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Author Topic: Juniper  (Read 545 times)
PDobson
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« on: November 05, 2012, 11:43:34 AM »
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This photo was taken yesterday at a nearby crag. This is a place I visit frequently, but rarely bring a camera to. Because I can easily re-visit the scene, I figured that it would be an ideal image to try to perfect. I'd like to explore different ideas for processing and/or shooting this particular image. There looks to be a lot I can do with this tree and the texture of the rock.

Canon 20D, F.Zuiko AUTO-S 50mm 1:1.8 at F4

Phillip Dobson
Butte, Montana
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IanBrowne
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2012, 07:11:19 PM »
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i can see your idea but as posted it's not working  for me. i feel the tree blends with the background rock too much. Some how you need to get a separation of the two and that may be possible by adjust colour channels in the original colour file.

Just a thought to explore: the hard shadows seem to be adding "clutter" to image so maybe  a photo taken when there is less sunshine may help.

there may also be a photo to be taken of the shadows only  Wink

 
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PDobson
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« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2012, 09:26:13 PM »
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We're both seeing the same issue: the tree that should be the focal point is getting lost in the texture of the rock. There isn't much in the way of color separation, but I did hand-adjust the tree in photoshop as much as I consider believable. It obviously wasn't enough.

Your suggestion of waiting for flatter light is a good one. The tree is naturally darker than the rock. If the high-contrast shadows are gone, it might help the tree stand out. If it's sunny, I might experiment with different subject focus. When I took this photo I was belaying my climbing partner, so I wasn't exactly mobile. That has the advantage of forcing you to survey the scene at hand, but it isn't exactly flexible, especially with a prime lens.

Phillip
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quickhiker
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2012, 12:58:04 AM »
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I feel like i can see all of the characters , but the storyline is getting lost. If there was no tree, the backgpind would make an interesting image woth the flow of the rock. The juniper os an interesting subject. Together, they are competing for the image without a clear relationship. Flat light would provide more prominence for the tree, but the tree would still feel a bit spindly and lost against the rock. Id like to see a composition that shows a lot more of the tree. Maybe a view from further to the right to put the juniper against the slab? Shoot from closer to the tree to show more detail? Maybe a series of shots pf different elements that together tell the story? Just throwing out some ideas. Im curious to see where this goes.
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francois
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 01:44:34 AM »
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We're both seeing the same issue: the tree that should be the focal point is getting lost in the texture of the rock. There isn't much in the way of color separation, but I did hand-adjust the tree in photoshop as much as I consider believable.


Texture competes against the tree and in the end nobody has the upper hand. Ian's suggestion might work... if you can reshoot with adequate conditions.
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Francois
PDobson
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2012, 08:27:06 AM »
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I'm excited to get back out there now. I have both a climbing project and a photo project to work on. This is really helping me look at things differently.

It's about to get really cold here in Montana, so I might be trading my rock shoes out for crampons for a while. The next time I get out to Spire, I'll be sure to bring the camera and post the results.

Phillip
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