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Author Topic: Please Help Leaf Aptus Frozen!  (Read 6270 times)
Nigel Bewley
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« Reply #20 on: June 29, 2013, 03:26:31 AM »
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I had similar problems with my Leaf Aptus 65. I took the back into Calumet (in London) the store I bought it from. At first they thought it was corrupt firmware. That was updated but not the problem. The back (coupled to my Hasselblad) worked properly when tethered. As soon as a CF card was installed it froze and stopped working. I left the back with Calumet for further investigation and it was the e-box that was faulty. I got an estimate for repair and just less than 2 weeks later I've got it back, fully repaired, overhauled and 'as new'. That cost GBP1800 (£1800).  Ooooof!!
But what could I do? A new back was financially out of the question for me. A decent second hand back was more than the repair. Shooting tethered was impractical for me. I wanted to keep the Hassy but not to gather dust and not to shoot film with. The only solution was to go ahead with the repair.....
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andreagenor
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« Reply #21 on: June 29, 2013, 09:23:00 AM »
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My back come back this week, after about six months.
At first time they say, I need change the FW card and UV glass. About U$3.400
After some weeks they say there is one scratch in the sensor and is not viable to repair.
I said ok, send me back, I will make trade when I can.

When back arrived I but battery only for test if he is frozen yet and for my surprise he work normaly, turn on, tethered, I only not test with CF yet. there is no sensor scratch....he is works completly fine.

Now I don't know whats happened, but I'm happy! Smiley

Sorry my bad English.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #22 on: June 29, 2013, 10:59:57 AM »
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Hi,

Do you mean expensive but broken?

Best regards
Erik


Leaf's robust modular design looks like something inspired by military hardware.

Edmund
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sbernthal
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« Reply #23 on: June 29, 2013, 01:04:10 PM »
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FW board repair - you said you used a dirty cable.
This is a very bad idea - the FW board is the most sensitive part of the back.
Since you plug the cable in and out all the time, it is the place most likely to develop wear and failure.
If you want to avoid it, use only Leaf cables with their proprietary connector - they are expensive but using them (clean ones only!) will make the FW board failure much less likely, so they're worth it.

Also, note that you can pay $800 per year for continuing warranty, and then these fixes are for free.
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andreagenor
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« Reply #24 on: June 29, 2013, 03:42:22 PM »
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Yes, I have played my cable in the trash!
I find that my DB not burned the FW, it only frozen, so when they opened and changed boards for testing, it come back to the life.
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #25 on: June 29, 2013, 04:16:26 PM »
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Hello,

For me I am pleased that I have sold my Leaf Aptus 75 and to get that monkey off my back. My studio is now 100% Nikon D800’s and I couldn’t be more happier.

To have to rely on a piece of equipment which in most cases has to be returned to it country of manufacturer for repair and then get charged the cost of a Nikon D800 for that repair and of course the time to repair it is quite frankly absurd.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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sbernthal
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« Reply #26 on: June 29, 2013, 04:39:05 PM »
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Aptus 75 is a 2005 model.
D800 is a 2012 model.

If you were serious about medium format, you would have kept up, and upgraded to a new model every 3-4 years.
Then you are also always under warranty and don't have any problems with repair cost or replacement unit while waiting for repair.

I don't see how you can compare a 2012 machine to a 2005 machine, in an industry where every 3 years there is a new generation.
Also I don't think a digital back can be the secondary system.
For me I use always the digital back, and I revert to the Canon only when I absolutely must.
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #27 on: June 29, 2013, 05:04:52 PM »
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Hello,

The reason I never upgraded was in my opinion there was never any major improvements in design or technology with the MFB’s to warrant the expenditure. More pixels and that’s it.

Now the development of 35mm digital has been dramatic and I know the next generation from Nikon will be another leap forward.

In my business I have no room for redundant equipment which the Leaf Aptus 75 represented.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #28 on: June 29, 2013, 05:51:53 PM »
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Hi,

I would say that there has been much more development in DSLR/CMOS than MFD/CCD. It is also easier to justify spending 3000$ than 30000$, right?

But all this has little to do with the original posting, doesn't it?

Best regards
Erik

Aptus 75 is a 2005 model.
D800 is a 2012 model.

If you were serious about medium format, you would have kept up, and upgraded to a new model every 3-4 years.
Then you are also always under warranty and don't have any problems with repair cost or replacement unit while waiting for repair.

