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Author Topic: Question about which camera to buy  (Read 1211 times)
gmoniey
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« on: November 03, 2012, 07:14:46 PM »
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Hi,

Wasn't sure if I should post in this forum, or in the Beginners one, so if this is the wrong forum I apologize in advance. I'm currently searching for a new camera, and would appreciate some friendly advice from those more experienced than me. I currently have a E-P2, and I'm not a fan of it. The lack of viewfinder, flash, and slow autofocus has become rather annoying.

I'm definitely learning when it comes to photography and would easily consider myself a newbie (still trying to get a grasp on exactly how Aperture, ISO, etc affect the shot). So with that in mind, I'm looking for a camera that I can grow with, something that is decent, yet on the lower end of the price range, and has some solid lenses to work with.

I would like to stay in the micro 4/3 arena, as I prefer the small size of the camera, and recently played with my friends GH2 and liked it a lot. I went to a local camera store to play with it some more, and the guy there suggested the Sony NEX-7, and I was impressed with the auto-focus and the EVF.

So know I'm at a crossroads. The GH2 is definitely cheaper (especially with the release of the GH3), and I feel like it has more lenses to choose from, yet, the NEX-7 felt like a solid camera, but I'm unsure of the lens options, and a little bit detracted by the proprietary mount. I really didn't get to play with either enough to say I truly liked one more than the other, however there are some subtle features with the GH2 that I liked more (like the fully swingable LCD screen), although the build quality of the NEX-7 felt significantly better.

Lastly, my primary use will be for stills, but there will definitely be some videos shot here and there.

Any suggestions/advice?

Thanks.
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2012, 08:41:22 PM »
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I just love my GH2.  I've used much more expensive cameras, including the Nikon D3, and find myself using the GH3 A LOT, because it is so easy to carry around (not pocketable, but easy over the shoulder), and gives very good image quality.  I like the larger-than-4/3rds sensor, which optimizes file size for the different formats it offers.  The lenses available include not only the large array of Panasonic and Olympus micro 4/3rds lenses, but also the older ones (and many of them of very high quality), usable with an adapter, designed for the larger 4/3rds cameras.  Those larger 4/3rds lenses are slow to auto-focus, with a good amount of hunting, but ultimately deliver an excellent result.  The EVF isn't up to current state-of-the-art, but is good enough to not need more, in my opinion.  I don't find myself wanting something better, and that is after enjoying nice optical viewfinders in earlier cameras.  This camera just works.  I'm sure the same can be said for the NEX-7, so the answer probably lies in which one feels better to you.  I would suggest handling both if you can before making a decision.  I like the size and grip of the GH2, which is sizeable enough to grip easily.  One thing that pleases me about the GH2 is that the new GH3 doesn't seem to offer anything of significance to the still shooter, so I feel that I'm not missing anything by not upgrading (the GH3 is bigger, heavier, and seems designed for the videographer).  The GH2 hits a sweet spot, with quality and controls that should satisfy for a good while.  --Barbara
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2012, 08:45:11 PM »
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So I just re-read my post, and, not knowing how to edit it, here goes a correction.  The camera I am using a lot is the GH2 -- the one you tried and were asking about.  I am sure that either of these cameras would give you an excellent learning/growing experience in digital and a lot of satisfaction with the results.  Have fun.  --Barbara
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JonathanRimmel
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« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2012, 12:45:59 PM »
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I have not personally used any m4/3 cameras (though I hope to get one at some point.) I have looked into them quite heavily. From what I gather the GH2 is a very popular camera and many photographers enjoy using it. I really am impressed with the Olympus OM-D E-M5. If I were to buy a m4/3 camera today that would likely be it. The nex-7 is a great camera, but since you are on a smaller budget, perhaps you may want to look at the new nex-6. It looks to be rather impressive with a substantially lower price tag.
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AlexanderB
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« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2012, 11:14:18 PM »
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I'm definitely learning when it comes to photography and would easily consider myself a newbie (still trying to get a grasp on exactly how Aperture, ISO, etc affect the shot). So with that in mind, I'm looking for a camera that I can grow with, something that is decent, yet on the lower end of the price range, and has some solid lenses to work with.


My first digital camera was Nikon Coolpix 2100, an awful tech in todays standards (2 Mpix with super tiny sensor), but I still like photos I taken with it. A camera is irrelevant while you still learning the basics. Once you will overgrow your camera you will know exactly what you need.
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rambler44
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2012, 07:17:52 AM »
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JonathanR says, "I really am impressed with the Olympus OM-D E-M5."  I am, too.  I started a few years ago with the 4/3 Olympus e-620.  As a backpacker I went for the size and weight.  I have considered the OM-D E-M5.  The swiveling LCD is helpful especially when  the camera angle is low or at ground level.  The LCD is a touch screen.  Just touch the point in the frame where you want your focus point to be. You can zoom in many small areas of your image to check the focus before you shoot. In Manual Mode the exposure valuation numbers are right on the screen and you can easily see how they change the view.
The same is true with White Balance and the metering modes.  You can see how the effect your image before you shoot.  I have learned a lot about photography using this camera.  Beyond the kit lenses, there are highly rated lenses.  Remember, too, if you with a 4/3 camera 300mm is the equivalent to 600mm on a 35mm standard, but 12mm is equal to 24mm.

The manuals are pocket size, too, which helps when you are learning camera features in the field.  Mine is well worn, but now I do not have to use it often.  I believe the Olympus has two card slots which is a nice feature.  The size of the cards might be limited to 16 GB.  Check it.  I have not used video, but have seen video is easy to edited in CS6.

Generally a higher ISO is used when the light gets darker and a higher ISO is also used if you want faster shutter speeds.  Watch out for "noise" with larger ISO numbers and night shots can be effective using ISO 100 or 200, too.  When I say darker, I mean low light situations such as inside a church or other low lighted building as well as out side in the evening or night.
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