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Author Topic: Monitor calibration  (Read 2203 times)
Jtaaffe
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« on: December 29, 2012, 02:41:26 PM »
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I have a Sony Artisan computer and flat screen monitor which I have calibrated using the on-screen device and software designed for the computer/monitor (Artisan Color Reference System.) It called for using CRS Print RGB-D50 as the colorspace. As a result of the calibration, I got an ICC profile which I then added to my computer and set as its default.

I happen to have purchased a Greytag MacBeth calibrating device a few years ago, and am wondering whether I should calibrate the monitor with that. That is, would one system have any advantage over, or be more accurate than,the other?


My next question is, What should my next step be? I think I now need to calibrate my monitor to my Epson 3880 printer using a good testprint. Will this process mean that I might end up with another ICC profile number? Should I then change the one I got from calibrating the monitor?
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Simon Garrett
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2012, 04:55:01 PM »
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I'm not familiar with Greytag Macbeth hardware, but you say you bought it "a few years ago".  Do you have the specific model name/number?  Colorimiters and spectrophotometers have improved somewhat in the last five years, and someone more knowledgeable about the specific hardware can say whether modern devices are better.

However, just one point: you don't calibrate your monitor to your printer. 
  • You calibrate/profile your monitor so that, with colour-managed software, it displays the correct colour. 
  • Similarly you profile your printer (or use manufacturer-provided profiles) so that, again, with colour-manged software it prints the correct colour. 
The two processes are independent.  Sorry if I'm saying something obvious to you. 
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Jtaaffe
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2012, 05:19:34 PM »
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Not at all. I'm new to the digital printing process, so any information helps.
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Jan Morales
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2012, 09:12:10 AM »
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Color management is a big subject. I would recommend you get a book on the subject. That's what worked for me. I got Real World Color Management by Bruce Fraser, Chris Murphy, and Fred Bunting, although I'm sure there are several excellent books out there.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2012, 12:42:02 PM »
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I happen to have purchased a Greytag MacBeth calibrating device a few years ago, and am wondering whether I should calibrate the monitor with that.

NO! The Artisan is a 'smart display' system (a reference display) which means it communications with the hardware in the display along with the software and mated colorimeter. Use that system! As to the proper calibration target values to set (maybe RGB-D50, maybe not), it all depends on the print viewing conditions next to the display. Do you result in a visual match? That's the key:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/why_are_my_prints_too_dark.shtml
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Andrew Rodney
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Simon Garrett
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2012, 04:15:22 PM »
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Also worth reading is Andrew's book “Color Management for Photographers" (see his signature line).  It's far and away the best on the subject I've come across. 
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Bryan Conner
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 10:33:54 PM »
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Also worth reading is Andrew's book “Color Management for Photographers" (see his signature line).  It's far and away the best on the subject I've come across. 

+1
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Dinarius
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2013, 11:55:28 AM »
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Also worth reading is Andrew's book “Color Management for Photographers" (see his signature line).  It's far and away the best on the subject I've come across. 

Has nothing changed since 2005, its year of publication?

D.
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Schewe
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 12:07:10 PM »
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Has nothing changed since 2005, its year of publication?

Aside from some OS level specific issues (such as Apple's ColorSync screwing up users or some driver problems of double color management on Windows) no, not much has changed. Sure, X-Rite bought Greytag and consolidated software/hardware offerings...but the purpose of those tools remain the same. The only main thing that has changed is that digital photographers have moved deeper into raw image processing on the front end of input into Photoshop with ACR/LR and the use of DNG Profiles for camera profiling instead of trying to make ICC profiles for cameras.

But, having talked to Andrew and other color geeks, there's not much need for (nor desire to) substantially revised books on color management.
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bjanes
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 01:55:32 PM »
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Aside from some OS level specific issues (such as Apple's ColorSync screwing up users or some driver problems of double color management on Windows) no, not much has changed. Sure, X-Rite bought Greytag and consolidated software/hardware offerings...but the purpose of those tools remain the same. The only main thing that has changed is that digital photographers have moved deeper into raw image processing on the front end of input into Photoshop with ACR/LR and the use of DNG Profiles for camera profiling instead of trying to make ICC profiles for cameras.

But, having talked to Andrew and other color geeks, there's not much need for (nor desire to) substantially revised books on color management.

Well, a few things have changed. We now have CIECAM02 which is used by the WCS (windows color magement system, see Steve Upton) and ICC ver 4. These may not be ready for prime time, but could help with the poor state of perceptual rendering for screen and print.

Joseph Wisniewski claims that applications use perceptual rendering for screen output and this is confirmed by Ellis Vener who frequently posts on LuLa and who appears to know what he is talking about. Andrew Rodney points out that available matrix profiles lack tables for perceptual rendering.

I've profiled my monitor as shown below in the first screen capture. The profile is tagged that Microsoft is the preferred ICM and the preferred rendering intent is perceptual. However, I don't the profile contains perceptual look up tables.

My color settings in Windows 8 are shown.

I don't have the slightest idea of what is going on and would buy a book that contains up to date information.

Bill


« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 02:43:09 PM by bjanes » Logged
Rhossydd
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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2013, 03:08:17 PM »
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some driver problems of double color management on Windows
I've not heard of that before. Can you give any references please ?
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risedal
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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2013, 04:28:31 PM »
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I have a Sony Artisan computer and flat screen monitor which I have calibrated using the on-screen device and software designed for the computer/monitor (Artisan Color Reference System.) It called for using CRS Print RGB-D50 as the colorspace. As a result of the calibration, I got an ICC profile which I then added to my computer and set as its default.

I happen to have purchased a Greytag MacBeth calibrating device a few years ago, and am wondering whether I should calibrate the monitor with that. That is, would one system have any advantage over, or be more accurate than,the other?


My next question is, What should my next step be? I think I now need to calibrate my monitor to my Epson 3880 printer using a good testprint. Will this process mean that I might end up with another ICC profile number? Should I then change the one I got from calibrating the monitor?

what you should take into account is that the color filters  (gelatin) in old calibrating devices deteriorates with age, how old are  your Artisan?
Why not try do make a monitor profile with Gretag Macbeth (is it EyeOne 2 or similar?) and se if there are any improvements of grey, greyscale, colors etc

Second, you shall calibrate your Epson for best results (how will you do that?)  and that profile has nothing to do with you monitor profile.
Are you using Photoshop you shall use Adobe ACE instead of windows color management and let Photoshop do the color management instead of the printers software



« Last Edit: January 30, 2013, 04:34:54 PM by risedal » Logged
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