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Author Topic: Prints coming out much darker than on the monitor  (Read 10911 times)
digitaldog
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« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2012, 09:04:00 AM »
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My uncertainty is where does the eye/brain start to fail to compensate and what to do then? I'm thinking about prints destined for the dim restaurant walls, and longe rooms lit by a couple of shaded lamps.

I don't know there's an easy answer here and I suspect image content may play a role when the viewing illuminant is very low.

Next time you go to such a restaurant, be interesting to observe how the prints look after you've been accustomed to the environment. Then see if the owner would let you take the print to another area, better illuminated and see how it appears. Might look just fine. Our eyes and visual system have a incredible ability to adapt to viewing conditions. And again, keep in mind this is not as complicated a visual experience than having a very bright display and a print that we hope to visually match together and in context. The reason I suspect that until very recently, this issue hasn't been in the news <g>
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
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Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2012, 01:54:13 PM »
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My uncertainty is where does the eye/brain start to fail to compensate and what to do then? I'm thinking about prints destined for the dim restaurant walls, and longe rooms lit by a couple of shaded lamps. Do you then reach for a curves compensation to lighten the print (or even Matt's maligned slider in LR)?

How is it the daily comics can be read and spotted from across the room even when it's printed on the dullest paper stock in existence and viewed under living room to subway light? It's because the rendering is black ink on white paper which doesn't mean the image was made to look brighter but more contrasty.

Composition and the placement of darks and lights also attracts and communicates ideas. Cartoonist Milton Caniff's "Terry and the Pirates" and "Steve Canyon" demonstrates a masterful example of how composition (placement of blacks and whites) can grab the eye with just black ink on paper no matter the lighting conditions and the paper it's printed on.

For instance I wouldn't want to display in a dimly lit restaurant a print depicting a deer standing far away in a deep dark forest as a way to communicate the serenity of nature. I'ld display a close up of a deer foraging in a brightly lit field of pale green sawgrass.

It's the appearance of contrast that gives the impression of brightness and that's determined by image content as Andrew pointed out.

As another example, what's being communicated in the following linked image?...

The child's emotional state, right?...

http://www.animationresources.org/pics/caniffteaser2.jpg

It's meant to look dark with all that black ink but the idea is simply related by the use of composition even when it's this small viewed on the web.

Most amateur photographers don't think like this especially when all they want is to just take a picture and hang it on a wall.

Another one that's meant to look dark...

http://madinkbeard.com/blog/wp-content/images/caniff2.gif
« Last Edit: November 11, 2012, 02:07:00 PM by tlooknbill » Logged
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