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Author Topic: Phillips Hue LED light bulbs  (Read 4647 times)
Ellis Vener
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« on: November 13, 2012, 07:53:01 AM »
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Has anyone tried out the new Phillips Hue lightbulbs? While they are insanely expensive, even for LED lightbulbs. but what interests me is that you can very precisely tune their color output, see http://www.meethue.com for details .

My interest in them relates to color managing the ambient light in my digital darkroom  including possibly evaluating  prints in the conditions they will be displayed in.  I have used Solux in the past and have a Graflite viewing booth.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2012, 09:06:18 AM »
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Has anyone tried out the new Phillips Hue lightbulbs? While they are insanely expensive, even for LED lightbulbs. but what interests me is that you can very precisely tune their color output, see http://www.meethue.com for details .

My interest in them relates to color managing the ambient light in my digital darkroom  including possibly evaluating  prints in the conditions they will be displayed in.  I have used Solux in the past and have a Graflite viewing booth.

Hi Ellis,

I assume that the lightbulbs are constructed with RGB LEDs. That means that the spectral output is probably too spiky to produce a reliable spectrum for judging color. I haven't found any analytical data about these particular bulbs yet, so I cannot give a recommendation that's based on actual tests, but I'm sceptical about the usability for the intended purpose. You'd have a better chance with broad spectrum Phosphor converted LED lamps, but their spectral output is also unlike a regular incandescent light.

Cheers,
Bart
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2012, 09:16:59 AM »
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It is a proposed use not an intended use. I have queried Phillips about the suitability of using them this way  but right now I think they are more in the realm of decorative lighting.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
bill t.
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2012, 11:38:00 AM »
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This last weekend I tried 6 of these Sylvania "high CRI" LED spots in an art fair booth.  The colors looked very accurate under the CRI 95 light.  However, the images had a look that I can only describe as "lifeless" in comparison to those that were illuminated with a mix of halogen spots and the ambient fluorescent room light.  This might have something to do with OBA's in the canvas.  If I ever need to do a battery powered show, I will use the LED's for their low power consumption.  But otherwise the halogens are better sales tools.  Life is like that.
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Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 07:04:21 PM »
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Too rich for my blood.

I've tried out high lumens output GE 2800K LED's from Lowe's and wasn't that impressed with them in that they got so darn hot that it defeated the purpose of my using non-tungsten lights. I returned them and found they weren't worth the price.

For 600 Lumens light output at 15 watts viewing inkjet prints with minimal color distortion nothing beats the Philips Natural Sunshine and GE Sunshine 18 inch T8 fluorescent tubes, both rated at 5000K/90CRI, costing between $6-$9 each.

Wonder if the Philips video used the lamps to light the scene, and if so, how much color correcting was required in post. Those skin tones of the girl in white pajamas getting out of bed didn't show the typical greenish yellow patina I've seen from daylight to 2800K LEDs.

I'm not buying bulbs that require a smart phone to change their color appearance.
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Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2012, 07:13:28 PM »
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Oh, I just remembered. FYI, Ellis, concerning those 200 watt output Eiko Colormaster CFLs you asked about here a while back for photography lighting use.

Just like Eiko's clip on task lamp they supply with the Solux bulb where the power supply plug crapped out after 40 hours of use so did their Colormaster.

Eiko doesn't seem to provide adequate quality control on their electronics. What a shame. I really liked Eiko's beefy construction of their task lamp and the light output and color rendering of their Colormaster.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 08:18:54 AM »
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Thanks all, and especially you Tim.  yesterday  I sent my question to Phillips about the Hue and this was their response: The Lightbulbs can operate in 2 modes: colortemperature (CT) from 2000 to 6500k and colormode (xy or hue). In the app it is possible set either a CT or a specific color to the lamp.

SoLux made me really unhappy last year or the year before with their response when all of the AC > DC converters  failed on the multiple small fixtures I own and I am not inclined to send them more money. I had just spent a couple hundred dollars on new bulbs and they went to a friend.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2012, 12:13:59 PM »
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Thanks all, and especially you Tim.  yesterday  I sent my question to Phillips about the Hue and this was their response: The Lightbulbs can operate in 2 modes: colortemperature (CT) from 2000 to 6500k and colormode (xy or hue). In the app it is possible set either a CT or a specific color to the lamp.

SoLux made me really unhappy last year or the year before with their response when all of the AC > DC converters  failed on the multiple small fixtures I own and I am not inclined to send them more money. I had just spent a couple hundred dollars on new bulbs and they went to a friend.


