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Author Topic: Fashion? No Rules for Success  (Read 1026 times)
BenjaminKanarek
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« on: October 01, 2012, 02:16:14 PM »
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Over the past few months, I have received several e-mails from photographers, several stylists, make-up artists and hair stylists asking me how to break in to the industry and to make living in it.  Or to be more specific, is there a secret magic bullet for making it in this metier?

To be quite honest, there is no secret formula or system for success in the business. In fact the more time I spend in it the more often I am surprised by how not structured it is and how haphazard and chaotic it really is.

It has become more apparent to me than ever that the one rule of thumb I am certain of is the lack of certitude  that exists in this and pretty well all of the art forms.  What I can say with a certain amount of confidence and I have said this before, Marketing is probably the most important aspect of gaining success in anything that rely's on "viralness" to succeed. In fact breaking the rules is a rule one might consider employing to break in to this highly unstructured metier.  But I guess, that isn't really news and most of the artists that have succeeded did stuff that went against the grain and left a very powerful and often pungent impression with those that were affected by the promotional scheme.


Persistence, intestinal fortitude and a I don't give a shit what you think attitude used to work, but since the multi nationals control so much of the industry, being aware of what you say and the diplomacy of the delivery is so important, that kind of abandonment approach might be more suicidal than anything else, as witnessed just recently by a rather important pret a porter design house in regards to tourists.  It is that kind of faux pas that can have a life changing affect on the success or failure of your enterprise.

Pardon the regression, but it really is pertinent. The manner in which one succeeds is so subjective, that all one can do is tell the story of how one did what they did and when and how and what was the outcome than saying this is how it IS done.

My only advice would be, just follow your own route and don't be afraid to test the waters. Treat people with the same semblance of respect you would expect people to treat you.  Return your phone calls. Keep your appointments and be a good listener. That's about all I can say for now.  Oh, don't be afraid to break the molds, without stepping on the mold makers toes...If that is at all possible.  If it isn't, make your own mold and create your own scene.

Oh, if I have any other stuff to add, I will when something comes to mind.

Another spontaneous essay by your truly...

http://www.benjaminkanarekblog.com/4y3c
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IanBrowne
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2012, 08:30:17 PM »
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whenever I'm asked what photography course are best I usually answer with any good business management and marketing courses.

So happy to be out of the working side of photography and back driving roadtrains (bloody big 40/50 meter long  113 tons trucks). Sadly the photography motivation has dropped right off ATM.
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2012, 03:16:44 AM »
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whenever I'm asked what photography course are best I usually answer with any good business management and marketing courses.

So happy to be out of the working side of photography and back driving roadtrains (bloody big 40/50 meter long  113 tons trucks). Sadly the photography motivation has dropped right off ATM.


In that case, Ian, you're in the wrong place if you seek fresh motivation: that can only come from yourself, and external advice merely provides an account of someone else's mindset.

In my own mind, I've come to a vaguish conclusion that photography may not, actually, be ours for life. It's fairly well accepted that even most of the 'stars' seem to have a brief ten-or-so years of greatest output, after which time, they either lose the motivation or simply exhaust the possibilities within themselves. The way that manifests itself seems to be that those with a very full work schedule do it rapidly within the ten or fifteen years, and those with lesser workloads manage to spread approximately the same volume of work over a wider period of time. But, either way, the honey is in limited supply. That's my take on pros; for amateurs, I don't suppose they ever reach the saturation point by dint of time alone.

Rob C
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IanBrowne
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2012, 05:45:20 AM »
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In that case, Ian, you're in the wrong place if you seek fresh motivation: that can only come from yourself, and external advice merely provides an account of someone else's mindset.

In my own mind, I've come to a vaguish conclusion that photography may not, actually, be ours for life. It's fairly well accepted that even most of the 'stars' seem to have a brief ten-or-so years of greatest output, after which time, they either lose the motivation or simply exhaust the possibilities within themselves. The way that manifests itself seems to be that those with a very full work schedule do it rapidly within the ten or fifteen years, and those with lesser workloads manage to spread approximately the same volume of work over a wider period of time. But, either way, the honey is in limited supply. That's my take on pros; for amateurs, I don't suppose they ever reach the saturation point by dint of time alone.

Rob C
I appreciate the thoughts Rob. The lack of motivation has a bit to do with "what will I do with more photos", but there is also a bit to do the area I live in ATM. This place (Google Broken Hill Aust) is very isolated and the country side rather boring photographically. One can only take so any photos of flattish  plains and sunsets/rises; and I have been visiting the area for over 10 years before work had me living here. I have been fiddling with photography for over forty years and I know the journey is not finished just yet. Next week the new Panasonic 200 arrives and that it's self will open the eyes to more challenges although I ordered the camera more out of curiously. A 27-600 2.8 Lens is getting closer to the holy grail IMO. Now all they need is add the lens to a small FF camera with a proper view finder LOL.

My apologies to the OP (Benjamin) as I have taken thread a bit of subject.    
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Rob C
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« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2012, 08:23:32 AM »
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"My apologies to the OP (Benjamin) as I have taken thread a bit of subject."


There's not a lot fresh or valuable anyone can add to the OP; the career in fashion isn't what folks here seek, and those of us who've been there know better than to ask anyone else. It's different for everyone - easy for some, the challenges of a lifetime for others.

Take care

Rob C   
 
 
 
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