Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: got an inexpensive 500cm and want a digital back at some time. what choices?  (Read 852 times)
hsteeves
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« on: October 17, 2012, 12:51:20 PM »
ReplyReply

ever since I started picking up some blad lenses to put on other things, I've been looking for an inexpensive body.  Found a 500cm.
Now, I don't want to spend a fortune but I would like to put a digital back on it.  I do almost all my shooting outdoors so would want something I didn't need to tether.  Another thing is I also would want to be able to put the back on my GX 680.  See, I'm not picky.  And I figure that since the MFDB people on here are probably the smartest on the net, who better to give me some guidance.
Logged
Doug Peterson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2767


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2012, 01:06:40 PM »
ReplyReply

My suggestion would be to make yourself a list (here or offline) of what matters to you and to what extent.

Without some indication of what's important to you might as well be saying "I want to get dinner, and sit outside, but not spend more than $30/entree." - you'll get lots of well intended and intelligent suggestions, but they may or may apply to you.

The more specific the question you pose to the forum the more relevant the answers you get back will be.

Does lowest ISO matter? How much?
Does highest ISO matter? How much?
Does ability to use it on a tech camera matter? (now or in the future)
How much does viewfinder crop (1.0, 1.1, or 1.3 from the long side of the 6x6) matter?
Does long exposure matter? What could you live with? What would you be very happy with?
Does the ability to mount it both vertically or horizontally matter?
Have you seen the 680 Kapture Group adapter system? Are you ok with using it, as compared to a system with less cables/batteries/settings?
Have you used Capture One or Phocus? Best results with any back will be had in it's native software; what do you think of each software?
Does warranty matter to you?
Would it be helpful to get training and expert advice on using the back or do you prefer to go it on your own? 
Logged

DOUG PETERSON (dep@digitaltransitions.com), Digital Transitions
Dealer for Phase One, Mamiya Leaf, Arca-Swiss, Cambo, Profoto
Office: 877.367.8537
Cell: 740.707.2183
Phase One IQ250 FAQ
hsteeves
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012, 01:14:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Its mostly about sticking a back on a camera(s) so that I can get instant gratification - one day, I will get around to processing all that film in my fridge.  I shoot mainly landscapes so high ISOs may not be of major importance however longer shutter speeds would be nice.  Depending on the back, I'm hoping I may not have to go the Kapture Group route.  Training? you mean you can get training on these things? I have been training myself so that may be one of my issues.
Logged
torger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1407


« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012, 01:32:49 PM »
ReplyReply

I guess you want cheap, so one of the older untethered 22 megapixel backs is probably a good start, Hasselblad CF22, Leaf Aptus 22, Phase One P25. Maybe even a 16 megapixel square back would do like CFV-16, but there are not many of the out on the second hand market. An older 22 megapixel back should be say 2000 - 3000 on individual-to-individual second hand market, and about 4000+VAT at a dealer. Newer incarnations of 22 megapixel backs like the P25+ are significantly more expensive. The older backs can be a bit of a minefield concerning features, many have some odd behaviors which one might not be prepared for if used to more recent digital cameras. I would think the Leaf Aptus 22 is the one that feels most modern of those mentioned, notable is its low base ISO though, ISO25 while most are at ISO50.

Long shutter speeds is generally bad news, if you need long for real (many minutes or more) you need P25+ or P45+, and then you get to pay some extra, they have high second hand prices partly due to their long exposure capability. If you can do with 30 seconds the Aptus will be okay, although you need to clean up a zillion of hot pixels (which raw converter does quite well, so it is not a big issue).

I guess you need V-mount for the hasselblad. I don't know much about adapters for the GX680, but in general with adapters is that they can be hard to come by and they can be really expensive if bought from some old stock somewhere.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2012, 01:35:32 PM by torger » Logged
Doug Peterson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2767


WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 01:35:46 PM »
ReplyReply

Its mostly about sticking a back on a camera(s) so that I can get instant gratification - one day, I will get around to processing all that film in my fridge.  I shoot mainly landscapes so high ISOs may not be of major importance however longer shutter speeds would be nice.  Depending on the back, I'm hoping I may not have to go the Kapture Group route.  Training? you mean you can get training on these things? I have been training myself so that may be one of my issues.

A good dealer has both the technical and real world experience to help you understand the abilities and limitations of your system, and how to get the most out of it. For instance I recently spent an afternoon covering long exposure with one of our customers who shoots scenes of private city life from outside of building threw their windows. We covered all the things you might find buried in the forums (e.g. longest spec'd exposure only applies at base ISO, ambient temperature matters a lot, taking a break between several long exposures will allow heat to dissipate) as well as spending significant time in Photoshop and Capture One showing her what processing settings and workflow chain I've found are helpful as you push the limits of the long exposure.

We've recently opened a Remote Demo Center [video, audio, screen sharing, and raw file sharing] wherein we can assist our customers regardless of where they are.

You absolutely do not have to go it on your own.

That said this forum is also an excellent place to seek advice. I try very hard to provide honest, comprehensive answers to our customers, but I am only one point of view and getting a diversity of views is always a good idea. Again, if you want good advice from the forum though you should provide the forum as much detail about what you're looking for and what your priorities are.
Logged

DOUG PETERSON (dep@digitaltransitions.com), Digital Transitions
Dealer for Phase One, Mamiya Leaf, Arca-Swiss, Cambo, Profoto
Office: 877.367.8537
Cell: 740.707.2183
Phase One IQ250 FAQ
TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 02:03:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Doug (Phase) and Yair (Leaf) are straight shooters. 

I know you want an untethered solution, but the H25 is cheap.  If you could find a Sinar 54m, they are cheap, but also tethered.  I used to assist a lady who shot 501cm and 503cw Blads with a Sinar 54m.  We shot outdoors, on location with no power, all the time.  Ran off of a Mac G4 Powerbook.  Not sure if it will run with the newer Macs.  The 54m files are outstanding.

Really, I think any of the 22mpx backs are great on a 500 series Blad.  Focusing can be a paid, and the older teh blad the more likely its been banged around a bit and may not be trued up t square, either for the back or the screen.  Blad used to do a "tune up" program wher ethey would adjust everything to true.  I'd get a Acute-Matt-D screen as well and have a pro install it in your 500.  The 500 has a frame that is a pain in the ass to deal with and needs to be taken apart and reassembled without breaking the glass.  Its not an easy job.  All of this will cost about $700, assuming you buy a new screen.

Good luck and keep us posted.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad