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Author Topic: Eric Meola article  (Read 24070 times)
jjj
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« Reply #160 on: February 05, 2013, 11:58:04 PM »
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afaik the world is actually awash in electromagnetic radiation across a wide spectrum of frequencies; a very small part of which we sense as visible light, a tiny part of which we sense as heat on our skin, and a tiny part of which we sense as sun burn.

"B+W" photography is no less a transcription from the world, because it does not differentiate frequencies in the visible spectrum.

Infrared photography is no less a transcription from the world, because it records EM radiation at a frequency we do not see.
Except that is of no relevance as you missed the point. Yet again.
We see in colour not B+W, not IR, nor any other par of EM spectrum. So by not shooting in a normal colour space you are changing how reality as seen by humans is depicted.
B+W is only accepted as 'real' as it came before colour photography and thus became accepted as the norm. However if it had been invented afterward colour, then it would possibly be along viewed with other looks such as HDR or hyper saturation as unreal and therefore not acceptable in photojournalism competitions.


Quote
"However 'creative' a photographer may be, he is ultimately dependent upon what physically exists in the world: no filter made will transform a frog into a prince. On the other hand, music, as Stravinsky stated, expresses only itself -- its laws, its forms, its -- not the world's -- reality. Consequently, the composer is, in an absolute sense, 'freer' than the photographer; so, too, in the framework of picture making, is the traditional artist."
John Caponigro quoted in The Wise Silence p180.
Oh yes, you're right people who write music can make up new notes and other  of music all the time. Oh wait they don't do that at all.
They use the same few notes and the majority of the time in contemporary music at least, they also use the same structure [4/4 time] on which to hang the notes. With the rare dabble into 3/4 or 5/4 time.
So composers are just as constrained, albeit in a different way.
Besides photographs can be expressed in other ways with their own laws and realities by such photographers as for example.....let me think, oh yes - John Caponigro with his gravity defying flying rocks.  Tongue
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« Reply #161 on: February 06, 2013, 12:28:21 AM »
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The creative process doesn't end until the final print, or processed electronic image, has been made. The role of Photoshop in the processing chain is just another tool, like the camera is a tool, or the pen or the paintbrush.
Absolutely.

All too often I've seen photographers criticise using Photoshop as cheating and not real photography, yet would happily accept artificial lighting, filters or cross processing.

 
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« Reply #162 on: February 06, 2013, 09:21:50 AM »
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The camera may record the hues, shades and detail more precisely than a written record, but not necessarily the emotional experience felt at the time.

Choose an appropriate medium to express the emotional experience -- try poetry.


The role of Photoshop in the processing chain is just another tool, like the camera is a tool, or the pen or the paintbrush.

Thus -- photographing, drawing, painting; and now photoshopping1.
Hence -- photographer, drawer, painter; and now photoshopper2.

1,2 "The Photoshop trademark must never be used as a common verb or as a noun."
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 03:05:36 PM by Isaac » Logged
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« Reply #163 on: February 06, 2013, 10:33:23 AM »
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We see in colour not B+W, not IR, nor any other par of EM spectrum. So by not shooting in a normal colour space you are changing how reality as seen by humans is depicted.

"To satisfy yourself that rods do not mediate color, get up on a dark moonlit night and look around. Although you can see shapes fairly well, colors are completely absent. Given the simplicity of this experiment it is remarkable how few people realize that they do without color vision in dim light."

Eye, Brain and Vision, Chapter 4 "Color Vision", page 7

(And then there's color constancy, and... By "shooting in a normal colour space you are changing how reality as seen by humans is depicted" because what cameras record is not what people see.)


B+W is only accepted as 'real' as it came before colour photography and thus became accepted as the norm.

March 1514 -- Portrait of the Artist's Mother at the Age of 63 -- Charcoal+W


Oh yes, you're right people who write music can make up new notes and other  of music all the time. Oh wait they don't do that at all.

It wouldn't be me that was right or wrong -- it would be Stravinsky; and he didn't say "people who write music can make up notes" that's just a strawman you put in his mouth.


... by such photographers as for example.....let me think, oh yes - John Caponigro with his gravity defying flying rocks.  Tongue

To be charitable, you didn't notice my typo -- the quote was from the father not the son.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 01:40:52 PM by Isaac » Logged
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« Reply #164 on: February 08, 2013, 01:02:13 PM »
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If that is indeed creativity, then I do not really care much about it anymore.

Compared to the denial expressed by other responses, I think that's a sensible beginning.

Pete Turner (a photographer mentioned in Eric Meola's article) saw the difference between make and take, and did both; and pushed into fake (for want of a less perjorative term) long before Photoshop made it so so easy.

tl;dr make(+take) vs take vs (take+)fake

    make(+take)
    • Cigar Earring, Kenya, 1970 -- "Cigar Earring wears a tin cigar container that I got from Harold. I thought it would make an interesting shape. I guess I'm not a purist in terms of reality. I make pictures. They're a combination of made and found images."
    • Flying Women, Dominica, 1976 -- "Composed and orchestrated on location specifically for this result. Viewing the photograph upside down, as it is reproduced here, makes the women seem to fly."
    • Cannonball, Mozambique, 1980 -- "I realized that I had a circular, geometric shape in a fort that was all straight-line geometry. The textures were great and it was a beautiful time of day, so I started placing cannonballs around the fort."

      take
      • Ibiza Woman, Ibiza, 1961 -- "I waited until a woman crossed the street. When she hit the curb with her foot, the composition felt just right. This, in a sense, is as close as I ever came to doing reportage photography."
      • The Old Man and the Sea, 1966, Nazaré -- "You don't make an image like this. You don't make a day with an incredible storm, graphic waves. I just managed to take a few frames before the man walked away."

        fake(+take)
        • Ayers Rock 1, Uluru National Park, 1983 -- "I had been impressed with photographs I'd seen of the rock reflected in pools of water. I created my version -- a perfect mirror image flopped and combined in the optical printer."

        (Quotations from Pete Turner: Photographs.)


        Let's say make is about what Rob C. means by creativity, and take is about acuity; then even though fake is not creative in that sense, it can still be imaginative. Eric Meola's article seems to make a stronger complaint -- current landscape photography is neither creative nor imaginative.
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