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Author Topic: The Digital Print  (Read 35954 times)
Schewe
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« on: November 20, 2012, 12:26:48 AM »
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Folks...

working on the TOC for the next book in the series; The Digital Print...

This is preliminary and subject to change, but I thought it would be useful to get the feedback of interested parties (meaning you all on LuLa).

The relative page count is subject to change as I write and note that I can't cover EVEREYTHING everybody thinks may be important. I've got a limited page count ya know...sorry for the potential formatting issues...LuLa doesn't seem to like tabbed text layouts :-(

So,...to quote Pat Benatar, Hit me with your best shot...

:~)


The Digital Print
Preparing Images in Lightroom and Photoshop For Printing
By Jeff Schewe
Preliminary Table Of Contents
Based on 288 editorial pages

Front Matter: Including TOC (12 pages)
Intro: (3 pages)

Chapter 1: A Digital Printer Primer (22 pages)
                       A brief history of digital printing
                       Types of digital printers
                                    Inkjet
                                         Thermal vs Piezoelectric print heads
                                         Pigment vs Dye inks
                                    Dye sublimation
                                    Chromogenic
                                    Halftone
                        Picking a printer
                                    Consumer grade
                                    Professional grade
                                    Printing in-house vs a service bureau or
                                    photo lab
 
Chapter 2: Color Management (52 pages)
                        The basics of color management
                                    What is a color profile?
                                    What is a Working Space?
                                    What is a Rendering Intent?
                                    What is a color management module (CMM)
                        Color management for displays
                                    Calibration
                                    Characterization
                                    Profile generation
                        Color management for printers
                                    Calibration
                                    Characterization
                                    Profile generation
                        Color management in Photoshop
                        Color management in Lightroom
 
Chapter 3: Preparing Images for Printing (70 pages)
                        Soft Proofing
                                    Soft Proofing vs Gamut Warning
                                    Soft Proofing in Photoshop
                                    Soft Proofing in Lightroom
                        Tone and color optimization
                                    In Photoshop
                                    In Lightroom
                        Image sharpening and noise reduction
                                    A sharpening workflow
                                                Capture sharpening
                                                Creative sharpening
                                                Output sharpening
                        Image and output resolution
                                    How much is enough resolution
                                    Image vs printer resolution
                                    Image interpolation
                                                Upsampling
                                                Downsampling
                        Preparing an image for B&W printing
                        Preparing an image for 3rd party printing by a service bureau or photo lab
                        Preparing images for halftone reproduction
                        Preparing images for media devices
 
Chapter 4: Making the Print (60 pages)
                Printing from Photoshop
                            The Print dialog window
                                    Setting up for printing on Mac
                                    Setting up for printing on Windows
                            Printing from a printer plug-in
                Printing from Lightroom
                                The Print module (right panel)
                                        Layout Style
                                        Single Image/Contact Sheet
                                        Picture Package
                                        Custom Package
                                        Image Settings
                                        Layout
                                        Guides
                                        Page
                                        Print Job
                                The Print module (left panel)
                                        Preview
                                        Template Browser
                                        Collections
                                                Unsaved Print
                                                Create Saved Print
                    Print Settings on Mac
                    Print Settings on Windows
                    Printing a B&W image
 
Chapter 5: Attributes of a Perfect Print (48 pages)
                    What is a “Perfect Print”?
                                    Print viewing environment
                                                How to judge the tone and
                                                color of a print
                                                How to judge the detail of a
                                                print
                                    Digital print artifacts
                                                Gloss differential
                                                Metameric failure
                                                Bronzing
                                                Pixilation (lack of
                                                resolution)
                        Print substrates (paper/media)
                                    Photo Papers
                                                Glossy paper
                                                Matte paper
                                    Canvas
                                    Alternative substrates
                                    Picking the right paper for the image
                                    Determining the contrast range of a print
                        Print finishing
                                    Coatings
                                    Matting
                                    Framing
                        Print presentation
                                    Portfolios and bindings
                                    Folios
                        Lighting and displaying the framed print
                        Print storage
                        Print longevity
                                    Impact of OBA's
                                    Acid Free vs. buffered PH neutrality
                                    Environmental factors

Chapter 6: Developing a Printing Workflow (30 pages)
                        When to print in Photoshop vs Lightroom
                                    Photoshop print workflow
                                    Lightroom print workflow
                                    Combining Lightroom and Photoshop print
                                    workflows
                          Jeff’s print workflow
                          Using 3rd party RIPs
                   
Back Matter (Index 15 pages)
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Onslow
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2012, 01:48:03 AM »
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I've seen a few things I wanted but then on re-reading it, you have them covered. May I ask the anticipated publication date?

