Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: The amazing beauty and geology of Roebuck Bay  (Read 1274 times)
Tony Jay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2142


« on: September 12, 2012, 07:23:06 AM »
ReplyReply

Quite a place.
Amazing diversity of rock types here.
I don't fully understand the diversity of rock types here - will have to read up.
Nonetheless, enjoy.

Regards

Tony Jay
Logged
francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6877


« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2012, 08:33:41 AM »
ReplyReply

I quite like the first photo. It has a very southwest-esque look (minus the red colored rocks). The second show those two magnificent trees but the red rocks in the background also tend to attract my eyes… The last one is relaxing, good textured rocks along with nice and soft  sky colors. Roebuck Bay seems like a tempting place!
Logged

Francois
Walt Roycraft
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 324



WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2012, 11:35:36 AM »
ReplyReply

The first one looks like an origami creation, very cool.
Logged

MTGFender
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 581


« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2012, 11:17:13 AM »
ReplyReply

Fantastic rock formation. Like the #2.
Logged
Paulo Bizarro
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1635


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2012, 03:24:20 AM »
ReplyReply

As a geologist, and looking at the photos, #3 seem to be stromatolites, the result of algal mound edifications. They end up lloking like bath tubs upside down. These algae have been doing this stuff for hundreds of millions of years, and keep doing it at present day.

In fact, Shark Bay in Australia is often cited as a modern day analogue for these things, where one can look at present day structures.

Nice lighting on the photos too!
Logged

Tony Jay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2142


« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2012, 05:26:27 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for the comments Paulo.

Apparently most of the geology of this region of Australia consists of layered sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone, with a thick layer of blood red sand on top.
I also found some very interesting rippled rock that appeared to be limestone as well, but may not be since the patterns probably indicate a sedimentary origin.
I am not sure whether there are examples of old stromatolite formation in this are or not, however, I must admit that stromatolites did not cross my mind viewing these rock formations at all.

Regards

Tony Jay
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad