Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Wacom Intuos & LR4  (Read 7605 times)
jpegman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 100



« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2012, 04:33:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Absolutely, but , remember, the calibration is full tablet area = full monitor area, so a smaller tablet requires smaller movements for the same screen movements. Unlike a mouse which can be "speeded up" the tablet maps the monitor to it's full surface area - or else how would it know where you are?
Logged
John Caldwell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 440



« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2012, 04:38:14 PM »
ReplyReply

Good point. You can tell I've never used a tablet I guess..
Logged
jpegman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 100



« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2012, 04:52:17 PM »
ReplyReply

I guess one could "calibrate" the tablet to only use "part of the surface" (tape off an area?) - I don't know if the tablet calibration SW will allow this!  I'm going out for the night, so I can't try now, but, the other issue is desk real estate - if you have a large empty desktop (I don't) then there would be plenty of room for any size tablet and your keyboard, but if not, then the small tablet will have an added benefit to sit side by side or below your keyboard. The tablet can eliminate the mouse (if you let it) but, it cannot replace any keyboard functions.

I found it interesting that  the current touch sensitive Intuos 5 tablets no longer include a Wacom mouse (which all previous Wacom tablets did!) - but it seems to be an extra cost ($70) accessory if wanted for certain tasks.

Don't worry, with adequate desk space your present mouse will continue to work with both the keyboard and tablet loaded.
Logged
k bennett
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1417


WWW
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2012, 04:52:44 PM »
ReplyReply

I have a small tablet at home (the Bamboo -- run screaming in the other direction if you see one) and the large Intuos 3 at work. I MUCH prefer the larger table in part because of the whole arm movements -- this helps with my wrist and hand problems. YMMV.
Logged

Equipment: a camera and some lenses.
jpegman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 100



« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2012, 05:18:18 PM »
ReplyReply

I should have checked earlier - scaling for a smaller active area is possible (and recommended by Wacom - Technical Note: Setting a small active area within the tablet can help in reducing repetitive motion injuries to your wrist and elbow (See: Workspace Ergonomics).

Apparently, this was necessary for those with multiple monitors of different sizes!

http://www.automotiveillustrations.com/tutorials/wacom-drawing-tablet-tutorial.html
Logged
Jim Pascoe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 743


WWW
« Reply #25 on: September 12, 2012, 03:42:31 AM »
ReplyReply

I used to use the more basic Wacom in a small A6 size many years ago, and this was always alongside my keyboard where the mouse would have been.  When I changed over to a bigger Intuos 3 that was not practical and so I put the Tablet in front of the screen with the keyboardbehind it.  This almost put me back to square one with getting the coordination right again! Now I could not revert back.  Funny thing learning motor skills.  As John said though, when you start off put the mouse away and do everything with the tablet and pen.  It will be painful but it is the only way to learn I think.

Jim
Logged
Rand47
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 542


« Reply #26 on: September 12, 2012, 12:30:03 PM »
ReplyReply

Here's my history.  NEC 27" monitor (lots of real estate).  My first tablet was an Intuos 4 medium.  What I discovered quickly is that the pad is very much too large, even for "fine work" with the brush tool.  I ended up rescaling to an area that (quite by accident) is about exactly the size of the "small" Intuos tablets.  Lesson learned.  There's more to be gained by changing the image magnification than there is in having a large pad where it takes a lot of hand/pen movement.

BUT WAIT!  I then read about the Intuos 5, that can be used wirelessly with an extra little module from Wacom.  I bought the small size.  REVOLUTION.  The 5 models use "gestures" so that in addition to the pen / brush you also have what amounts to a huge "mouse pad."  This eliminates for me the back and forth from mouse for "some things" and pen for brushes.  I couldn't live w/o my I-5 now, and I wasn't particularly a fan of the I-4 due to its limited used for fine brush work w/ the adjustment brushes.

When I now add the greater range of controls available in LR4 "as brushes" (e.g. selective noise reduction) I find the I-5 being used even more than previously.  Mind you, all of this commentary coming from a "non-tablet" guy in general.

Before you pull the trigger on an I-4, be sure to check out the 5.  As for the buttons, another feature of the 5 that I like better is that when you hover/light press a button (all customizable, by the way for almost any key-stroke / function in LR) you get an "on screen display" of what action that button will produce if you actually push it.  At first I thought the lack of LCD labels on the buttons of the 5 a "take away" from the 4 model, but in actual use keeping my eye on the monitor turns out to be way better.
Logged
Ellis Vener
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1726



WWW
« Reply #27 on: September 12, 2012, 07:39:03 PM »
ReplyReply

I use a Wacom Intuous 5 with Lightroom everytime I use Lightroom... and Photoshop... and Word...and Chrome... and PTGui... and the list goes on.