I don't see how you can compare a 2012 machine to a 2005 machine, in an industry where every 3 years there is a new generation.
Also I don't think a digital back can be the secondary system.
For me I use always the digital back, and I revert to the Canon only when I absolutely must.
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #29 on: June 29, 2013, 06:29:07 PM »
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Hello,

I think it does. My point is I think Andrea is flogging a dead horse when it comes to her MFB and should consider a different alternative in what brand of camera equipment she decides to use in the future.

My decisions on what camera system I have chosen is based on the sort of work I do and what I preserve as a good investment in lenses and camera bodies as well as reliability and ease of availability.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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sbernthal
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« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2013, 12:10:01 AM »
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Trust me, there were very major improvements since 2005.
I also started with a 2005 model, and upgraded twice since. The difference is staggering.
Not all the improvements are reported in the specifications.
Image quality is much much better every time a generation changes.
You didn't upgrade because you didn't like the form factor and handling, and maybe it wasn't right for you, but you can't pass judgement on models that you never used.
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #31 on: June 30, 2013, 12:46:47 AM »
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Hello,

It just wasn’t the MFDB’s that stopped me from up grading but the small selection of lenses and the quality of the MF cameras.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2013, 04:19:26 AM »
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"If you were serious about medium format, you would have kept up, and upgraded to a new model every 3-4 years."

What a bizarre notion?  Is camera ownership about taking images that satisfy clients expectations (or yourself if an amateur) and fitting in with your fiscal plans or about bragging rights and the acceptance by your peers for your vanity purchase?

having a career as a photographer is a 'serious' business and unless you have a wealthy benefactor is not something to waste money on with bad purchasing decisions. a lot of other advertising photographers i know only upgrade every 5 years if at all or they waited until the first 39mp backs were out and they are still using them today and see little point in spending 20k on something that doesn't change what they deliver to clients apart from bigger files.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 07:32:02 AM by MrSmith » Logged
andreagenor
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« Reply #33 on: June 30, 2013, 08:22:10 AM »
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Simon, I have D800 too.
I like the nikon, but I have some nostalgic feeling about work with MFDB and my Mamiya RZ, I love the slow down and thinking more about the picture.
Nikon is good because in my case, auto focus help a lot, but in future I will like change all to a H4x with IQ 260 or some like that.
This config is very expensive, but I feel that new MFDB delivery more 3D and rich images than DSLR.

Other thing, D800 and C1 is very slow, with aptus files C1 works much more fast and consistent.
I think with new generation IQ/Credo is much much better, not only file size, but flexibility for ajustments.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #34 on: June 30, 2013, 09:17:26 AM »
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+1



"If you were serious about medium format, you would have kept up, and upgraded to a new model every 3-4 years."

What a bizarre notion?
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sbernthal
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« Reply #35 on: June 30, 2013, 11:52:53 AM »
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So you know a lot of professional photographers using a digital system from 2005?

Every 5 years that you said, is so drastically different than every 4 years that I said? I find that distinction quite bizarre.


"If you were serious about medium format, you would have kept up, and upgraded to a new model every 3-4 years."

What a bizarre notion?  Is camera ownership about taking images that satisfy clients expectations (or yourself if an amateur) and fitting in with your fiscal plans or about bragging rights and the acceptance by your peers for your vanity purchase?

having a career as a photographer is a 'serious' business and unless you have a wealthy benefactor is not something to waste money on with bad purchasing decisions. a lot of other advertising photographers i know only upgrade every 5 years if at all or they waited until the first 39mp backs were out and they are still using them today and see little point in spending 20k on something that doesn't change what they deliver to clients apart from bigger files.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 11:55:31 AM by sbernthal » Logged
ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #36 on: June 30, 2013, 12:49:46 PM »
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Yeah,

Our friend Bcooter (James Russel) does just that. P25 and P30 I think.I also have the impression that he is very professional.

Best regards
Erik

So you know a lot of professional photographers using a digital system from 2005?

Every 5 years that you said, is so drastically different than every 4 years that I said? I find that distinction quite bizarre.


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MrSmith
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« Reply #37 on: June 30, 2013, 12:57:21 PM »
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No interest in arguing over the semantics. My comment still stands that to be serious about MFD you don't have to "keep up" and change your back every 3-4 years.
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sbernthal
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« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2013, 02:04:42 PM »
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Upgrading every 4 years is bizarre.
Upgrading every 5 years is normal.

I get it now.
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MrSmith
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« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2013, 02:10:44 PM »
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Well done.
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