Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: canvas delivery  (Read 1234 times)
mstevensphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


WWW
« on: December 12, 2012, 01:29:28 PM »
ReplyReply

curious, those of you selling your canvases, how do you package them for delivery?
I do a lot of custom sizes and love the look but not the level of protection offered by clearbags. currently the solution is bubble wrap, but buying a several hundred dollar canvas from me seems like it should be packaged a little nicer. what do you use/like?
Logged
framah
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1180



« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2012, 02:12:00 PM »
ReplyReply

Are they stretched or not?
Big difference in that.
Logged

"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
mstevensphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2012, 04:15:57 PM »
ReplyReply

ready to hang finished product.
Logged
namartinnz
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 184


« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 04:35:21 PM »
ReplyReply

For my canvas prints I first cover in bubble wrap. Then I place a sheet of cardboard over the front of the canvas. Then I wrap the whole image in more cardboard. My framing is a little different though. The frame is made from poplar and 3mm mdf on the front surface making the whole frame a lot sturdier. I've walked on my frames and the canvas without damaging them. I've sent prints overseas this way with no issues of damage at all.
Logged

bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2012, 05:00:57 PM »
ReplyReply

If you're talking about shipping gallery wraps, you can sometimes get away with a lightweight box if the corners are well protected.

Check these out, which basically tightly couple loads on the corners to the stretcher bars, which may be OK with light packages.

http://www.uline.com/BL_2154/Foam-Protectors

The theory is, is you can keep the overall package light enough, gentle underhanded throws and drops at UPS will not result in damage from the weight of the package itself.  Art.com and other mass shippers of gallery wraps and small framed pieces take that approach, or something like it using beefed up cardboard corners.

But if your piece has a frame or weighs more than about 10 lbs, better make a simple crate, as discussed in a recent thread here.

When I hand large pieces of art to buyers at shows, I just wrap up about a foot of both ends, usually with the packing foam that comes in boxes of moulding.  Kind of puff it up around the corners, then stretch two 17" rubber bands around the foam at each end to secure it.
Logged
mstevensphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2012, 10:03:20 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm not so much talking about shipping. someone just bought a $800 canvas wrap, do you give it to them in brown cardboard?
Logged
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1875


WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2012, 10:06:37 AM »
ReplyReply

At fairs I use a combination of bubble wrap, large clear plastic bags and cardboard corners. I get the bubble wrap and corners at uline.com and get the clear bags from Costco
Logged

kdphotography
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 712


WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2012, 10:17:53 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm not so much talking about shipping. someone just bought a $800 canvas wrap, do you give it to them in brown cardboard?

For wall-sized portraits, I may use a sheet of glassine on top if deemed necessary, and then I wrap the piece in a large flannel blanket that has my studio name embroidered on the corner. The blanket provides padding and it also serves as a promo item for the client.  A clear plastic bag is then slipped over everything and tightly sealed.  It's a good presentation, and when a client invests a good sum of money, I think those little finishing touches matter.  If being shipped, then a foam blanket or bubble wrap follows, along with cardboard and corner guards, before being placed in a reinforced shipping container.

ken
Logged

Johnny_Boy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2012, 05:31:02 PM »
ReplyReply

This is what I do when I am at art shows.
1. S-12897   8 x 8" Bubble Corner Guards 250/carton.  ====> Use that on all four corners
2. S-12246   4 x 4" Corrugated Multi-depth Frame Protectors 400/carton. ====> Use that on top of the bubble corners.
3. Use 17" rubber bands to hold two corners together. Use 2.  
4. S-1759   36 x 60" 2 Mil Industrial Poly Bags 100/carton. ====> Put the whole package in this clear plastic bag.

My work is framed canvas on gator. But it should be about the same thickness as the thick gallery wrap.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 06:01:45 PM by Johnny_Boy » Logged
mstevensphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


WWW
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2012, 05:54:12 PM »
ReplyReply

Ken, I like the blanket idea, particularly since you don't have to stock so many different sizes for every different size of canvas. can I ask where you get them?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad