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Author Topic: How to properly ship framed photographs?  (Read 2386 times)
HowieShultz
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« on: December 05, 2012, 07:00:06 PM »
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Can anyone suggest a link on line for me to check out, or point me to any other sources where I can learn about how to properly pack and ship a framed photograph?  Thanks.
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Stephen Girimont
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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2012, 07:27:56 PM »
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While specifically about shipping paintings, this seems like a decent way to pack framed photographs as well:
http://www.reddotblog.com/wordpress/index.php/how-to-ship-paintings-a-step-by-step-guide-for-artists-and-galleries/
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Gary Brown
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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2012, 08:08:31 PM »
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Also, Alain Briot's Shipping Your Photographs.
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HowieShultz
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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2012, 07:46:02 PM »
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thanks you guys...these were helpful....appreciate your help
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2012, 04:01:23 PM »
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Cardboard, meh!

Go to HD or Lowes.  Have them cut two equally sized doorskins or thin plywood, about 1/8" to 3/16" thick.  Buy some 1 x 3 lumber, Pine or Aspen is OK.  Screw the 1x3's onto one of the skins to make a kind of tray.  For maximum strength pre-drill pilot holes.  Put you piece in some plastic bags, then bubble wrap it.  Make sure everything is as snug as a bug in the tray.  Screw on the top.  Make sure nothing is rattling around.  Very high survival rate, this is how a lot of galleries do it for medium-expensive pieces.  If you want, include a return label so the buyer can return the case.  While it seems this produces a heavier package, you will still probably still be under the "dim weighted" equivalent weight that the shipper imposes on any large-but-light package, and you will pay the same.

I prefer to let the UPS Store handle my larger pieces.  That way they're responsible for the hassles that follow damage in shipping.  Which occurs around 20% of the time for large, cardboard wrapped pieces.  I kid you not.

Also, for UPS and other shippers, there is a certain package size where you suddenly are hit with a pretty robust "oversize" charge.  Know where that size is, which you can find out on their websites.

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framah
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« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2012, 08:43:01 AM »
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I agree with Bill on this. i'd like to add a bit to it tho... if the box is large enough, add stiffener ribs on the outside of the box so there is less chance of the sides being pushed in as well as adding handles of 1x4 so the drivers and the workers can pick it up. If they can actually pick it up, they are less likely to  drag it or push it or throw it. A little thought for the people handling it makes for a higher chance of it not being damaged.

Also forget the nonsense Alain says about using peanuts for packing.  Anything put into the peanuts will eventually settle down thru the peanuts till it is on the bottom of the box. Bubble wrap is the only way to REALLY protect anything.

If you use cardboard for mailing unframed pieces, remember to cross the corrugation of the CB so it stiffens  it overall. It is much easier for it to bend if all of the ribs are going in the same direction.
 I have also used a layer of bubble wrap and then a piece of 1/8" luan on each side and just fiber tape it all the way around.  The ply needs to be at least 1/2" larger  so it is what gets damaged if it is dropped on the corners.

Cardboard boxes are the LAST thing you want to use to mail anything of value.
Properly packed in a wood box you can even ship something with glass in it. Been doing it for 10 years or so with no damage ever.


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"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
Deardorff
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« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2013, 09:53:18 AM »
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Another option that works well is foam insulation board.

It comes in various thickenesses and can be matched to the artwork being shipped.

Layer it with the middle section cut out to fit the artwork. Wrap the artworks with bubble wrap and fit it in. If you are shipping with glass over the art cover the glass with the easy to remove painters masking tape for a bit more protection.

Then put foam pieces over the artwork, front and back and tape it up well.

You can paint the foam if you want and even put Logo's on it.

Lightweight, tough and if it gets caught in a flood - it floats.

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bill t.
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« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2013, 01:46:11 AM »
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Here's how Peter Lik does it.  The same seller has a Leaf Aptus II battery for sale.  Must mean something.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/121046257325
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