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Author Topic: Framed matte prints: glass or no glass?  (Read 1929 times)
Jan Morales
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« on: December 23, 2012, 03:14:56 PM »
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To folks who are selling prints on matte paper and framed, are you selling the frames with or without glass?

I really like the look of the photograph on matte paper and I think covering it with glass defeats the look. On the other hand I don't know if it's OK to offer a framed print without the protection of glass.

What do you folks do? I appreciate any advice.
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SecondFocus
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2012, 06:45:06 PM »
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For more expensive works I have had in galleries, I use museum grade plexiglass. Almost perfect light transmission, non-reflective, UV protection, abrasion resistant and unbreakable.
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Ian L. Sitren
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Walt Roycraft
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« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2012, 07:02:02 PM »
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I use Tru Vue Conservation Clear glass. http://www.tru-vue.com/
I agree with you, that I like the look of the matte paper unobstructed, but I think it more important to
protect the print. We have a B&W print over our mantle printed with William Turner paper with Conservation clear glass
and I never notice the glass anymore.
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bill t.
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« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2012, 08:25:10 PM »
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A paper matte will sag and buckle without glazing such as glass or plex.

Assuming you have the print well protected with some kind of coating and good mounting, one option is to use what are called "liners."  Those are basically wood frames about 3/8" to 1/2" deep, with a bevel, covered with some sort of textured fabric.  They're rigid, so no buckling or sagging.

You can be just like Peter Lik!  Although unlike this picture he usually uses a $19/ft moudling from Roma called "Tabacchino."  It's really ugly!  It gives him a 4" moulding, with a 4" liner.  That means 16" of each dimension on the finished piece is framing stuff, rather than image.  The moulding in the picture in another (probably) Roma moulding that is a little nicer, IMHO.  When I was following that stuff, Lik usually presented the print face-mounted on plex, which is fitted into the rabbet grooves on the liner.

More common liner sizes are 1.25 to 2 inches wide, covered with white linen, although liners up to 5" wide are readily available.  Very handsome presentation, actually.  Makes an 8 ply paper matte look positively wimpy by comparison.



edit...I stopped using liners with my canvases because a lot of customers felt that looked "old fashioned."  They mostly prefer the look of a simple frame surrounding the print.  I usually use the widest possible frame that will work with the print.  Canvas somehow "forgives" such presentations, not sure you could get away with that with smooth paper prints.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2012, 08:31:18 PM by bill t. » Logged
Deardorff
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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2013, 09:40:02 AM »
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Acrylite OP3 is plexi made for framing. Lighter than glass and worth the cost. Provided UV protection and does not have the green cast normal float glass has.

After that, Museum glass as already mentioned.

Putting artwork behind glazing protects it from those who 'see' with their fingers. Also those who get very close and breathe on the artwork or talk while close and get spit on it.

If you frame using conservation standards and matting like Bainbridge Alpharag Artcare board you will give your work the greatest chance at lasting longer without damage.
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