I look forward to purchasing this...
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Onslow
Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2012, 02:39:15 AM »
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                        Color management in Photoshop
                        Color management in Lightroom

                                    Soft Proofing in Photoshop
                                    Soft Proofing in Lightroom
                        Tone and color optimization
                                    In Photoshop
                                    In Lightroom
     
                Printing from Lightroom
                                The Print module (right panel)
                        Print longevity
                                    Impact of OBA's
                                    Acid Free vs. buffered PH neutrality
                                    Environmental factors

Chapter 6: Developing a Printing Workflow (30 pages)
                        When to print in Photoshop vs Lightroom
                                    Photoshop print workflow
                                    Lightroom print workflow
                                    Combining Lightroom and Photoshop print
                                    workflows

                          Using 3rd party RIPs
                   

Although it is not a RIP, is Qimage Ultimate covered in that last chapter or could you add it anywhere where Lightroom gets its explanations? The new DFS, Deep Focus Sharpening, is an interesting option in that program too.

On print longevity are there references to Aardenburg-Imaging, etc so people know where to look for paper properties and fade test results? Mark has some excellent articles on his website.


--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
470+ inkjet paper white spectral plots, November 2012:
rearranged categories, Sihl Masterclass papers following soon




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Tony Jay
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2012, 02:50:24 AM »
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Looks pretty comprehansive to me.
Already drooling in anticipation - disgustingly Pavlovian of me I know - but I can't help it.

Tony Jay
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Adam L
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2012, 06:38:28 AM »
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Will there be a chapter on the Epson advanced B&W process?  That would be helpful to me.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2012, 07:51:00 AM »
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The topic list looks great. The additional suggestions made so far seem worthy, too.
Don't rush it, as I'm just into Chapter 3 of the Digital Negative, which is the first photo technical book I've seen in years that is in the same quality league as Ansel's Basic Photo Series. Saint Ansel would approve.
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bjanes
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2012, 08:17:37 AM »
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Jeff,

The outline appears excellent and I am looking forward to the finished product. The separation of topics in the negative and print stage was much clearer in Adams' day. He could achieve global optimization through exposure and development, but local corrections had to be made at the print stage. With digital, local adjustments can be made in Photoshop and to some degree in Lightroom, and some of these topics are covered in the Digital Negative book. However, much of the art of the print is in rendering tone and color into the relatively narrow gamut of the print as discussed by Karl Lang in his Adobe white paper.

I presume that this topic will be covered in Chapter 3 under tone and color, and I would like to see an expanded discussion of these topics along the lines of Karl's white paper. I know that you don't like HDR, but feel that this topic should be addressed.

Regards,

Bill
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Damir
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2012, 05:24:51 PM »
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It is difficult to say just from TOC how will address some topics but what I miss from all books about printing and color management is deeper insight in some facts like what is .oms file, what information you need beside icc profile for optimal print, what is linearization and how to perform it, how to detect ink limit, how to set up printer for various paper thickness, how to test all that and how to change it and optimize if you find that result is not as good as it can be.

There are lots of topic in this forum that are here because no one ever write about them in a book, like difference in measurement and real life perception in gloss and matt paper maximum black or DMax, general difference in gloss and matte surface and paper characteristic like ink comsuption, scratch resistance, media handling.

Than de-rolling of print and storing finished prints. Especially how to handle big prints.

I know that it may be too much for a single book, but most of the books so far are how to navigate through the menus, which is not enough.

Best wishes with a book.
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KeithR
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2012, 05:28:50 PM »
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Will there be a chapter on the Epson advanced B&W process?  That would be helpful to me.
At the bottom of chapter 4 is listed "Printing a B&W image". I'm sure that Mr. Schewe will include the ABW workflow at this time.
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2012, 07:51:12 PM »
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Wow, a 15 page index, that is old school, and just great.

I would like to see a description of how each of the rendering intents work, particularly perceptual and relative colrimetric and especially covering the differences when there are no colors out of gamut compared to when there are out of gamut areas, I really don't think it is covered well anywhere.

Brian A
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Schewe
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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2012, 08:13:02 PM »
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Although it is not a RIP, is Qimage Ultimate covered in that last chapter or could you add it anywhere where Lightroom gets its explanations? The new DFS, Deep Focus Sharpening, is an interesting option in that program too.

On print longevity are there references to Aardenburg-Imaging, etc so people know where to look for paper properties and fade test results? Mark has some excellent articles on his website.

Yes to both questions...but Qimage will only get slight coverage because, well, I don't do Windows :~) I plan on getting a copy and running it in Parallels to talk about the options. With regards to longevity discussion, I'll point to both Aardenburg-Imaging as well as Wilhelm Imaging Research...I may point out some of the differences in the ratings but I doubt I'll get too deep into the nitty-gritty details...
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Schewe
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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2012, 08:13:28 PM »
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May I ask the anticipated publication date?


Due April 2013...
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Schewe
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2012, 08:15:25 PM »
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Will there be a chapter on the Epson advanced B&W process?

