Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Koenigspitze Mountain (Italy)  (Read 3143 times)
ncaleffi
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: September 27, 2012, 06:07:15 AM »
ReplyReply

This is Koenigspitze Mountain in Northern Italy. An evidence of the snow retiring - once this was a glacier. Comments and critique are welcome!

Thanks,
Nicola.

Logged
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1567


WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 06:37:01 AM »
ReplyReply

Bloody hell! I was last there about 20 odd years ago, and there was definitely a glacier there then. I'll have to hunt through my old Kodachromes & look for a shot showing it. There's just that last remnant hanging in the corrie - it used to cover that whole far right side of the frame. The moraine visible to the right of the hut just wasn't to be seen.
Logged

Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2045


Editing Allowed


« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2012, 08:53:58 AM »
ReplyReply

Sad to see this happening. I've seen the results of the "imaginary" global warming the last few trips I've made to Alaska. I say imaginary as some folks have their heads so far up their derrieres, they can no longer see anything.

Nice B&W, by the way. Beautiful handling of the sky.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
Hulyss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 504



WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 02:11:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Very nice photo. Being from Chamonix, in France, I can say that global warming is not a legend ... Cry
Logged

Kind Regards - www.hulyssbowman.com
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1878


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2012, 09:00:54 AM »
ReplyReply

^ Agreed. It is blatantly obvious in the glaciers of Washington State and the vast majority of the planet’s glaciers as well.

And then there all the scientific papers on the topic, etc.
Logged

Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2883


« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2012, 12:50:36 PM »
ReplyReply

What sequence of photographs could show the peaking of world oil production?
« Last Edit: September 28, 2012, 01:37:24 PM by Isaac » Logged
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1878


WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2012, 10:28:21 AM »
ReplyReply

^Not sure if a reduction in petroleum products or fresh water availability will be the key challenge representing the next major phase of human development. Both phenomena appear to be looming.  I guess the tell will be if mass migrations due to drought starts before people abandon their cars.

If I had a functional crystal ball, I would predict that nuclear powered desalination plants using TerraPower’s traveling wave reactions will start popping up before too long. That will help solve the fresh water problem, for some.

Good to see you posting, Isaac.
Logged

Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2883


« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2012, 11:02:13 AM »
ReplyReply

In my very limited understanding, the problem is not likely to be reduction in petroleum products but the end of cheap fuel, and the ripple of that escalating cost throughout the global economy, creating uncertainty about future profitability (aka credit for new large-scale projects).

I'm coming to the realization that I will probably live to experience these events.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2012, 11:09:17 AM by Isaac » Logged
Rand47
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 568


« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2012, 11:14:14 AM »
ReplyReply

No worries, we're headed for a demographic winter. 

Nice photo, by the way.
Logged
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1878


WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2012, 10:20:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
In my very limited understanding, the problem is not likely to be reduction in petroleum products but the end of cheap fuel, and the ripple of that escalating cost throughout the global economy, creating uncertainty about future profitability (aka credit for new large-scale projects).

Agreed, but increased cost amounts to a different path of reaching about the same result – fuel cost that many cannot afford. I guess a key difference would be hysteria following a general agreement of peak oil production being reached or past.

Of course, no one knows if or when peak oil will occur. Differing theories continue to push the timeline back, and advancing capabilities help to economically produce more crude from existing sites.

But the continual increase in cost will have nearly the same effect on use as will a reduction in availability. For instance, look at the pattern of oil use around 2008, when cost reached nearly $150 per barrel of crude. As oil cost increased, the cost of food increased right along with it, as did the cost of nearly everything else. It won’t require an announcement that peak oil capacity has occurred to cause prices to double that amount or more. All that would be required is the perception of significant damage to the distribution chain or major political unrest to cause prices to double almost overnight. And then there is trhe issue of widespread financial speculation on crude. That too will happen again.

Quote
I'm coming to the realization that I will probably live to experience these events.

I dunno your age but both of these issues are already causing problems, which escalate into some major challenges over the next couple of decades. IMO, of course.
Logged

Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2045


Editing Allowed


« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2012, 10:38:07 AM »
ReplyReply

The problems are going to come from Russia when they begin to realize they no longer have a corner on the natural gas industry and when the rest of the oil producing world realizes the US is no longer dependent upon them. Let the games begin...I'll probably be dust when it gets real ugly but I do feel for my kids and grandkid.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2883


« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2012, 12:43:32 PM »
ReplyReply

... when the rest of the oil producing world realizes the US is no longer dependent upon them ...

The US will no longer be dependent on the rest of the oil producing world because...?
Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2883


« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2012, 12:51:31 PM »
ReplyReply

...the continual increase in cost will have nearly the same effect on use as will a reduction in availability...
Exactly, but so much sooner - the global economy is predicated on cheap transportation.

I dunno your age but...
I'd be in my mid-70's in 2035.
Logged
Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2045


Editing Allowed


« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2012, 01:12:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Because we are producing at such an accelerated rate, we should be importing less than 30% of our oil by 2030. Also, we are one of the leading natural gas exporters in the world today thanks to shale gas...bunches of it in there, easy to extract.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2883


« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2012, 10:06:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Because we are producing at such an accelerated rate, we should be importing less than 30% of our oil by 2030.
US domestic production has increased, but as big a factor is the decline in consumption "primarily as a result of rising energy prices"  (and of course the financial crisis recession).

Projected 36% net imports in 2035 sounds a lot like still being dependent on the rest of the oil producing world.

Also, we are one of the leading natural gas exporters in the world today thanks to shale gas...bunches of it in there, easy to extract.
The June 25, 2012 Annual Energy Outlook reports the US was a net importer of natural gas in 2010 and was projected to become a net exporter around 2020.

Compared to conventional gas reservoirs, shale gas is not easy or cheap to extract.
Logged
muntanela
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 244



« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2012, 05:30:09 AM »
ReplyReply



Nice, but  there is too much sky, really too much without clouds.

P.S. It has also an italian name: Gran Zebrù  (by the way).
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad