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Author Topic: Time coding and DSLR Video for Interviews  (Read 3051 times)
Brian Hirschfeld
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« on: December 01, 2012, 12:31:27 PM »
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basically when I am shooting interviews (or any video for that matter) it is for my website (http://www.brianhirschfeldphotography) and my youtube channel (BHPhotoWeekly) and I am generally shooting my Nikon D4 and Nikon D3s for these shoots. Generally I have had one mic on one camera and had that be all the audio and then try and have Final Cut Pro X sync them but this doesn't seem to be the best system. I am considering upgrading to some lavalier mic's and a new shotgun mic but don't know how I can get all of this audio to sync up in Final Cut Pro X.

I read this article about a device that does time coding (http://www.freshdv.com/2011/01) I don't know how effective this is or if there is a better quality device that does this. Any help would be appreciated. Also Microphone recommendations are welcome.  
« Last Edit: December 01, 2012, 12:37:36 PM by Brian Hirchfeld » Logged

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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2012, 10:42:03 AM »
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I think you are not being ignored, posters here will only add when they know. We dont know.

You could contact dan at DSLRnewsshooter http://www.dslrnewsshooter.com/2011/01/25/lockit-buddy-offers-innovative-timecode-solution-for-dslr-video/

S

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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2012, 10:43:58 AM »
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Fair enough, I will do that thank you. I don't really care if it is technically "time-coding" in the cinema sense, but I'm trying to find a more accurate way of knowing I have sync'ed audio.. thanks
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AFairley
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« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2012, 10:46:41 AM »
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If your videos are generally only a couple of takes, syncing to a clapper is pretty fast and easy.  I always did a before and after clap to take care of audio time drift.  Not sure if your volume justifies springing for time code level gear (or for that matter if time codes would help you sync to the camera in the first place).
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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2012, 10:47:48 AM »
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The issue that I am more concerned about is sync-ing the videos and then being able to cut them together with the audio remaining sync-ed...

Would it be better for me to use Adobe Premiere CS6? I have it as part of the master collection or whatever
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« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2012, 11:28:59 AM »
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It shouldn't be necessary to go to the bother and expense of buying extra hardware. Once you have manually synched a particular clip, if it is not edited into your sequence correctly it can go out of sync. What you need to do is make what Avid and FCP 7 call a "subclip", this is effectively an "alias", it accesses the same media but the picture and audio are locked together, so they can't go out of sync. I don't use FCPX but it seems it's possible to create subclips, they are called Favourites. Google it. On the other hand, if you have Premiere, I would suggest you learn and use it.
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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2012, 11:33:32 AM »
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On one level, for my video is a bit of an inconvenience, since I am heavily invested (both financially and mentally) but I recognize that it has great potential for reviews etc, which is why I bother with it.

Final Cut Pro X seems to offer a lot of the features that I want, but it doesn't seem to be terribly intuitive. Considering the amount I know about Photoshop, you think Premiere would be an easy learn?
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« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2012, 11:42:01 AM »
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I don't use Premiere either, I use Avid, but from what I can see Premiere has come a long way from the early days and it is used by many people. You will have to learn how to organise media within the programme, sync up material, and learn how to insert edit and overwrite edit and trim in the timeline, - none of these processes has an equal in other Adobe applications. Where similarities do seem to exist are in the way visual effects are dealt with in Premiere, and for your kind of productions this may be irrelevant. Since you have Premiere, give it a try, import some of your footage and experiment, you may be pleasantly surprised.
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« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2012, 12:51:05 PM »
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I assume you are using one of the DSLRs to record audio. In that case audio is in sync with that same video track, at least is should remain locked unless you deliberately unlock it (FCP). B-roll without usable audio can be synched by finding identical spots in video (hand clap, any easy to notice movement) or by listening summed audio tracks for echo.

If we have two long video clips (easiest to do by letting cameras run without stopping) I put the clips on two tracks with the A-roll on top. After aligning the clips I just cut out sections of A-roll where I want the B-roll show through. This way just one alignment is enough for each long clip pair.

Good but fairly cheap shotgun would be one of the Rode models, they also have decent lavalieres. A small mixer like Sound Devices 302 would be very useful, and makes it possible to use any microphone, also those needing phantom power. For indoor interviews a hypercardioid is a better choice than a normal shotgun. Oktava MK012 with hyper capsule is the low cost standard with good quality.
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2012, 03:23:16 PM »
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Of course I come back to having got out of DSLR for main cam and using and FS100 (or now C100?)

The b cam - you may choose not to show lips, which will mean a rough synch will work and  actually may give you more edit options..