Not a chapter, but definitely a section. I'll also cover a bit about the QuadToneRIP and B&W. I won't be covering (but will mention) Piezography.
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Schewe
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2012, 08:21:35 PM »
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I presume that this topic will be covered in Chapter 3 under tone and color, and I would like to see an expanded discussion of these topics along the lines of Karl's white paper. I know that you don't like HDR, but feel that this topic should be addressed.

Karl actually wrote that paper for me under contract to Adobe (and I had to help edit a tiny bit and keep pushing him to get it done :~) so I'm familiar with the topics...It's not that I don't like HDR, I do, what I don't like are HDR overdone as an effect...but dealing with high dynamic range from scene to print is a fact of life. I've been dealing with it since school at RIT where I did D log H curves and charted the scene contrast range>the negative density range>print density range...
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« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2012, 08:23:17 PM »
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I would like to see a description of how each of the rendering intents work, particularly perceptual and relative colrimetric and especially covering the differences when there are no colors out of gamut compared to when there are out of gamut areas, I really don't think it is covered well anywhere.

Thanks...planning on covering that!
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« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2012, 08:28:56 PM »
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After reading through the TOC and suggestions I can't think of anything to add... but definitely looking forward to it!

Mike.
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Schewe
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« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2012, 08:29:37 PM »
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It is difficult to say just from TOC how will address some topics but what I miss from all books about printing and color management is deeper insight in some facts like what is .oms file, what information you need beside icc profile for optimal print, what is linearization and how to perform it, how to detect ink limit, how to set up printer for various paper thickness, how to test all that and how to change it and optimize if you find that result is not as good as it can be.

Just to let you know in advance, I'm not planning a drill down on using specific printers. I can't, there are simply too many of them. The .oms file is really an HP thing only, and sad to say, HP is really no longer a major player in the current state of the art fine-art printers. I will show both Epson and Canon, pro & consumer, but aside from best practices in dealing with your printer in general, the printers' manuals will need to suffice for the specifics of individual printer models.

Quote
There are lots of topic in this forum that are here because no one ever write about them in a book, like difference in measurement and real life perception in gloss and matt paper maximum black or DMax, general difference in gloss and matte surface and paper characteristic like ink comsuption, scratch resistance, media handling.

That I'll be covering...
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Schewe
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« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2012, 08:32:52 PM »
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http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
470+ inkjet paper white spectral plots, November 2012:
rearranged categories, Sihl Masterclass papers following soon

I'll also mention this as a resource :~)
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« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2012, 09:03:43 PM »
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+1 on Qimage.  It's superior in many ways and doesn't have amnesia.  

One of the most important and overlooked tools for selecting papers is Quadtone RIP's calibration page.  Many people are under the mistaken assumption that there is no scientific and accurate way to determine how papers respond to ink (or pigment), but QTR gives you that tool.  No profile or adjustment is involved.  You select only the type of black ink (glossy or matte), and the dpi for the printer (like Epson's 1440x720 or 2880x1440). That's it.  The calibration page simply pushes ink from each cartridge in 5% increments, from 5% to 100%.  Then, you have a direct comparative method for determining ink response from either matte or glossy paper types.  It also makes the color ramps the same way.  You could also compare each of the color cartridge responses, but the blacks tell you all you really need to know in order to select great papers based on their basic inking response instead of rumor, recommendations, reviews, advertisements, and purely subjective judgement.  This tool easily weeds out many of the low-quality papers.  

The different responses can also be compared visually, even without a spectrometer or colorimiter.  When a paper reverses in the top black, there it is for you to see and your spectro will verify that you're not blind.  It's really doing that.  You'll see bronzing at it's best, or worst, and you'll have an idea, unless you have UV cut, when the manufacturer is lying to you about their special bleaching method or substrate that doesn't use any OBA's.  You'll see which papers would give you bumpy curves that would be very hard to linearize.  Then, a visit to Aardenberg and Wilhelm, and Ernst Dinkla's SpectrumViz, and you'll have made your selection task a lot easier.  You'll see when the color gamut is lacking and whent it's good.  Then, you can print to test sharpness, and make subjective surface comparisons (but some of that is taken care of when you compare bronzing on the QTR printouts) without a lot of effort and expense.  There's a technical section that talks about this on my website www.dygartphotography.com.  First, there's a discussion, and second an example of the print-out, followed by charts with some good information, such as the black-to-white difference for each paper-ink combination.

Looking forward to your book,  Happy Thanksgiving, and Aloha (Like your shirt).  

Aaron
 
« Last Edit: November 20, 2012, 09:06:53 PM by AaronPhotog » Logged

Aaron Dygart,
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Rand47
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« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2012, 10:32:00 PM »
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Looks pretty comprehansive to me.
Already drooling in anticipation - disgustingly Pavlovian of me I know - but I can't help it.

Tony Jay

Literally took the words right out of my mouth. +1!
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