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Author Topic: Film versus Digital: the current comparison  (Read 12377 times)
digitaldog
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« Reply #60 on: August 16, 2014, 10:07:56 AM »
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Believe what you like. The adoption of 'wedding' films (Kodak Portra, Fuji NPS/NPC) by high end editorial photographers in the 1990s is an important part of the history of the film medium. When allied with a good printer, the photographer could do things with colour negative film that were impossible with transparency.
There should be little need to debate that segments of the professional photo community used color neg B&W neg and transparency. For those who's final was 4 color reproduction to a halftone, the vast majority was shot on transparency film. But the professional wedding and portrait market indeed used color neg film. What shouldn't need to be debated is the ausurd statement that: slide film is for amateurs .
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Andrew Rodney
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #61 on: August 16, 2014, 08:33:15 PM »
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There should be little need to debate that segments of the professional photo community used color neg B&W neg and transparency. For those who's final was 4 color reproduction to a halftone, the vast majority was shot on transparency film. But the professional wedding and portrait market indeed used color neg film. What shouldn't need to be debated is the absurd statement that: slide film is for amateurs .

Yes. Slide films were used primarily by pros and advanced amateurs (overwhelmingly male).
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Jim Pascoe
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« Reply #62 on: August 20, 2014, 06:12:50 AM »
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Yes. Slide films were used primarily by pros and advanced amateurs (overwhelmingly male).

Is there a reason you have mentioned numerous times in the past few posts the gender difference in use of negative or transparency film?  I only ask because while it may or may not be true - I cannot see it has any relevance.  I agree that most 'serious' amateur photography was a male dominated pastime years ago - but that was because the man of the house probably controlled the purse strings and thought a compact type camera was plenty for the little woman and he should take share of the real pictures.  Which is a huge shame.  A very good friend of mine was in this situation until her husband died about 20 years ago.  He would never let her use the 35mm camera.  She took up 'serious' photography at the age of 55 and has since produced some outstanding work.  Luckily digital photography has emancipated the female photographers at last and has democratised photography.  Another female friend recently attained her Associateship of the Royal Photographic Society with a panel of prints shot on a Panasonic TZ compact camera.  At last the limiting factor is imagination and creativity - not what type of camera you can afford.

Anyway - on the subject of film v digital I would say each to their own.  It's a creative medium - just use what you enjoy.  I switched to digital in 2001 and never looked back really.  I miss the old workflow - shooting, dev film, printing etc, but it is nostalgia really.

Jim
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Petrus
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« Reply #63 on: August 20, 2014, 07:27:21 AM »
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There should be little need to debate that segments of the professional photo community used color neg B&W neg and transparency. For those who's final was 4 color reproduction to a halftone, the vast majority was shot on transparency film. But the professional wedding and portrait market indeed used color neg film. What shouldn't need to be debated is the ausurd statement that: slide film is for amateurs .

During the last years of film use before and around the year 2000 in our publishing house we had started to use more and more color negative film for both 135 and 120 sizes. This was because the latitude, ISO speeds and grain of color neg started to be clearly better than with reversal film. It also caused slower workflows (no in-house developing and printing) as reproduction was done from 24x30 or 30x40 prints. Not to mention the cost of having one-off prints made by hand in a pro lab. Those were the financially good days, now that would not be tolerated anymore.
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #64 on: August 20, 2014, 08:34:30 AM »
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Is there a reason you have mentioned numerous times in the past few posts the gender difference in use of negative or transparency film?  I only ask because while it may or may not be true - I cannot see it has any relevance.  I agree that most 'serious' amateur photography was a male dominated pastime years ago - but that was because the man of the house probably controlled the purse strings and thought a compact type camera was plenty for the little woman and he should take share of the real pictures.  Which is a huge shame.  A very good friend of mine was in this situation until her husband died about 20 years ago.  He would never let her use the 35mm camera.  She took up 'serious' photography at the age of 55 and has since produced some outstanding work.  Luckily digital photography has emancipated the female photographers at last and has democratised photography.  Another female friend recently attained her Associateship of the Royal Photographic Society with a panel of prints shot on a Panasonic TZ compact camera.  At last the limiting factor is imagination and creativity - not what type of camera you can afford.


Jim

I worked in photo retailing in the past. Though some women had good equipment, most used the simplest and least expensive, and used color negative film, as their photos were mostly for family. Photography was not an end in itself. I bet 99% of 126 and 110 cameras were sold to women. The men customers tended to be serious hobbyists (most were doctors, dentists, professors or businessmen); they owned Alpas, Leicas, and Hasselblads. Most used transparency film and had projectors and screens.
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Telecaster
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« Reply #65 on: August 20, 2014, 03:05:07 PM »
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I worked in photo retailing in the past. Though some women had good equipment, most used the simplest and least expensive, and used color negative film, as their photos were mostly for family. Photography was not an end in itself. I bet 99% of 126 and 110 cameras were sold to women. The men customers tended to be serious hobbyists (most were doctors, dentists, professors or businessmen); they owned Alpas, Leicas, and Hasselblads. Most used transparency film and had projectors and screens.

Lotsa kids owned 110 and/or 126 cameras. Me for instance, along with my childhood friends Greg & Dona. I still have my Kodak 110 (two unused flashbulb doohickies too!) but the 126s are long gone. Digging through my dad's photo archive last year I found two boxes of 126 Kodachrome slides I took during a spring 1972 holiday in Florida. Quality is pretty good.

-Dave-
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melchiorpavone
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« Reply #66 on: August 20, 2014, 03:27:27 PM »
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Lotsa kids owned 110 and/or 126 cameras. Me for instance, along with my childhood friends Greg & Dona. I still have my Kodak 110 (two unused flashbulb doohickies too!) but the 126s are long gone. Digging through my dad's photo archive last year I found two boxes of 126 Kodachrome slides I took during a spring 1972 holiday in Florida. Quality is pretty good.

-Dave-

Yes, kids too, no question of that.
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