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Author Topic: Best Way To Remove Tan Lines?  (Read 4997 times)
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« on: October 03, 2012, 03:08:03 PM »
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What is the best way to remove (blend in) bikini-strap tan lines from the chest and shoulders of a bride in Photoshop (CS6) or Lightroom (LR4)?
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Slobodan

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john beardsworth
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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2012, 03:42:10 PM »
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Have you tried any of the contact-aware tools in Photoshop? Mainly the healing brush, and contact aware fill. On a separate layer and with "sample all layers" active.
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Richowens
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2012, 05:58:52 PM »
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John,

 Don't you mean content aware?

Rich
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davidh202
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2012, 08:10:34 PM »
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  The way I blend tan lines in CS5 ...
1 - dupe your layer then create a blank layer above it
2 - using a soft low -opacity brush take a color sampling (at 5 x 5) from a dark area close to the bright area.
3 - paint over the light areas and blend them out in with multiple samplings. you may have to adjust opacity till you get the feel of how much color your painting in. (remember to be working in a seperate layer for all the painting).
I get color selections by pressing the alt key and  left clicking (Windows).
4 - go to filter-noise -add noise, and add some monochromatic (gaussian) noise to give some texture back over the painted area adjust the amount to your liking to blend.
you can always go back to the layer fill opacity and fine tune some more.
That does the trick for me.
You can also sometimes use content aware fill, as long as you  isolate the areas you don't want content aware to sample by seperating them with a selection and mask.
Very Quick SOOC before after Example below. I could have refined it much more with time ;-)
David


 
« Last Edit: October 03, 2012, 09:28:51 PM by davidh202 » Logged
john beardsworth
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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2012, 02:42:20 AM »
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John,

 Don't you mean content aware?

Rich
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Bryan Conner
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2012, 03:23:29 AM »
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What is the best way to remove (blend in) bikini-strap tan lines from the chest and shoulders of a bride in Photoshop (CS6) or Lightroom (LR4)?

Nude sunbathing!  Grin I could not resist.  Roll Eyes  Sorry....now back to work. 
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2012, 04:07:31 AM »
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What is the best way to remove (blend in) bikini-strap tan lines from the chest and shoulders of a bride in Photoshop (CS6) or Lightroom (LR4)?

Hi Slobodan,

Not necessarily the best, but it works (in Photoshop):
  • Create a blank new layer above the layer you want to correct.
  • Add a black mask to that layer.
  • Sample the darker skin next to the tanline and fill the new layer, not the mask, with that color.
  • Change the layer blending mode to Linear burn.
Now paint on the mask with a large (tanline size) soft white brush and a low opacity, building slowely up to the right density, and if necessary tweak the opacity.

The benefit of a mask is of course that you can undo any mistakes by darkening the mask, and the Linear burn retains original skin texture.

Just one of many approaches.

Cheers,
Bart
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 05:01:21 AM by BartvanderWolf » Logged
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2012, 03:38:20 PM »
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Thanks all for the contributions so far. I just got my CS6 and must admit a couple of things are new to me (all that content-aware stuff), given that my last used (rarely) version has been CS4. I was just hoping there is something easier in LR4 Smiley
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Slobodan

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davidh202
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2012, 07:26:14 PM »
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While content aware is very good, it is not the panacea for all we would like it to be,or Adobe would like us to believe in their sales pitches.
You can learn to use it effectively for many things, with practice.
Using it with smaller portions of the image at one time, or masking out portions of images you don't want it to sample, is a very good way to control it's usefulness ;-).

David
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john beardsworth
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« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2012, 05:02:08 AM »
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Panacea, no, but first choice, yes. It can be astonishingly effective and quick to use. Just work on a separate layer and check "sample all layers" .

Slobodan, you'll find content aware features in these places:

In the toolbar:
- Spot Healing Brush - content aware option
- Patch tool
- Content aware move tool

Menu commands
- Edit >Fill > Use - content aware option
- Edit > Content Aware Scale - for clever stretching and squashing images

Any others? I think that's all.

John
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2012, 08:15:50 AM »
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Just work on a separate layer and check "sample all layers" .

Hi John,

Actually it is better to use Content Aware Fill on a separate layer, with the distracting/dissimilar features masked out, and only sample from that layer. When dissimilar features are not masked out (as when using "sample all layers), then rubbish can show up in the fill area. Content aware fill is not perfect, but it does an amazing job that usually beats cloning and such, 9 times out of 10.

Cheers,
Bart
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john beardsworth
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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2012, 09:28:50 AM »
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Yes, I agree for Fill. Apart from anything else, it doesn't have a sample all layers option (and whines if you try to use it on a transparent layer).
John
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2012, 10:37:22 AM »
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Yes, I agree for Fill. Apart from anything else, it doesn't have a sample all layers option (and whines if you try to use it on a transparent layer).

Hi John,

Here's how.

  • Make a duplicate layer.
  • On that layer make a selection of what to replace, and add all potential stuff to replace it with.
  • Now add a layer mask to that layer, based on keeping those selections.
  • On that masked layer select the part that needs to be replaced.
  • Use Content Aware Fill, but select the Sample option as shown in the attached image.
  • Click OK, and the selected area is replaced with only the intended features.
  • Disable or Delete the mask, and voila!

Cheers,
Bart
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john beardsworth
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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2012, 11:14:24 AM »
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Not quite the same thing!
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