Very interesting to hear that about your Solux lamps, Ellis. Big coincidence you and I having trouble with the electronics driving the same bulb brand. I would think it would be rare this happening.

It's hard to believe the daylight bulb technology has now far surpassed the electronic's capabilities to drive them. It's not rocket science to build a reliable AC>DC converter. Tesla and Thomas Edison fought it out and made it happen reliably over 90 years ago.

I can't figure how Sylvania and others can develop the DC electronics for car headlights that seem to keep working for years under the most grueling conditions but the electronics for indoor daylight bulbs can't seem to keep up.

Solux and Eiko ought to look into using car headlight electronics. Or maybe rechargeable batterie technology.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2012, 11:57:39 AM »
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Very interesting to hear that about your Solux lamps, Ellis. Big coincidence you and I having trouble with the electronics driving the same bulb brand. I would think it would be rare this happening.

It's hard to believe the daylight bulb technology has now far surpassed the electronic's capabilities to drive them. It's not rocket science to build a reliable AC>DC converter. Tesla and Thomas Edison fought it out and made it happen reliably over 90 years ago.

I can't figure how Sylvania and others can develop the DC electronics for car headlights that seem to keep working for years under the most grueling conditions but the electronics for indoor daylight bulbs can't seem to keep up.

Solux and Eiko ought to look into using car headlight electronics. Or maybe rechargeable batterie technology.

I went to a  local electronics shop to see about getting new converters made. They took one look at the one SoLux sold with those task lamps and laughed.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
Jack Varney
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2012, 09:01:25 PM »
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There seems to be a serious misunderstanding about Solux "electronics" and "converters". I have used their Gooseneck Clamp-On for some five years now with zero issues.

The reality is that there are no complex "electronics" or "converters" employed! The lamps are powered by a simple 120 vAC to 12 vAC transformer. No AC to DC conversion required, just simple stuff. For powering additional lamps I use an outdoor lighting transformer to power multiples. Any decent 120 to 12 vAC transformer of sufficient wattage (bulb dependent) will do.

Home Depot sells a track fixture light with individual transformers to plug into the track for each light bulb. It is reasonably priced and works well according to a local photographer. The brand name is Glomar.

Disclaimer: I have no business or personal connection with either Solux, Glomar or Home Depot.
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Jack Varney
Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2012, 09:52:50 PM »
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There seems to be a serious misunderstanding about Solux "electronics" and "converters". I have used their Gooseneck Clamp-On for some five years now with zero issues.

The reality is that there are no complex "electronics" or "converters" employed! The lamps are powered by a simple 120 vAC to 12 vAC transformer. No AC to DC conversion required, just simple stuff. For powering additional lamps I use an outdoor lighting transformer to power multiples. Any decent 120 to 12 vAC transformer of sufficient wattage (bulb dependent) will do.

Home Depot sells a track fixture light with individual transformers to plug into the track for each light bulb. It is reasonably priced and works well according to a local photographer. The brand name is Glomar.

Disclaimer: I have no business or personal connection with either Solux, Glomar or Home Depot.

No one suggested the electronics to drive the Solux bulb is complex. Of low quality in materials and manufacturing? It appears to be. Wall plug transformers aren't the most reliable as they used to be which is what went out on my Eiko/Solux task lamp.

It could be that both of us hail from Texas or at least Ellis spent some time here. Maybe southern U.S. electrical grids require beefier hardware. I just don't understand why I'm having so much trouble with Eiko electronics evidenced by both my Solux task lamp transformer going out and Eiko's CFL crapping out which was rated to operate for 10,000 hours. I didn't even get 50 hours out of it.

Just a fluke? I don't think so.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2012, 09:55:14 PM by tlooknbill » Logged
Jack Varney
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« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2012, 06:09:01 PM »
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Well, I am in Florida about three blocks from the Atlantic. If the southern grid or the weather affects these I haven't experienced it.
Average voltage here is between 121 and 122 VAC.
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Jack Varney
MarkM
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« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2012, 10:32:19 PM »
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To get back to the Hue lights—I have been very tempted, but the price has made me hesitant to jump in. It seems like they might be a nice solution for a work environment. Not necessarily one where you need to judge color in prints, but where you do post processing and would like to control the ambient brightness and cct. For my particular space this would involve installing eight bulbs, which is enough of an investment that it makes it easy to put off.

Has anyone here actually tried them yet?
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