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Author Topic: FocusTune AF Micro Adjust software  (Read 10536 times)
Ellis Vener
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« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2012, 08:47:47 PM »
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I've now tried it with one lens - but not withthe exact method Tapes recommends: no dark background, didn't check to see if JPEG sharpening and all other settings except "high contrast were zeroed out   and did not defocus slightly between shots. The results were better and far faster than doing it by eye but still needed some very slight hand tuning. The software recommended +11, but real world shots look better at +8).  I used my Lens Align Mark II target.

I just did a quick shot at each AF micro-adjust setting and not a more complex set of tests that are needed for the other features in in the software.

No problems downloading  but had to let OS X 10.8.2 security system (sandbox?) know that it was okay to run the software even though it was not an  Apple approved app or from an approved developer. Once installed there were no problems with FocalTune  on an i5 iMac running Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8.2)  Camera: EOS 1D X and 135mm f/2.

The manual is at http://www.mediafire.com/view/?393tundt11namrf if you are interested.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 01:15:35 PM by Ellis Vener » Logged

Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
francois
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« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2012, 06:22:38 AM »
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I've nopw tried it with one lens - but not withthe exact method Tapes recommends: no dark background, didn't check to see if JPEG sharpening and all other settings except "high contrast were zeroed out   and did not defocus slightly between shots. The results were better and far faster than doing it by eye but still needed some very slight hand tuning. The software recommended +11, but real world shots look better at +8).  I used my Lens Align Mark II target.

I just did a quick shot at each AF micro-adjust setting and not a more complex set of tests that are needed for the other features in in the software.

No problems downloading  but had to let OS X 10.8.2 security system (sandbox?) know that it was okay to run the software even though it was not an  Apple approved app or from an approved developer. Once installed there were no problems with FocalTune  on an i5 iMac running Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8.2)  Camera: EOS 1D X and 135mm f/2.

The manual is at http://www.mediafire.com/view/?393tundt11namrf if you are interested.

I tested with a couple of lenses on my 1Ds3. I had no dark background but defocused the lens between each shot. For those two lenses, I came to the same settings I got while using LensAlign. I must say that using FocusTune was much faster and more convenient than LensAlign.
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Francois
Ellis Vener
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« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2012, 01:23:09 PM »
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I sent Michael  Tape's an email summarizing what I did and that I should have RTFM first.

He wrote back with following quick set of instructions for doing it properly:

1. Setup target (LensAlign if possible) and camera.

2. Set camera settings as recommended.

3.Shoot 4 shots each at +20, +15, +10, +5, 0. -5, -10, -15, -20 (defocus slightly to the same direction between shots.

4. Run through FocusTune.

5. Based on results now shoot around the best AFA value (if -10 and -15 were top) shoot -9 through -16 (or whatever seems appropriate.

6) Run through FT.

7. Pick best value...look at LensAlign source shot to see how DOF lays, and select best value for your shooting style.

You must shoot 4 or more shots per AFA setting as the cameras are not consistent enough to judge by 1 shot. And FT will show you the averages and individual values together on the one graph.

Please watch the video. it is VERY rough and will be replaced in the next day or 2, but the concepts are shown. You can skip to 4 minutes if you like.


Video link: http://vimeo.com/52093690

All info is discussed at the info center link below.
http://mtd.forumatic.com/viewforum.php?f=12
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
wildlightphoto
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« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2012, 04:56:28 AM »
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It's perfectly excusable if you want affordable cameras.

What good is affordable if it's not usable?  How much is your time to fix the problem worth?




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Rhossydd
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« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2012, 05:04:31 AM »
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What good is affordable if it's not usable?
I've never heard anyone say their camera is "unusable" without MFA.
Most DSLRs don't have MFA and people have been happy enough with them.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2012, 12:51:37 PM »
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What good is affordable if it's not usable?  How much is your time to fix the problem worth?
Every cinema quality rental house I know of spends the time to check and calibrate lenses to camera bodies before they go out for rental.

Your question about time is valid but if you are that busy or your day job pays you that much your assistants should be doing this for you.

I think a far better question is: "How much is knowing how your gear is actually performing worth to you as a serious or professional photographer?"
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
MarkL
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« Reply #26 on: October 31, 2012, 12:31:09 PM »
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I've never heard anyone say their camera is "unusable" without MFA.
Most DSLRs don't have MFA and people have been happy enough with them.

The ones that don't are either low end or old and therefore having less resolution. Try explaining to a client why every shot wider than f/4 is out of focus.
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stever
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« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2012, 08:39:29 PM »
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thanks Ellis, sounds worthwhile.  a whole lot of images, but given the inacurracies of AF for many (most?) lenses and many cameras (Roger's lensrentals.com AF test is very interesting and consistent with what i have seen but not understood) this is probably a minimal sample to get results more useful than just doing it by eye.

it's still important for the user to decide which aperture should be optimized for lenses with significant focus shift like the Canon 50 1.2 and 1.4 - and then realize that the same focus uncertainty applies with AF in any image (probably only noticeable at larger apertures).

i have a theory that hand held, AI servo and multiple images should be shot with Canon cameras for highest probability of at least one critically sharp image (hoping there will be re-focus from image to image).  haven't yet figured out an efficient test to verify this

of course, if you're using a tripod for still subjects, forget the whole thing and use liveview and CD AF, or even better magnify and focus by eye

Unfortunately, Canon and Nikon have a fair amount of catch-up to do on lens servo tolerances (and probably design) before PD AF matches the capabilities of the latest high resolution cameras
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2012, 09:53:08 PM »
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Imaging-resource.com just reviewed FocusTune and they like it but also outline a different use methodology. See http://www.imaging-resource.com/SOFT/focustune/index.htm for the review and details.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
stever
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« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2012, 10:15:28 PM »
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sounds a bit like a work in progress, but probably worth $19.95 and a reasonable amount of time
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walter.sk
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« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2012, 07:56:35 AM »
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Thanks, Ellis, for the links to info on FocusTune and the summary of Michael Tapes' instructions.  For me, the problem will be deciding the most useful focusing distances, especially for my longer zooms.  I use a Canon 100-400mm, and my shooting at both ends of the zoom vary from 6-10 feet as well as 50 feet to infinity.

I also use a 100mm macro, most often for macro shots, but sometimes as  a mild telephoto.  I suppose setting it for macro would really throw it off for greater distances.
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