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Author Topic: View camera's and the Sony RX 100  (Read 1505 times)
maxgruzen
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« on: December 16, 2012, 03:26:48 PM »
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  Shot alot of architecture years ago using large format film view camera. Lots of stuff to carry....you know what I mean.....all those film holders weighted a ton and needed there own big case. A real workout and a few days to shoot a job!
  So today my niece took me over to the  Salk Institute here in San Diego  and we stolled around for about a half hour and I shot a few quickies with the only thing I had......my RX 100 without my tripod.  Processed them up this morning and I was really blown away at what this little thing is capable of. The  RX 100 and Lightroom 4 does a better job for me, in a fraction of the time, with less effort then all my expensive gear from years ago.  It's been a long journey from my darkroom of 1948 to my computer of 2012.   http://www.pbase.com/mordicai/image/147888493
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PeterAit
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« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2012, 07:10:28 AM »
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I understand what you are saying. But, there's a part of me that misses the old view camera days. I never did it for a living, just for the love of it, so it may be different for me. When I went out with the view camera, every shot was carefully considered and while a day's shooting might be only 15-20 photos, most of them were keepers. Now it's clickity click click and 95% of photos are either uninteresting or essentially duplicates. In theory, I could impose more discipline on my shooting, but for whatever reason I Don't. The fact is that the view camera hardware and procedures forced me to be disciplined.
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Peter
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petermfiore
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« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2012, 08:30:18 AM »
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 I could impose more discipline on my shooting, but for whatever reason I Don't.
[/quote]

Because we don't have to. The "Have To" makes all the difference. Enjoy the lightness of being.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 17, 2012, 09:28:37 AM by petermfiore » Logged

Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2012, 09:16:47 AM »
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I could impose more discipline on my shooting, but for whatever reason I Don't.


Because we don't have to. The "Have To" makes al the difference. Enjoy the lightness of being.

Peter



Yes, and restrictions make you think.

Rob C
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joneil
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« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2012, 10:14:29 AM »
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I understand what you are saying. But, there's a part of me that misses the old view camera days. I never did it for a living, just for the love of it, so it may be different for me. When I went out with the view camera, every shot was carefully considered and while a day's shooting might be only 15-20 photos, most of them were keepers. Now it's clickity click click and 95% of photos are either uninteresting or essentially duplicates. In theory, I could impose more discipline on my shooting, but for whatever reason I Don't. The fact is that the view camera hardware and procedures forced me to be disciplined.

     That is exactly my experience.   Don't take me wrong, I carry a D700 (yep, the FX full frame camera) and use both current versions of Lightroom and Photoshop.  But when you go out with only 12 sheets of film, when you know every time you press the shutter it costs you $2.00 or more in film and chemistry, when setting up your camera takes some time, it's not just an instant  reflex and when you sit in the wet darkroom and you look at the cost of a sheet of fibre based paper, you really slow down, and you really think, you think harder than you ever do with digital.

  I would never give up my digital SLRs, (well, maybe some day down the road when I upgrade Smiley  ), but shooting LF is a whole different kettle of fish.  Not better, not worse, but it is a whole different "discipline" if you will.  I think anybody and everybody who is "serious" about photography should, even just for once in their life, try shooting large format, if for nothing else, just the experience of doing so.

joe



     
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2012, 10:47:23 AM »
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I think anybody and everybody who is "serious" about photography should, even just for once in their life, try shooting large format, if for nothing else, just the experience of doing so.

This sounds like a "kids today..." discussion.  One they're undoubtedly tired of hearing.

I'm very "serious" about photography.  To invoke "shooting discipline", I'd rather just pretend to have those large format limitations. Like many here, I lived with the limitations of film for my entire career. The cameras I used sometimes weighed more than one person could carry.  Now, similar image quality results from cameras that are easily held with one hand.

For me, there's no reason to shoot film ever again, whatever the size.
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maxgruzen
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« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2012, 06:44:08 PM »
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That's the point of my original post.  I would never shoot film again. I can do it BETTER with my little RX100.  Shooting with my Deardoff had soul, and spending days in the DARKroom was an event, but the whole process sends shivers down my spine when I think about the effort it took and the lack of options. Options that I have now with my tiny Sony. When I first went to Vietnam I was expected to use a 4x5 camera with film holders.......can you imagine!!! I used to haul 50lbs of shit up and down mountains in Korea to shoot pictures. Anyway, the advances over the last 12 years just blow me away. If your a photographer these days, ya got to love it!
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