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Author Topic: Canvas Streching Tools  (Read 7693 times)
iCanvas
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« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2013, 07:15:44 AM »
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Do the "Pit Bull" or "BC stretch relief pliers" work on non gallery wrap stretcher bars? I never do gallery wraps. All my stretched canvas goes into frames. I have the canvas stretching machine for small pieces but have been using regular pliers for large pieces. Definitely stressing the wrist and hands. If the "Stretch Relief pliers" will work on non gallery wrap stretcher bars, I will definitely try one.

Gar
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2013, 08:03:58 AM »
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We have many folks tuned in here running the gamut from hobbyist to small or even mid size businesses.
I really do understand the issues from both ends.
Running a small business out of your home with limited space and maybe more important,limited funds is a pretty big issue.
I looked at quite a few machines before I purchased the Gallery Stretcher Machine and found it the best bang for the buck.
 I hear the term "giving up control" and am not sure what that really means. The control with this machine is right at your finger tips. Fast and easy to control the stretch.
Sure its $3500 but for me it boils down to time and ease of use before cost.
I am pulled about a dozen different directions every day of the week and extra time is something I do not have alot of.
The last thing I want to do is spend 20 minutes stretching a canvas if it can be done in 10.
Yes I have a business but am by no means a production shop. I rarely do more then 2 or 3 at one time.
 In fact most are one offs several times a week.
Many ways to skin a cat. You just have to determine how much time you want to put into each process.
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2013, 11:37:09 PM »
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iCanvas,
  if you're talking about the regular bars (3/4"), yes it does.  I use the Pitbull for all my wraps.  The way you can pull that thing so tight with 2 fingers is incredible.  Also if you accidentally edge up a side too much or too little and need control on how much stretch to put on only one corner or one edge, you can do that with the pitbull. 
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philbaum
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« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2013, 02:31:24 PM »
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Quote
We have many folks tuned in here running the gamut from hobbyist to small or even mid size businesses.
I really do understand the issues from both ends.

I appreciate Dan's comments.  I sold 33 canvas prints in the last 12 months from 10" to 36" but still i'm more hobbyist than professional, for sure.  So the issue for me is how to get by most efficiently with the minimum of outlay and space.

I have the old standard Fredrix pliers and its all i've been using up till now.  Ordered and received the Quickmate manufactured by Tabmaster in UK, also being sold by Gilderspaste.com in the US
http://www.gilderspaste.com/cgi-bin/shopper.exe?preadd=action&key=qmcsqmcs-o&reference=/cg..

My first attempt with the Quickmate was on a 30" canvas, and resulted in the long bar shifting inwards 1/4" (no stiffener) and was saved only by pulling 5 staples, correcting the bar position, and finishing it by hand. 

I don't want to use stiffeners for the 30" canvas i normally do, so i came up with this solution:  I put 3 staples in  each of the short bars, then assembled the Quickmate to pull the long bars.  With a balanced load like that, no shifting of stretcherbars occurred and no stiffeners required.  My 2nd attempt with the Quickmate was a success with the new technique.

There are now 3 versions of the Quickmate, which run from about 300 to 400 USD.  They are well built with one weakness.  The truckers strap ratchet which is used to power the Quickmate, is sort of cumbersome when used to assemble a fine art canvas, compared to holding down a trucker's load :-)  First of all, it needs finer ratchet teeth so the steps in pressure aren't so great, and secondly, it doesn't unload smoothly and seems to require a struggle on my part.  I may try to take it apart and do some filing here and there to get it to work smoothly.  And may shorten the spring a bit as its too strong now.   If i can refine the cumbersome ratchet a bit, then i will be very happy using it on the longer canvases i do. 

I don't have one, but i suspect that people are right to stick with the BC/Pit Bull type of pliers.  My only concern over them, is that they seem to require about 3" of canvas wrap for grip and leverage.  The Quickmate will work with as little as 2" of canvas wrap.    I would appreciate anyone commenting on the amount of canvas wrap needed for the Pit Bull pliers to work.



 



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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2013, 07:28:27 PM »
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Phil, the pitbull is a godsend!  It creates such a tight pull and you can control how much or how less to pull depending on alignment of canvas sides.  I use 2" of extra canvas all around to grip and pull perfectly although the maker recommends 1.5" I believe.  That device grabs on and won't let go no matter how hard you pull.  Only problem now is literally breaking the weak pre-cut stretcher bars that most stretchers use. 
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