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Author Topic: Green House  (Read 1352 times)
Chris Calohan
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« on: January 10, 2013, 09:33:32 AM »
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« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 12:28:04 PM by chrisc » Logged

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tom b
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 12:04:52 PM »
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I think you need this page.

Cheers,
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 12:28:55 PM »
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Weird, I made the change on the original edit but forgot to do it on the posted version...it's changed now, though it is really more turquoise than either green or blue.
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Isaac
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 01:10:29 PM »
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Yep - turquoise.
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Tonysx
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2013, 05:28:56 PM »
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Nah! This is green

Shot in Eureka, N. California.  Cheesy Cool Cool Cheesy
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 05:32:17 PM by Tonysx » Logged

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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2013, 07:10:00 PM »
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I think you need this page.

Cheers,
I don't like that test, because I don't see ANY number on any of the charts (except the sample at the beginning).
The original Ishihara tests, and others I've seen, at least provide a different number (or letter) on each chart for us color-challenged folks, so we don't feel so bad about it. Most of us with defective color vision distinguish differences first based on luminance and only secondarily on color.

Oh yes, and the house does look sort of turquoisish to me, too.  Wink
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 07:25:37 PM »
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...].. I don't see ANY number on any of the charts (except the sample at the beginning)


Aha Eric!!! At last a clue to your exquisite tar folios!!!
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2013, 07:39:34 PM »
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I saw all the silly numbrs. I am not color blind nor tone deaf but while I can shoot a relatively decent photo, I cannot play music, compose it or sing...

But, what of the shot, sans the color identification issue? I really pushed the processing a bit here to try to capture that NW Florida, "the land takes it all back, sooner or later," feel.
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2013, 10:24:45 PM »
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Aha Eric!!! At last a clue to your exquisite tar folios!!!
You mean the green ones or the blue ones?   Cheesy


And Chris: I like the house. It has a nice mood. If you tell me it's really orange, I might not believe you.
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2013, 07:49:00 AM »
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But, what of the shot, sans the color identification issue? I really pushed the processing a bit here to try to capture that NW Florida, "the land takes it all back, sooner or later," feel.

...the thinking for me, having looked beyond the processing was, Chris has a great location, dripping with possibility for an environmental portrait of an humble abode...I wish he had given the environs room to tell something of both their stories. I wish he had spent time there to hear the breathing of the story. Now I Know, because you stated so, what your intent had been, but the processing first needed the story to tell...that story needs to be able to speak out from the image for itself. Watching your work I really do believe you would find great reward in not moving on so quickly from a location you discover...give yourself the time to allow that history to seep in, to steep within your mind as you study the light, the grip of the environment, the story it is trying to pass on through you.

Once you have that capture, play all you'd like from duplicates of that capture...you'll find yourself discovering even more and be almost anxious to return to find more of the story...

If you have the opportunity take a long open look at the Arnold Newman portraits for clues on allowing the capture to tell the story...

(another small aside, the "frames" can certainly be part of the play, but in this case the frame does not grow organically out of the image or breathe with the story, but for me is simply a piece of whimsy added as an additional roadblock to the story which was in your mind, but which has not yet been released in the image..) I hope you take this in as an offering intended in an entirely positive way...
p.
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2013, 09:50:42 AM »
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...the thinking for me, having looked beyond the processing was, Chris has a great location, dripping with possibility for an environmental portrait of an humble abode...I wish he had given the environs room to tell something of both their stories. I wish he had spent time there to hear the breathing of the story. Now I Know, because you stated so, what your intent had been, but the processing first needed the story to tell...that story needs to be able to speak out from the image for itself. Watching your work I really do believe you would find great reward in not moving on so quickly from a location you discover...give yourself the time to allow that history to seep in, to steep within your mind as you study the light, the grip of the environment, the story it is trying to pass on through you.

I can stand almost in any spot in the countryside around me and watch the decay or as I like to think of it, the reclamation by nature, take place. Even my yard has to be meticulously maintained or the jungle will get it back. In this particular capture I could not get closer because of all the posted "No Trespassing" signs.

Once you have that capture, play all you'd like from duplicates of that capture...you'll find yourself discovering even more and be almost anxious to return to find more of the story...

I went through considrable edits before I found the magic in this one.

If you have the opportunity take a long open look at the Arnold Newman portraits for clues on allowing the capture to tell the story...

Love Arnold Newman. I've always been especially drawn to his portraist of Edward R. Murrow and Francis Bacon

(another small aside, the "frames" can certainly be part of the play, but in this case the frame does not grow organically out of the image or breathe with the story, but for me is simply a piece of whimsy added as an additional roadblock to the story which was in your mind, but which has not yet been released in the image..) I hope you take this in as an offering intended in an entirely positive way...

The whimsy or not of the frame was more to provide closure in the same sense of environmental angst to lock the moment as tomorrow it may well be quite a different story.
p.

There will never be a moment in my growth as a photographer when someone's comments cause me to do any more than take a harder look, a longer look or a different look. Thanks very much for your comments. Very introspective.
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2013, 10:26:02 AM »
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.. wish he had given the environs room to tell something of both their stories.
p.
Wink
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Isaac
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2013, 12:05:55 PM »
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I can stand almost in any spot in the countryside around me and watch the decay or as I like to think of it, the reclamation by nature, take place.

Perhaps the condition of new foreclosed homes after very few years without AC would make a stronger statement.
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2013, 12:09:31 PM »
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Perhaps the condition of new foreclosed homes after very few years without AC would make a stronger statement.

In less than two months, summertime, the mold would put you in the hospital. In four months not even the best mold removal cleaning agencies could make it liviable. Just look at the houses in Mississippi and Louisiana  three months after Katrina.
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Isaac
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« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2013, 12:37:27 PM »
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I agree that photographing with respirator and gloves and goggles doesn't sound much fun.

I think the decay / reclamation by nature over a few months would be a surprise to most of us.
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Fine_Art
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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2013, 03:48:57 PM »
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I don't like that test, because I don't see ANY number on any of the charts (except the sample at the beginning).
The original Ishihara tests, and others I've seen, at least provide a different number (or letter) on each chart for us color-challenged folks, so we don't feel so bad about it. Most of us with defective color vision distinguish differences first based on luminance and only secondarily on color.

Oh yes, and the house does look sort of turquoisish to me, too.  Wink


Color challenged photographers? OMG
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2013, 07:05:28 PM »
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Color challenged photographers? OMG
Well, yes.
And I'm an acoustically-challenged musician, too, but I play flute in a klezmer band, thanks to excellent hearing aids (which don't do a thing for my color-blindness).

Most of my photography is B&W, except for abstracts in which the exact color may not matter so much.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 07:07:07 PM by Eric Myrvaagnes » Logged

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brandtb
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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2013, 07:13:22 PM »
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...look at...Viridian...a cool green...and staple fundamental green on many millions and millions of painter's palettes...Van Gogh, Sargent...to name two
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