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Author Topic: De-curling discussion time!  (Read 1666 times)
darlingm
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« on: October 27, 2012, 09:05:07 PM »
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Saw lots of older discussions on de-curling paper, but didn't see any fantastic solutions, and didn't look like it's been brought up very recently.

I've been decurling by manually reverse rolling on a 3" tube core.  Doesn't always work so well.  I often get "crease" marks that you can see if the light hits it just right.  (Particularly on ~ 300+gsm matte fine art paper.)  I was about to buy a d-roller, but I saw a lot of people saying they also get crease marks, and some saying they aren't durable enough.

Anyone find a fantastic solution?
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Mike • Westland Printworks
Fine Art Printing • Amazing Artwork Reproduction • Photography
http://www.westlandprintworks.com • (734) 255-9761
hugowolf
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« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2012, 10:57:40 PM »
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Saw lots of older discussions on de-curling paper, but didn't see any fantastic solutions, and didn't look like it's been brought up very recently.

I've been decurling by manually reverse rolling on a 3" tube core.  Doesn't always work so well.  I often get "crease" marks that you can see if the light hits it just right.  (Particularly on ~ 300+gsm matte fine art paper.)  I was about to buy a d-roller, but I saw a lot of people saying they also get crease marks, and some saying they aren't durable enough.
I have been using d-rollers specifically to avoid compression creases, and I haven't had a problem so far; except for the price.
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Anyone find a fantastic solution?
Not me.

Brian A
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darlingm
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2012, 03:31:44 AM »
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Perhaps I'll have to give the d-roller a try, but here's some of the threads I saw on it scaring me off today:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=30092.5 - white plastic sheet keeps cracking/getting holes/damaging the prints

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=36260 - often ripples paper visible in the right light.  someone responded saying they get a wave in Ilford GGFS. 
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Mike • Westland Printworks
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http://www.westlandprintworks.com • (734) 255-9761
Damir
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2012, 06:56:25 AM »
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As I post in thread:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=71772.0

I use the way of decurling you describe, but for photo paper - papers with plastic base, sometimes I wind up 30 meters of paper, entire roll, and found that some pictures looks like the paper was band. I can see the line. No particular reason, somewhere in the middle of the roll. This has nothing to do with my working habit, so I suppose that there is some deffect in material during manufacture of paper.

For fine art paper - non plastic - I always decurl pictures one by one on a version of deroller that I made myself. Also sometime I got similiar problem as I describe it above - again it seems to me that this is problem in paper base, as I always do it the same way.
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2012, 10:39:03 AM »
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The d-rollers do work, and I haven't any any problem with creasing (that's what the strips along the side are there to prevent). Having said that I think the d-rollers are not only massively over-priced, but also poorly made. The adhesive they use for attaching the plastic sheet to the roller and the strips to the sheet is just not up to the task.
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Stephen G
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2012, 11:33:15 AM »
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I've built a few de-curlers, from cheap and crappy to the one that I'm using now and I'm quite happy with.

Inspired by http://www.outbackphoto.com/printinginsights/pi013/Epson9600.html but not an exact match.

Approx 5cm wide pipe
Single 250micron Polycarbonate sheet. 3m long
tape the sheet to the pipe and roll it up tight.

In use I unwind quite a bit more than I need for the print at hand. Place the print in the de-curler and then roll it up. Here's the trick to avoiding creases: roll it up loosely. Don't try for a tight roll. Once it's all rolled up you hold the de-curler in the middle and with the other hand you crank the roll tight. Hold for 20 seconds and unroll. Works for me on Epson Enhanced Matte and Hot Press Natural.
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Ken
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« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2012, 01:38:38 PM »
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One of the rubbery strips on my D-Roller plastic apron had a couple of places that were bowed out of straight by about 3/16" at their apexes, exposing the glue by that amount. The glue was on the outside edge so it didn't cause a problem, but I removed it anyway with a blade that I also used to "straighten" the bow.

My problem with the D-Roller was the heavy bar at the core (which is probably the most expensive part of it). Apparently, the glue isn't strong enough to keep the plastic apron attached to it, and glue was exposed where the apron was detaching from the bar. I had to remember to keep my print a couple inches from the core or it would get glued. Much worse of a problem was the undulations on the print that was caused by the weight of that metal core as it flopped around, regardless of how slowly I rolled nor how tightly it was wrapped. I finally replaced the bar with a cardboard core from a roll of all-purpose paper, which still had a few yards of paper on it. The total diameter is about two inches, which is about the same as the metal bar. I glued the end of the remaining all-purpose paper to itself, then glued the end of the plastic apron to that. It's been working perfectly since then and is much easier to handle, with no undulations and no "creases". I suppose a length of heavy-duty plastic plumbing pipe would work fine too. In my experience, weight of the core is a non-issue. For Canson Platine, I roll it moderately tight, let it sit for about 15 seconds, and unroll it.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2012, 01:42:59 PM by Ken » Logged
Pedron
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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2012, 10:50:54 AM »
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À mon avis, la solution ultime est la mienne. Une chambre humide aidé, au besoin, par un humidificateur. J'ai besoin entre 40 et 50 % d'humidité. En 24 h (ou moins), le travail est fait et l'impression est bien à plat. Plus c'est humide, plus c'est rapide. C'est bon même pour les bouts de rouleaux. C'est tout simplement génial pour tous types de papier, mais particulièrement pour le papier beaux-arts qui est souvent bien rond (Magiclée Verona 250 HD dans mon cas).

In my opinion, the ultimate solution is mine. A moist room helped, if necessary, by a humidifier. I need between 40 and 50% humidity. In 24 hours (or less), the work is done and printing is flat. Plus it's wet, it is more rapid. It's good for the ends of rolls. This is just great for all types of paper, but especially for fine art paper that is often well-rounded (Magiclée Verona 250 HD in my case).

Pierre
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