Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Premiere Elements or CS6 for Video Editing?  (Read 4933 times)
Gordon Buck
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 409



WWW
« on: December 16, 2012, 07:58:20 PM »
ReplyReply

I realize mine is a simplistic question for this forum but still would appreciate the thoughts of those more experienced. 

I have several technical degrees and am using a reasonable 2 year old (but off the shelf HP system) Windows 7 system with 8GB RAM.

For some time, I've used Proshow Gold for video shows that primarily consist of stills plus a video clip or two.  I like Proshow Gold - probably because I've learned to use it.  Output has been to DVD, now Blu-Ray and sometimes YouTube.  I often add a sound track from recorded video.

I'm beginning to use more video.  OK, that's mostly because I now have a granddaughter!  I made a basic decision to not go to the full Premiere but to use Elements.  PE is OK although not particularly intuitive to me.  Still, I have PE 10 and have used it a little bit but not on Proshow-sized projects. 

I am reasonably proficient in Photoshop and beginning to learn Lightroom (V4).  I now have CS6 and see that it includes video.  With only a quick look at CS6 video capabilities, I am uncertain as to whether CS6 or PE 10 is best for me.

Can CS6 incorporate pans and zooms on stills added to video? Variations in transitions?

This is such a simple question but I'd rather not have to experiment with both CS6 and PE10 if the answer is obvious.


I'd like to think that CS6 is better for me than is PE10 but would appreciate any discussion.
Logged

Sareesh Sudhakaran
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 547


WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 08:39:36 AM »
ReplyReply

... I now have CS6 and see that it includes video.  With only a quick look at CS6 video capabilities, I am uncertain as to whether CS6 or PE 10 is best for me.

Can CS6 incorporate pans and zooms on stills added to video? Variations in transitions?

What do you mean by CS6? Assuming you mean Adobe Premiere Pro CS6, yes you can do all that and more. It has all the basic transitions, with total control. Plus you can also buy plug-ins for anything.

Quote
I'd like to think that CS6 is better for me than is PE10 but would appreciate any discussion.

Only you can answer that, and you can't until you try both and see what you're more comfortable with. Hope this helps.
Logged

Get the Free Comprehensive Guide to Rigging ANY Camera - one guide to rig them all - DSLRs to the Arri Alexa.
RFPhotography
Guest
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 08:18:59 AM »
ReplyReply

I think he probably means Photoshop CS6.  PS CS6 has some pretty decent video capabilities.  You can do pan/zoom effects in PS CS6, among other things.  This video shows how.
Logged
Gordon Buck
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 409



WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 09:21:33 AM »
ReplyReply

I think he probably means Photoshop CS6.  PS CS6 has some pretty decent video capabilities.  You can do pan/zoom effects in PS CS6, among other things.  This video shows how.

Yes, I meant Photoshop CS6.  That's a great link, Thanks.
Logged

Gordon Buck
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 409



WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2012, 08:41:57 PM »
ReplyReply

This is very frustrating; obviously I'm ignorant on the of basics of video editing but will eventually figure out a workflow that fits me.

Photoshop CS6 appears to offer all I need except that output (rendering) appears limited to .mp4 and .mov variants.  I don't see a way to output to a DVD or Blu-Ray from CS6.  At this point, it appears that I'd have to output to Quicktime .mov or an .mp4 variant, load that output into Premiere Elements 10 and then "Share" from PE10 to DVD or Blu-Ray.  What am I missing?

Alternatively, I could do initial trimming and add pans, zooms, etc in CS6 to make "clips" and assemble those clips in PE10.

In the past, I've found it convenient to use QuickTime Pro to trim and use those clips in PE10.  However, CS6 does not seem to like the QT clips (.mov format).



Logged

keithrsmith
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 107


« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 11:57:04 AM »
ReplyReply

I would suggest forgetting Photoshop for video editing.  You can do some work in it , but (IMO) it's not got the facilities you need as a video editor.  Download the trial of Premiere Elements and give it a try.  You get native handling of most video formats, multiple video and audio channels, effects, etc, and the ability to author DVD, Blueray and output to other formats.

Then download the trials of other editors - MAGIX, Vegas, to name but two. and give them a try.

Keith
Logged
PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1946



WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2012, 02:24:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Have you considered PowerDirector? A couple of years ago the reviews top-ranked it, ahead of Premier and all the others. A lot cheaper than Premier, too! My wife has ended up being the video maven in the family, so I can't comment on it's abilities, but might be worth a look.
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
Gordon Buck
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 409



WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2012, 03:53:47 PM »
ReplyReply

I've decided to return to Premiere Elements 10 -- which I already have but learned only the very basics -- now resolving to really learn to use it.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad