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Author Topic: Canvas stretched on only two bars?  (Read 2434 times)
framah
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« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2012, 03:49:58 PM »
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Personally, i'm fond of the camouflage  colored tape. You can hang a show in the woods and no one would notice.
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bill t.
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« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2012, 06:17:31 PM »
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My show managed to go unnoticed for a full two months COMPLETELY WITHOUT the use of camouflage tape!
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Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2012, 08:50:06 PM »
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Boy... ask a serious question and it all goes to the toilet! Wink

I guess this is not a popular method of display. lol
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Mike Guilbault
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bill t.
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« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2012, 09:31:57 PM »
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Not popular?  Hardly!

Today's two bar sightings...

--The UPS Store
--Walgreens Drug Store
--Albertsons Supermarket
--The local Starbucks clone
--Barns & Noble Booksellers

Had I gone into The Mall, the list would be huge!  There are more banners in that place than there are empty, 24" and 36" media cores in the dumpster behind Econo Print Masters LLC.

Most of those commercial banners were on cheap-as-dirt polypropylene and vinyl media.  Everybody's doing it!  I'm telling you, there's a commercial banner centric art exhibit just waiting to happen on La Cienega Blvd or in Soho.  It's still possible to be the first person to sell a commercial banner artpiece for $4.3M.

The possibilities are almost limitless...



And of course the Chinese have been doing it for eons...

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enduser
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« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2012, 01:42:50 AM »
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Scoff all you like but there's a seriously good market selling them to kids using,for example, class photos, their sport shots etc, and local shops love, and pay for them.  Not high art, I grant you, but real images to some. It's  a no-brainer when you think who might want a cheap big image,and are not looking for extended life.
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framah
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« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2012, 11:04:28 AM »
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Boy... ask a serious question and it all goes to the toilet! Wink

I guess this is not a popular method of display. lol


BAZINGA!!!
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enduser
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« Reply #26 on: December 11, 2012, 03:54:41 PM »
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Very strange response to your original question,Mike.  Is it almost beneath them in some weird way?
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bill t.
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« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2012, 05:32:54 PM »
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Nothing is beneath me.  Not even fun.  We are such serious birds here sometimes!

Everything has a history, a background, a reason, a mythology, a normal context, etc.  For those of us who deal in imagery and communicate ideas, it is important to understand the full range of possible meanings of the things we present, and that how we present them will affect how they are perceived.  Everything we do or present carries some built-in baggage with it, and we need to know what that baggage is lest it surprise us late in the game.  Sometimes a grain of salt provides a shortcut to explore those things in an objective manner, and sometimes a grain of salt helps one see one's self more clearly.

For all the blather here, I think we better understand the world of two-bar hangers (and similar schemes) and the place they have in our complicated, convoluted culture.

Example...use a two bar hanger in a serious gallery show.  Client walks up and says, "oh, that's just like at K-mart!"

Example...Client walks up and says, "oh, how cool, we saw some exquisite ancient scrolls presented that way at the Japanese Wing of the LA Country Museum!"

But I think for most people, two-bar hangers are going to invoke the retail windows down at The Mall and at other overtly retail venues.  An artist planning a show using two bar hangers needs to be aware of that inevitable connection because his message will surely be colored by it, whether he wants that or not.

So that's why I like to venture far afield to explore those things.

Wouldn't mind someday doing an art show using the visual genres developed for retail sales, not beneath me at all and of course it's already been done too many times to count.

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Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2012, 08:52:20 PM »
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Very strange response to your original question,Mike.  Is it almost beneath them in some weird way?

I can see why you may say that, however, I've been bantering back and forth with these guys for quite some time now and I'm perfectly ok with their 'style' of feedback.

I'm still educating myself on the Fine Art side of photography, so when I see something 'new to me', I ask about it here and get an honest answer, even if at times a little veiled. When it comes to displaying your work, they're the guys I want to hear from and I totally get their humour... maybe because it's kinda like mine - a little on the sarcastic side at times, but always presented with good intentions.

Framah and Bill.. please correct me if I'm wrong! Wink
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Mike Guilbault
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framah
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« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2012, 08:35:48 AM »
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No... you're good!! Grin

Sometimes, no matter how we try to be serious (right!), we just HAVE to have some fun.

I agree that perception is everything and unless your work invokes an oriental theme, then the system you are mentioning  will only give the impression of cheap and tacky. Now, remember... that is only my opinion and is worth but a few pennies more than what you paid me for it.

Also, many times, the customer is swayed by how expensive the piece looks. If it is in a cheap frame, then they feel that if the artist doesn't think it is worth enough to frame it right, then it mustn't be worth much. Same with pricing the piece. If an artist only prices a piece at $100, then the customer will also think it is only worth that much.

PERCEIVED value is an important part of the process of what we do when we sell.
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Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2012, 06:19:21 PM »
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My thoughts as well framah.  Time to raise my prices again!
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Mike Guilbault
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