S
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Richard Pickett
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« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2012, 06:43:42 AM »
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You might like to investigate PluralEyes, software which seems purpose built for the sort of problem you describe. Their website is at www.singularsoftware.com/pluraleyes.html and while I believe this is currently available only for Mac they will shortly be releasing a Windows version as well, to play along with Premiere, Avid etc as well as the already supported FCP.
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Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2012, 10:43:45 AM »
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basically when I am shooting interviews (or any video for that matter) it is for my website (http://www.brianhirschfeldphotography) and my youtube channel (BHPhotoWeekly) and I am generally shooting my Nikon D4 and Nikon D3s for these shoots. Generally I have had one mic on one camera and had that be all the audio and then try and have Final Cut Pro X sync them but this doesn't seem to be the best system. I am considering upgrading to some lavalier mic's and a new shotgun mic but don't know how I can get all of this audio to sync up in Final Cut Pro X.

I read this article about a device that does time coding (http://www.freshdv.com/2011/01) I don't know how effective this is or if there is a better quality device that does this. Any help would be appreciated. Also Microphone recommendations are welcome.  

I have a chapter in the rigging guide that goes into the basics. In short, you can use a Pix240i with Ambient. It is overkill for DSLR setups. Philip Bloom shoots a lot with the 1DX, his workflow is simple.
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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2012, 10:17:42 AM »
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Could possibly link me to this? thank you.
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Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2012, 10:02:00 PM »
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Guide link: http://wolfcrow.com/blog/comprehensive-guide-to-rigging-any-camera-12-making-the-connections-part-4/

Philip Bloom 1DX: http://philipbloom.net/2012/08/14/1dx-2/
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allenface
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« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2013, 08:38:27 PM »
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Referring to the issue of TC for DSLR's...that is an issue that can probably only be solved with an off board recorder.  I have been successful in using Convergent Designs Nano Flash with my Nikon D800.  It allows me to  set real time time code and just let it run.  I've also just purchased  Ninja2, mainly for monitoring.  One of the the things I miss with the D800 is being able to do low angle and wonky angles. Without a tilting finder it's pretty tough.  I reasoned that if I got a small on board monitor that would solve my problem.  I also reasoned that most small monitors of any quality are going to run between $600-$900US.  The Ninja2 falls in that range.  Decent enough monitor with nice features and I get a kicking recorder to boot.  Very pleased with the Ninja, although I gotta say I can't use it on a show I do for DIY Network, USA.  I shoot a room make over show called Mega Dens using an f800, and EX-3 and several GoPro's.  I drop the EX-3 and GoPro material into the UserData file of an EXCAM disc via a U1 disc drive for archival and as a convenience to the editor but the Ninja's Pro Res or DNxHD files are so huge, I need multiple discs.  I did a test using the SD recording within the D800, which is about 24mbs, and Pro Res LT in the Ninja at 100 mbs.  Couldn't see the difference.  Nor could my editor.  The material  was 45GBs on the Ninja but just 9.5GBs on the SD card.  Since the disc is only 23GBs...well the math just works better.

And you can in fact dual record with the D800.  At least with the Ninja2 because I've did it for the test.

Cheers,

Allen S. Facemire
Atlanta, GA USA
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bcooter
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« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2013, 02:07:22 PM »
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basically when I am shooting interviews (or any video for that matter) it is for my website (http://www.brianhirschfeldphotography) and my youtube channel (BHPhotoWeekly) and I am generally shooting my Nikon D4 and Nikon D3s for these shoots. Generally I have had one mic on one camera and had that be all the audio and then try and have Final Cut Pro X sync them but this doesn't seem to be the best system. I am considering upgrading to some lavalier mic's and a new shotgun mic but don't know how I can get all of this audio to sync up in Final Cut Pro X.

I read this article about a device that does time coding (http://www.freshdv.com/2011/01) I don't know how effective this is or if there is a better quality device that does this. Any help would be appreciated. Also Microphone recommendations are welcome.  

As other people mentioned the best way is a shot list and a clap board. 

We used the ipad clap board but it takes too long and is much slower than just using an old fashion slam.

We routinely run two or three cameras and depending on the sound tech, always try to have sound go into every camera, if only for scratch purposes, but nothing insures ease of syncing than a clap board and keeping a shot description will save you a lot of time when you get to the editorial process.

One thing we've noticed when shooting non professional talent, is to let the camera run long.  Stopping at the end of each blooper and resetting tends to tense the talent up, when they hear Camera a rolling, camer b rolling, camera c rolling, ACTION!  The talent will tense up like the start of a race, so If someone blows a line I always just keep running (if possible), tell them not to worry your doing great, let's just try pick it up here at this point ______ and enjoy yourself.

But back to syncing, other than genlock the easiest way to sync is with a clapboard and I make sure that the board is in the front of every shot before we run the cameras.

At least that's the plan.

IMO

BC
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allenface
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« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2013, 08:26:51 AM »
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If you use FCP you can use PluralEyes I believe it's called. Easy syncing.  Avid has a built in plug in hat does the same thing. Don't even need a clap stick. Both use sound graph technology to achieve that.

Allen Facemire
DP Atlanta USA
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