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Author Topic: Which Paper & Paper Finishes to Use When  (Read 1295 times)
Robert_In_MS
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« on: October 11, 2012, 12:17:06 PM »
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I just bought a R3000 because I wanted a very good photo printer along with all the paper profiles I needed.  I was tired of limited profiles or the need to pay to have a custom profile made for the regular printer I have.

I am an amateur photographer but not new to the computer end, color workflow etc. I use LR4 and PS CS6, NEC monitors, profiled regularly with an Eye1, the correct printer & paper profiles, decent full spectrum lighting so everything matches nicely except for the usual slightly darker print (fixed with a final mask in CS6 or +6 in the photo LR module).  I also know how to technically use my camera, ISO, aperture/depth, WB (though I shoot RAW), histogram, etc.

I bought the sample pack from RR papers and printed similar images on glossy, lustre, satin, linen, canvas etc. papers and can see the significant differences in the photos with the different finishes, I even adjusted for smaller gamuts and what would have been washed out on some of the fine art papers.  So now, for the more artistic and what I know to be a subjective and personal taste question by this very literal engineer...

What paper (texture, whiteness/warmth, brightness) for particular subjects,  ... 
 Portraits (I know some pros use canvas)
 Sunsets
 Well Lit Landscapes
 Shadowy Landscapes
 Photos with "flat" water.. Such as harbors with boats
 Water with waves

Any other nice matches one can think of, for example...
  "I like to use matte papers with ?? photos"

I have looked around allot and can't seem to find this kind of advise.

Thanks-Robert
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GaryBarker
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2012, 03:55:44 PM »
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Robert,
Send me your address and I would be happy to send to you a Signature Worthy sample pack of papers from Epson at no cost to you. If you like them, just call me in the future as I would like the opportunity to work with you. Thank you!
Gary
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Gary Barker
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neile
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« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2012, 05:48:27 PM »
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We had a thread on this very topic not too long ago that you may find useful: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=69854.msg553479#msg553479.

Neil
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Neil Enns
Dane Creek Folio Covers. Limited edition Tuscan Sun and Citron covers are now in stock!
MarkH2
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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2012, 11:39:21 PM »
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I highly recommend this essay by Michael Reichmann, "Battle of the Barytas."  Addresses matte vs glossy papers.  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/printers/baryta.shtml

This may pique your interest.  From his conclusion:

"Until quite recently the industry simply didn’t provide a very attractive palette of non-matte offerings that weren’t at the same time very high gloss, but it did provide some truly artistic matte papers which much of the North American and European photographic community, me included, found to our liking. As I mentioned above, what they lacked in DMax and gamut, they offered in “character”, and if properly printed – quality images.

"Though I have been printing on matte fine art papers such as Hahnemuhle Photo Rag for the past few years, I think that my days with matte papers and matte black ink are now over.

"Frankly, it's about time!"
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robgo2
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2012, 11:03:24 AM »
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I highly recommend this essay by Michael Reichmann, "Battle of the Barytas."  Addresses matte vs glossy papers.  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/printers/baryta.shtml

This may pique your interest.  From his conclusion:

"Until quite recently the industry simply didn’t provide a very attractive palette of non-matte offerings that weren’t at the same time very high gloss, but it did provide some truly artistic matte papers which much of the North American and European photographic community, me included, found to our liking. As I mentioned above, what they lacked in DMax and gamut, they offered in “character”, and if properly printed – quality images.

"Though I have been printing on matte fine art papers such as Hahnemuhle Photo Rag for the past few years, I think that my days with matte papers and matte black ink are now over.

"Frankly, it's about time!"



Curiously, I find myself moving in the opposite direction.  After several years of printing exclusively on glossy/semiglossy paper, I grew tired of the surface reflections, which effectively negate the higher Dmax and wider color gamut.  Now, I am printing on Epson Hot Press Natural and Canson Rag Photographique mainly.  I love them for the fact that their smooth, non-reflective surfaces virtually disappear, imparting images with a wonderful depth and richness.  Dmax and color gamut don't seem to matter much.  Few of my prints get framed;  I view and display them in the hand, if that matters.

Rob
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Robert_In_MS
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2012, 05:21:54 PM »
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Thanks Folks!  I will have to just  waste Wink some ink on that new printer to see what I like.   I really appreciate the starting thoughts, particularly the "Hard on Hard, Soft on Soft" suggestion from the previous discussion.

Gary has been kind enough to give me an Epson Signature Sample Pack plus a sheet of Ultra Lustre and Ultra Matte for me to compare (Buy from GARY!). Between that and the RR paper samples I should get a good feeling for what I like.

Robert
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