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Author Topic: Too much coating?  (Read 2665 times)
bill t.
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« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2013, 07:04:02 PM »
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Sunset has the best physical qualities of any canvas I have used, except maybe Fredrix 777.  Surface texture not too polarized, not too stiff, and pretty good QC.  But a little weak in the gamut department, you need to have a steady hand on the soft-proofer with that stuff, especially in the cool colors.
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2013, 07:13:08 PM »
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Bill, I love BC's Lyve but MAN sooooo many cotton seeds on that!  I mean one out of two prints I do have a cotton seed embedded in the canvas.  Dark black spot.  And it's always in the light blue sky or bright yellow sun parts of the image.  I know there's ways to cut it out and try to hide it. But man what a pain!  And for $100 more than Reserve Matte Canvas I would expect it to be of better quality. 
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bill t.
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« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2013, 07:25:46 PM »
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Every once in a while I buy a roll of Lyve just to see where it's at.  Maybe I'm just lucky, but I have yet to get a roll that was more than about 2/3 usable.  As far as the emulsion goes Lyve is the best matte canvas out there, or maybe it's in a tie with Epson Exh Can Matte.  Sunset is a good canvas for subtle, realistic renditions of most types of landscapes, but it can disappoint with ruddy sunsets and transparent blue skies which Lyve can handle very nicely.  Of course, it you want to put the pedal to metal colorwise use either Crystalline, Epson Exh Canvas Gloss, or Black Diamond Gloss, all of which can compete with baryta papers.
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2013, 08:23:54 PM »
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Bill is the $100 price difference with LJ and the other companies you mentioned because of the wider color gamut that can be produced on that paper?
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bill t.
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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2013, 09:19:05 PM »
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Yup, you pay for the gamut.  In general better media costs more.  You also pay for the problems associated with the much thicker substrate, the best one of which is head strikes on the curled up edges which develop one edges of thick canvas that are off the roll for more than a few minutes.  Nothing is free.  Fortunately, there are ways of dealing with the curl, the chief one of which is to concentrate lots of printing in single sessions.  On my 8300 it also helps to have supplemental push-down clips riding each edge.  And at least for the Epson gloss canvas, recent batches have used a much softer substrate that almost eliminates the problem.

The gloss canvases can give you prints that are much stronger and much more dramatic than with matte canvas.  You can pretty much duplicate the look of good photographic papers, if that's your cup of tea.   Aesthetically speaking, the majority of art buyers respond favorably to eye-filling color, and only the minority to something like subtlety.  There is a direct, non-inverse relationship between amount of color, competitiveness, and profit.  And while such statements will surely be used against me when the Art Trials come, I must nevertheless stand fearlessly by them.
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