until it died.  Sad
I replaced it with an S95 which I try to remember to bring with me all the time. So generally I have it with me, except when there is a really good photo op, like your sunset.  Angry

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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2012, 11:58:09 PM »
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Right place, right time... well done!

Mike.
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Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2012, 03:00:08 AM »
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Yes, I know. I've been looking lustfully at the Fuji X100, as a 'carry everywhere' camera. But then I thought of the cost, and the rumours of a 24MP Nikon D600, more affordable than the D800, a significant upgrade on my D700, and with which all I will need is a knotted handerkerchief, to remind me to carry the bloody thing with me when I go for a walk in the evening.


Bill, it'll still end up being too heavy to carry around on spec. I play myelf the same record every day and the cameras, nonetheless, remain safely locked away from sight. The concept of a possible lost opportunity, when weighed against real discomfort, is a no brainer: the cellphone travels along for the ride every time.

I do think that a smaller solution will arrive, but I don't think it's here yet. Depending for vision on a visual aid that blacks out in strong sunlight is no sensible solution to anything unless you are a troglodyte. Which I am not, yet. Now, a Merrill(?) with a real viewfinder... a fixed focal length is no problem when you know what you generally want from a GP camera. Hell, real Jeeps are still collectibles!

Rob C

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Dave (Isle of Skye)
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« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2012, 06:06:18 AM »
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...more to satisfy my anal-retentive side than it was really necessary.

Yes I think we all suffer from that to various degrees and know that I definitely do. But then again I think applying infinite attention to even the most miniscule of detail, that the average Joe would never see or care about, is one of the main aspects of what really good photography is all about surely?

Dave Smiley
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Rob C
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« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2012, 08:45:45 AM »
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Like your bunnet, Dave, and I have one similar that I reserve for those wet, windy and withering winter days and nights we get every year. Well, for the days, mainly, as come nightfall I do the opposite of the vampires and stay at home. Trouble is, with little hair remaining to anchor it in place, it tends to slide towards the top of my head until such point that I resemble a passing pixie, which isn't at all the image I wish to project.

Come to think of it, the bandana exhibits much the same dynamic, and I have developed a habit of not so much tugging my imaginary forelock as at the edge of my bandana. I prefer it when it meets the top of my shades. I've little pride in exposing the worry lines.

Isn't photography remarkable?

Rob C
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Dave (Isle of Skye)
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« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2012, 12:52:45 PM »
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Like your bunnet, Dave..

Rob C

"Bunnet." That's a new word for me, is it a derivation of Bonnet by any chance? But yes I generally wear a hat when out shooting, even though I am fortunate enough at my time of life to still be sporting a full head of hair, when everyone I know went bald many years ago.

I have found if I keep my head warm, then I am warm. I have also tried various types of headgear over the years and the one I always return back to is the ratty old woolly hat that you see here. This woolly hat must be at least twenty years old if its a day. It has been around the world with me and I would miss it dearly if I lost it  Grin

I don't see the bandana thing at all, OK if you're a pirate, but to wear what is fundamentally a scarf tied in a bow around my head? Not on your Nelly...  Roll Eyes

Dave
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Rob C
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« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2012, 01:44:24 PM »
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Dave, you don't know bunnet? How long have you been in Scotland, then? Yes, read bonnet. On the other hand, maybe it's only heard in Glasgow or Paisley...

Bandanas. They are really useful items. In summer they absorb the sweat off the head and in winter they keep it slighty warm. Best of all, unlike a hat of any description, you're not expected to remove a bandana when you venture into a bar for a bite to eat, which means less stuff to forget when you leave. Baseball caps, the alternative for all seasons, offers more protection for the nose in high summer - dangerous stuff, sunlight - but live at high risk in the wind, where they can fly into the sea and be lost forever. I once had a straw hat do that, but I managed to hang over the wharf in time to catch it before it drifted away. That was then; such acrobatics are well out of contention today. But bandanas too have a critical size: too small and they don't tie properly; too large and they look like a woman's item. The single type I detest is the fake version with little tape ties.

;-)

Rob C

P.S. Not tied in a bow, Dave, tied in a reef knot. As you suggested, must not lose the piratical context.

P.P.S. That's a rather rude set of rollers that lady's wearing.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2012, 02:05:46 PM »
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Aha! I finally see the relevance of those "rude rollers" Dave posted and my OP photograph: the Sheraton tower resembles a roller! Such is the strange world of internet associations and forum meanderings! Wink
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Slobodan

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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2012, 02:14:31 PM »
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Digressing, I think 'bunnet' is more of a Weegie thing than it is something heard in the Western Isles
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Dave (Isle of Skye)
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« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2012, 02:28:01 PM »
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Digressing, I think 'bunnet' is more of a Weegie thing than it is something heard in the Western Isles

From Wikipedia - Weegie or Weedgie is a slang term referring to people from Glasgow in Scotland, which is used as a noun or adjective. It is a contraction of the word Glaswegian, referring to people from Glasgow, although it may be used in some contexts to refer to any Scottish person who comes from anywhere south of Stonehaven.

An informal and, to some, insulting term in Scotland...
------------------
Also from Wikipedia - ...in Scotland, Bunnet is a rounded men's or women's cap with a small stiff brim in front.

Dave
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