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Author Topic: Keystone correction for LR?  (Read 1831 times)
dreed
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« on: November 26, 2012, 02:49:14 AM »
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I was playing with DxO Labs v8 on the weekend and I'm absolutely stunned at how well the rectangle defined keystone correction works. Is anything similar planned for LR?
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stamper
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2012, 03:45:21 AM »
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Doubtful? It would make PS less attractive with respect to sales.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2012, 07:04:25 AM »
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LR does have some basic distortion correction in the Lens Correction module under the Manual tab.
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AFairley
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2012, 09:17:43 AM »
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Doubtful? It would make PS less attractive with respect to sales.

Except that PS does not have the feature the OP is describing either.  I wish LR/PS did have something like that, it would make the adjustments a lot easier. 
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Jim-St
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2012, 10:20:06 AM »
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The DxO View Point plugin is available for LR, and does the trick the OP describes, as well as cleaning up anamorphic distortions that WA lenses can often create near the sides of a shot. But it does it as an external edit, and returns a tiff, so not quite what I'd like to see LR do. One for the Adobe Feature Requests for sure, though, I'd say

Jim
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2012, 11:21:38 AM »
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Except that PS does not have the feature the OP is describing either.  I wish LR/PS did have something like that, it would make the adjustments a lot easier. 

Perhaps not exactly the same but PS does have pretty powerful transformation tools.  The only thing the DxO application does that isn't readily available in PS is the correction of distortion at the edge of the frame.  DxO shows it being used for faces.  And even then, the PS Warp tool would probably take care of a lot of that.
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AFairley
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2012, 01:10:35 PM »
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I used Andromeda LensDoc back when as a PS plugin. To correct keystoning all you had to do was place dots at either end of the "lines" that were supposed to be vertical, and click, and done.  A lot easier that the iterative process in LR/CS of adusting keystone, tweak rotation, and repeat.  There are other plugins that do this in PS also, but I prefer to do it in the raw development stage at the same time as optical corrections.
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2012, 03:39:33 PM »
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I don't use the feature in Lightroom often (I use a TSE when required), but I've used it a few times (last night) and it worked well.

Glenn
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dreed
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2012, 07:14:11 PM »
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I used Andromeda LensDoc back when as a PS plugin. To correct keystoning all you had to do was place dots at either end of the "lines" that were supposed to be vertical, and click, and done.

DxO now allows this to be done by placing the four corners of a trapezoid, not just two horizontal/vertical lines, on the image. It is damn near perfect. The only way it could be better is if it allowed you to select the edge of a something using contrast rather than drawing new lines. You can even move the corners around whilst zoomed in at 100% rather than being forced to make all of the perspective adjustments in "fit to view".

The DxO View Point plugin is available for LR, and does the trick the OP describes, as well as cleaning up anamorphic distortions that WA lenses can often create near the sides of a shot.

I haven't tried the ViewPoint plugin yet.
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stamper
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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2012, 03:15:15 AM »
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Except that PS does not have the feature the OP is describing either.  I wish LR/PS did have something like that, it would make the adjustments a lot easier. 

A couple of links.

http://takeoutphoto.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/fix-perspective-aka-keystoning-in.html

http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1670666

I am sure there are a lot more links I could have found?

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dreed
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2012, 05:36:03 AM »
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Yup, I've used this in the past. It is slow and painful to manually adjust the horizontal and vertical sliders to "correct" the picture.

key1 is the original
key2 is LR (distortion -6, vertical -60, horizontal +61, rotate -1.9)
key3 is DxO
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stamper
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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2012, 06:31:17 AM »
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I am wondering about your statement as to how well DXO does the job. I haven't used it and I don't intended to. It will give you an "accurate" adjustment but somebody might not want that so adjusting to taste might be better for some?
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Brad Smith
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« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2012, 07:04:15 AM »
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It appears from dreed's example that DxO preserved more of the tree on the right side of the image. Is this perhaps another benefit, especially when one has forgotten to leave sufficient room for such corrections in the original capture?
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GeraldB
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« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2012, 08:22:27 AM »
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I have a copy of DXO specifically for the perspective correction feature. It works very well. I find it always preserves more than I can achieve in LRM. It does allow the user to adjust to taste, e.g. you may want to keep a little vertical convergence to make it look more "real". This is done by moving the corners of the rectangle and observing the simultaneous result in the split screen mode.
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