The Intuous 5 is extremelyprogrammable and control input be either with the stylus and with both a single and multi-finger "gestures". In fact you use fingers and stylus simultaneously. Of course brush size and width are easily controlled.
Logged

Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
John Caldwell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 440



« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2012, 06:19:57 AM »
ReplyReply

Great to hear of a use for your "non-stylus hand" on the Intuos 5 models. Would sure love to see a video of an experienced user working with both hands on a model 5.

Regarding 5 users, have you found it worth buying the mouse accessory, or any other Wacom accessories?

Thanks to all for such a good discussion.

John Caldwell
Logged
john beardsworth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2642



WWW
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2012, 07:04:54 AM »
ReplyReply

John

The answer depends on what other programs you use other than ones like Phototshop/Lightroom, which are more suitable to the tablet, and you don't say that.

Also, I'd recommend buying the mouse you want, not one that happens to come from Wacom.

John
Logged

Rand47
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 542


« Reply #30 on: September 13, 2012, 04:32:12 PM »
ReplyReply

John

The answer depends on what other programs you use other than ones like Phototshop/Lightroom, which are more suitable to the tablet, and you don't say that.

Also, I'd recommend buying the mouse you want, not one that happens to come from Wacom.

John

I'll second this.  I use a Logitech mouse.  Works fine in conjunction w/ the I-5 when needed.  No need to spend money on the Wacom mouse if you already have one you like. 
Logged
jljonathan
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143


« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2012, 12:41:46 AM »
ReplyReply

Joe, Can you please list and describe the customizations that you have done with the tablet. It would help me figure out some other uses for it when working in LR/PS. Right now I only use the pen as a brush, but it sounds like you have taken more control of it for other uses that I would like to hear about. It might inspire me to use it more.
Logged
John Caldwell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 440



« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2012, 07:11:40 AM »
ReplyReply

For starters re customization, can stylus pressure be mapped to Adjustment Brush Flow in LR?
Logged
john beardsworth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2642



WWW
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2012, 10:57:03 AM »
ReplyReply

You can in the sense that you can customize what the computer recognizes as you pressing hard or pressing soft. It's not specifically-mapped to Lightroom.
Logged

John Caldwell
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 440



« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2012, 11:05:43 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks. I'll just need to start fooling with this to understand I'm sure. I was hoping that pressing hard vs. soft could be recognized as different in a PS or LR brush sense.
Logged
john beardsworth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2642



WWW
« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2012, 11:11:22 AM »
ReplyReply

Sorry, I think it may be possible. I was just setting the Express Keys (button on the tablet) for Lightroom 4.2 and saw that you can also set an application-specific "tip feel". I'm not sure why one would do so - for something intended to be intuitive, I think I'd want the tool to have similar responsiveness wherever I'm "painting".
« Last Edit: September 15, 2012, 02:40:11 AM by johnbeardy » Logged

wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5698



WWW
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2012, 01:02:30 AM »
ReplyReply

One more opinion (not mine)

http://www.mattk.com/2012/08/24/the-wacom-pen-tablet-that-i-swear-by/

Mike.

P.S. I'm left-handed but I taught myself from day one (the original Macs, remember those?) to use a mouse right-handed.  It works fine, but for mask selection in LR, I'd probably be better with a tablet and my left hand.  Been meaning to give one a shot.

Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
AFairley
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1129



« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2012, 11:15:50 AM »
ReplyReply

One more opinion (not mine)

http://www.mattk.com/2012/08/24/the-wacom-pen-tablet-that-i-swear-by/

Mike.

P.S. I'm left-handed but I taught myself from day one (the original Macs, remember those?) to use a mouse right-handed.  It works fine, but for mask selection in LR, I'd probably be better with a tablet and my left hand.  Been meaning to give one a shot.



I work the same way as the author in the link, anchor the heel of my hand and move the wrist to draw, move the hand carefully at the end of the stroke (unless I am painting or selecting a large area where accuracy is not required). So for me the small tablet is the best choice.
Logged

Jim Pascoe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 743


WWW
« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2012, 09:51:42 AM »
ReplyReply


Pretty much sums up how I feel about and use the tablet.

Jim
Logged
Edlet
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #39 on: September 24, 2012, 08:48:06 AM »
ReplyReply

John, it's like anything - it is what you get used to really.  I just find using a mouse very fatiguing for the back of my hand.  Using the Wacom has transformed my comfort.

Jim

Same here, if I were to use the Mouse for 3h straight on Lightroom, my wrist would start straining, switching between the pen and mouse works for me.
There are slight advantages for both the mouse and pen, a combination of both is the best.
Logged
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad