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Author Topic: How to shoot improve on image quality shot on a Hasselblad H3DII  (Read 2743 times)
911turbojk
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« on: October 26, 2012, 04:03:57 PM »
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Guys

I am wondering how do we improve on the dynamic range and also noise , and sharpness on the photos taken with H3DII

I saw some photos that was taken by  Dana Neibert one of my favorite commercial photographers and roughly the same setup but his image are soooooo crispy clean and sharp , and free of noise, is it because it was shot via HDR process but why is it that the noise
level is sooooo low.. on his photos ? I am shooting at ISO 100  / 20 sec  f11 exposure on the photo of Downtown L.A

And then with most H3DII photos I still find it way to Noisy ,, any tips ? ( I normally use LR4 for processing my photos)

Thank you guys for sharing the tips in advance.


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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2012, 05:03:33 PM »
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The "exposure blend" option of all the HDR programs I have tried render significantly lower noise in the shadows.
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Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
Architecture and Landscape Photography
WWW.GITTINGSPHOTO.COM

LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2012, 10:45:38 PM »
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Hi,

Noise depends on exposure. So you need long exposure for shadows. That would blow out the highlights. With HDR you make several exposures, one for the highlights and one for the shadows and several between.

Best regards
Erik
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2012, 08:39:50 AM »
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Noise depends on exposure. So you need long exposure for shadows. That would blow out the highlights. With HDR you make several exposures, one for the highlights and one for the shadows and several between.

That's correct, collecting more photons results in lower shot noise. However, in the case of very long exposures the "dark count" characteristics of the sensor also play a role. With exposures longer than approx. 1 second, the dark noise starts increasing  significantly with expose time. The temperature (of the sensor) also plays a big role.

So when the OP talks about 20 seconds for an exposure, his images will suffer. That will require either noise reduction of the image when postprocessing it, or the use of a darkframe subtraction workflow and/or averaging multiple frames. I don't know what technique Dana Neibert uses, his website doesn't support my browser, so if he is not interested in me, then I'm not interested in him either.

Cheers,
Bart
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figure1a
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 12:04:58 AM »
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I think he shoots Phase One backs instead of Hasselblad backs. He's supposed to be giving some insight into how he shoots/works on Wednesday at Siren:

http://www.apa-la.com/Upcoming-APA-LA-Events-Photography-Workshops/an-evening-with-dana-neibert.html
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