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Author Topic: Post Apocalyptic Image Rescued by Improved Software  (Read 3478 times)
bill t.
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« on: January 13, 2013, 02:16:58 PM »
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Playing with my new computer I stumbled across some 6 year old .nef's which were beyond help from either PS or LR at the time.  But LR4, with a little help from its friends, took 'em in stride and gave me results I could only have wished for way back when.  Makes me realize how good some of our basic software has become in the just the last couple years.

Three DX2, 12mp shots stitched together and corrected to rectilinearized perfection in PTGui 9's wonderful, real time scheimpflug screen.  PTGui too has greatly improved and is more than worth the upgrade price from version 8.  Less than 1 pixel automatic stitching error with a severely upturned 22mm lens, PS eat your heart out!

This location is part of the old Santa Fe Railroad maintenance facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  Think Jiffy Lube for steam engines.  Sitting in this state since closing in 1969.  The blocks on the floor are replaceable wood floor tiles that first frost-rived into domes from water dripping from the ceiling, and then collapsed into piles.

You may think this looks grungy and industrial, and it is.  But pictures of the facility are local favorites and when printed very large make irresistible, room-opening wall decorations with special appeal to architects, lawyers, and other worldly types with big reception rooms and big spaces behind their desks.  Don't be shy about gnarly shots, you just need to be able to reach the right demographic.

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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2013, 02:29:36 PM »
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Don't be shy about gnarly shots, you just need to be able to reach the right demographic.

Congrats on the processing, Bill. Bet this looks great big. And thanks for the "gnarly" advice.
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2013, 02:35:34 PM »
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Trust me Bill, all that rust and rubble makes for a truly memorable image.
Beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder.

Tony Jay
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opgr
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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 02:45:56 PM »
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You may think this looks grungy and industrial, and it is. 

And so the processing fits the subject. Well done. Looks great as is, no doubt looks even better large. I so wish I could visit that spot. Isn't it dangerous considering the age and state of the construction?
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2013, 04:37:26 PM »
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Have always loved these abandoned repair off sides. We have them hidden away and overgrown in the East too, sometimes with the reversing planes still intact. Love what you have done with these "finds".
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 05:26:44 PM by Patricia Sheley » Logged

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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2013, 05:12:15 PM »
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Spectacular! Glad you never threw it away.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2013, 08:22:07 PM »
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Bill, One of my favorite places to shoot too. Unfortunately they have cleaned it up too much IMO now for some movie sets.
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Kirk

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bill t.
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2013, 08:37:23 PM »
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Bill, One of my favorite places to shoot too. Unfortunately they have cleaned it up too much IMO now for some movie sets.

Exactly the problem, which is why I'm so pleased to be able to reclaim those old shots, which were actually made to pitch movie productions!  And in some places there is artificial patina that should have been removed at the end of production, but wasn't.  I did those shots gratis and I'm glad now I didn't sign away the images.  While I have a few shots that benefit from the cleanups, this particular space looks just too sanitary now.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2013, 08:42:07 PM »
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My compliments, Bill.
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Justan
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 09:42:51 AM »
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Since I started studying works by Andreas Gursky, I’ve become fascinated with interior spaces, and your work above is another example of why that kind of subject and large scale treatment is so appealing.

Thanks for the post!
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bill t.
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« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2013, 04:38:30 PM »
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why that kind of subject and large scale treatment is so appealing.

One possibility offered by large scale photographs is that they can be narrative in character, containing multiple subjects and small scale details that are hypertext-like in that they can be examined closely for more information.  Large scale photos invite exploration, whereas small scale photos are (usually) single subject statements that are immediately apparent.  Large scale photos can invite you roam within the image, small scale photos tend to say "look at this."  And photos that are single subject generally fail when printed big, inviting the disdain of anti-printed-biggists.

To properly experience large scale photos one must see them in person.   When properly used, bigness serves the viewer by presenting a wealth of useful information seen more clearly for the size.  All such pictures tend to fail at web size.  I chose the one in the OP just because it could alias as a single statement shot, but the real interest is in the details visible on a print.

Gursky RhineII at 2240 x 4000.  One of his least narrative photos, actually, but I guess you learn a lot about how that lawn was mowed and I have looked at the Rubber Stamp Tool differently ever since.  Of course there are a lot of these guys in field.  Gregory Crewdson is a more contrived and sentimental offshoot who I have to admire simply for the beauty of his prints, which are among the best I have ever seen at any scale.
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Justan
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« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2013, 09:37:11 AM »
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…anti-printed-biggists…

First I wanted to note that this is one of the better quips I’ve come across recently.

I agree that large scale invites not only visual exploration but it also encourages people to let their imagination explore in a way smaller photos or smaller art in general cannot do. The impact owing to scale dominates the visual senses and tends to push everything else aside. Of course, movie makers have known this for generations.

In addition, Gursky has turned his back on the traditional photographic concept of the simple subject. His works are all complex and only rarely do they even appear to be simple. His “Kamiokande,” noted below, is about as close to a simple subject as he gets.

I hadn’t come across Gregory Crewdson until you mentioned it, so used Mr G to help show me a few dozen of Crewdson’s works. I agree he has a sentimental and contrived style, but don’t see the relationship between him and Gursky. I also didn’t come across any of vast interior spaces by Crewdson.

Gursky has several works that echo the work you presented. The one that immediately comes to mind is his “99 Cent”
http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2001/gursky/images/99cent_main.jpg which is an image about tiny repetitive but visually notable details which fills out a vast space.

In the same way visually, but very different aesthetically is his “Siemens Karlsruhe” http://www.phillipsdepury.com/Xigen/lotimg/ANDREAS-GURSKY/UK010312/30/350/true

From here it is leap to his “Kamiokande,”http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lwk70bfXNL1qb9tquo1_1280.jpg  which is visually very different from the ones above, yet, again about what appears a lot of small repetitious details that are used to fill out a large space.

Lastly for now and the one that the OP is most similar is his “Hong Kong Island”
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_5bVN3kXOxFc/TT1Lvv-XeQI/AAAAAAAACzg/2B-N3FkfD1Y/s1600/1994+Hong+Kong+Island.jpg  where we have an interior of sorts in the process of being created. This amounts to a double entendre, compared to many of his earlier works.

I’m intrigued by works such as this as they bring the viewer in to examine the image and in so doing, opens a door to the viewer’s imagination.

All of these are examples of why an official pano head is on the short list of things to be added to my meager collection of camera hardware. One of Gursky’s best tricks, is that he does panos that do not look like panos, because he mostly keeps the x and y axes to ratios that are standard for photos.
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framah
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« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2013, 09:44:56 AM »
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You know, Bill... I know  someone up in Maine (me) who happens to have an 11880 printer that could print that thing REALLY large for you!! (hint,hint)

Of course, then I'd have to drive out and personally deliver it. Grin

...and I'd have to  carry all of my camera equipment for added stability while driving.
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"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
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