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Author Topic: Erase an SSD for reuse  (Read 7287 times)
Craig Lamson
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« on: November 17, 2012, 08:01:01 AM »
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I have a  VERTEX2 ssd drive that I want to install in a Mac Book Pro.

This drive currently has a complete windows 7 install on it.

What is the best way to erase  this drive, wiping it clean so it can host another OS?
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kingscurate
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2012, 11:44:39 AM »
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For mac i cant help. Although this link may help. Its off windows 7 forum.

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/1649-clean-install-windows-7-a.html

It may point you in the right direction
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RobSaecker
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2012, 02:37:19 PM »
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Reformat it to HFS, install OS X.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2012, 05:09:06 PM »
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Can you hook it back up to a PC, perhaps via USB? Then do a full format (not a quick format) on the disk. Mac probably has some similar command.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2012, 06:59:54 PM »
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Thanks for the tips  everyone , I'm still not sure where to head with this. It appears from my research that it needs to be restored. Still checking that out.

Different that a rotating drive, again from my current research.
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PierreVandevenne
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2012, 07:41:00 PM »
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There's really nothing special about it. OS X can have several bootable drives connected  at the same time, you just pick and choose at boot time. This is especially useful for developers whon need to check compatibility with several OS versions.

The only thing that can be a bit tricky in the install is that OS X might just refuse to recognize the drive if it has an unusual format (for example it was part of a set in a RAID array). Other than that, SSD or HDD, it is really easy.

Very quick method: install the drive in the Mac Book Pro. Boot from the install DVD (if you have no DVD, see below).  If the disk is recognized, proceed with the installation. Depending on the partitioning scheme of the disk, there can be small variations, but they are easy to understand and follow. If there is any hiccup at this point, go to the disk utilities menu from the boot DVD and simply remove all partitions (or only one if there are more and you want to keep data on one of the previous partitions, obviously) and proceed.

Slower method: hook the drive through any kind of adapter (USB/Firewire/dock etc...). Use the disk utilities from the currently running OS X to remove all partitions from the drive. Start the install from DVD, or eventually downloaded and kept DMG if latest versions obtained from the app store. Select the new drive as a target for installation. Then let everything proceed. Select the boot drive at will when restarting (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1310). One you have confrimed everythings work, swap drives.

Note that OS X will usually start to index the content of the new drive. Doesn't matter much, but is just a waste of resource.

Migrating to SSD can also be done that way

Make sure your data will fit the SSD with some margin. For example, starting from a 500GB HDD based MacBook going to a 250 GB SSD, make sure you have at most 200-220 GB used on the original drive. Make sure your Time Machine backup is up to date, Remove old HDD, install SSD, boot from DVD (or network, or even old drive then on USB, USB key... Select the option to restore from a backup and proceed.

It's really an area where OS X beats Windows in terms of convenience.

You can also clone disks from diskutil and then do the swap. In some cases you'll run into problems when the number of file descriptors is too high, but it is unusual. You might also have more complex cloning scenarios when using different versions for OS X for the boot drive and the drives you are cloning, but that probably doesn't apply in your case. If it does, stick to the same version for the boot and drive to be cloned, then upgrade the cloned drive as needed.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2012, 07:42:43 PM by PierreVandevenne » Logged
kingscurate
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2012, 06:05:45 AM »
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The previous post notes about cloning the ssd disk. Windows 7 you do a clean install, never clone and you are suppose to secure clean the disk first. With macs i dont know.
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PierreVandevenne
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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2012, 06:56:20 AM »
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Windows 7 is perfectly clonable. Dozens of third party utilities will do that. It is also officially supported by Microsoft. Even on a large scale...

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en/w7itproinstall/thread/10d9debc-77a5-4ad9-8554-aad8429f8a02

The only use of "secure cleaning" is if you want to avoid leaving recoverable data on the drive.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2012, 07:52:00 AM »
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I understand I can clone windows, I'm just not looking to clone windows.
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John.Murray
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2012, 10:38:41 AM »
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Craig: 
Assuming your at firmware 1.7 or above, a secure erase will do the trick - you can download the utility from OCZ
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kingscurate
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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2012, 11:54:55 AM »
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Previous to earlier post about cloning win 7, from experience i cloned win 7 to a SSD. It caused me problems. I then did a clean install after some research, no problems. I did mean to put this explanation previously, but i hit the reply button.
I accept your not cloning win 7, i would look on mac forums to see what users recommend. I went on a win 7 forum and found the recommended way of doing things.
Crucial who supplied my SSD provide a you tube video of installing a SSD, how to clone a SSD, they made it look easy, but they didnt highlight drivers/bios settings pitfalls.
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RobSaecker
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« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2012, 12:42:34 PM »
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Previous to earlier post about cloning win 7, from experience i cloned win 7 to a SSD...

*Edited for tone, with apologies to anyone who I might have offended. I was having a bad day when I originally posted, I'd have been better off not posting at all that day.

WRT secure erase, the only reason to do that is if you intend to dispose of the drive, and want to be sure none of your data is available to any future owner of the drive. It's unnecessary if the intention is to reuse the drive. You have to reformat the drive to install OS X on it, it will not install on a drive formatted for Windows, and reformatting effectively erases the drive. None of the data on the drive will be accessible once it's reformatted, without resorting to specialized data recovery software.

Craig, Pierre's post contains everything you need to know in order to do this, though it might have been stated a little more succinctly. If you need step by step instructions, I'd be happy to help, just send me a message through LL.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2012, 11:48:53 AM by RobSaecker » Logged

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chrismurphy
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« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2012, 08:19:51 PM »
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I have a  VERTEX2 ssd drive that I want to install in a Mac Book Pro.
This drive currently has a complete windows 7 install on it.
What is the best way to erase  this drive, wiping it clean so it can host another OS?

OS X Disk Utility. Click on the drive icon with make/model number, click on the Partitions tab, choose 1 partition, click on options and make sure it's set to GUID Partition Table, and then click erase. Done.

I have asked for ATA Secure Erase (and Enhanced Secure Erase if the drive supports it) in Disk Utility for years, but still see this antiquated writing of multiple passes to the disk which should not be used for an ssd. ATA Secure Erase will take a few seconds (maybe up to a minute or two at most, depending on the firmware implementation) to erase the whole drive, including deallocated sectors which there will be quite a few of with over provisioned ssds.
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