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Author Topic: Keeping Warm....  (Read 1872 times)
novascotiaskier
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« on: January 14, 2013, 03:53:13 AM »
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I get a lot of benefit from having questions answered on LuLa, but don't contribute that much, since most of the questions are beyond my skill.  But I do know how to stay warm, and I thought I would post this article from my blog as a sort of "down payment"

http://blog.scottcampbell.nl/2012/12/keeping-warm.html
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aduke
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2013, 11:13:04 AM »
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Thank you for posting this. I live in a warm climate, the desert of central Arizona, but visit the Grand Canyon on occasion. Since the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is 5000 to 6000 feet higher, it is much colder. We went there just before Christmas and had a terrible time with the cold, 15 degrees F, wind 15 knots.

This article should help outfit us in the future.

Alan
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2013, 01:44:10 PM »
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That is an exceptionally well written explanation as how to stay warm in cold weather...and it is exactly why I never go where it's cold. I spent one winter in Aspen and thought I would never be warm again.

Anything below 60F, I whine - loudly; below 50F and the whine turns to blubbering and whimpering with some visible shivvering, below 40F, I cry. I want my mommy, I want a fireplace with a roaring log, I want someting hot to drink..I want to snuggle up with someone special. If it goes below that, and even though I am in Florida (the north part) and have experienced single digits, I get in my car and head for the Keys... Yes, I am a major wuss!
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Walt Roycraft
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2013, 02:39:07 PM »
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Great stuff Scott!!!
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2013, 03:12:41 PM »
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... Anything below 60F, I whine - loudly; below 50F and the whine turns to blubbering and whimpering with some visible shivvering, below 40F, I cry. I want my mommy, I want a fireplace with a roaring log, I want someting hot to drink..I want to snuggle up with someone special...

 Grin Grin Grin (with regards from Chicago)

Then you'll love this: LA Overreacts to Cold Temperatures
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Chris Calohan
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2013, 03:47:29 PM »
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I lived in LA when it got cold but don't remember anyone ever going that freaking crazy about it...I really don't like cold but I can deal with it better than some of those newscasters...well at least until I get my car warmed up, then I'm southbound... Grin
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2013, 04:26:13 PM »
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Great and thorough article! As you said, you chose not to address the iron/activated carbon warmers here,(albeit keeping in mind that frostbitten, bare or skin compromised by poor circulation should not make contact,) but for photographers they are worth the bit of extra weight in your pack. They have various hours of effectiveness, so depending on how long you are out they can be of great value in keeping your extra batteries strong when tucked in their general area of your pack, while the one that will be immediately be needed next can be kept within layers closer to your body.

I have in the past experienced being able to get the few extra shots I had not anticipated staying out for by placing a hand warmer and the expended (by cold) battery in an extra insulated glove for a bit.

The note about testing the wind blocking ability as you shop, or dress is brilliant!

The only thing I might add for anyone working near water in such cold would be an oversize thin waterproof pair of gloves
when working tripods into positions or removing from or relocating in streams, ponds, ocean etc. Getting your hand protection wet in severe cold is not something you really want to do , especially if a hike out hauling your tripod is in the cards at day's end.

Thank you for thinking of us all...
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2013, 04:40:03 PM »
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Great stuff Scott!!!
+10. Clear, thorough, accurate. Thanks for posting it.
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degrub
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 08:26:33 PM »
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Chrisc -

Singapore is lovely this time of year.......and the next month and the next month  Wink

Frank
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Colorado David
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 08:45:17 PM »
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I haven't read the linked article, but I just spent ten hours outside today in single digits with varying windchill.  I was comfortable.
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NancyP
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« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2013, 01:50:24 PM »
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Here's a tragic example of what can happen if you DON'T take cold-weather precautions seriously:

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/weekend-celebration-turns-into-tragedy-as-millstadt-man-and-boys/article_73257fe4-db4f-5adb-8a32-9114e7669c58.html

Yes, you can die of hypothermia when the temperature is above freezing. You can and will make bad decisions when you are in early to moderate hypothermia - that is likely what happened in the case  above, where the adult turned down an offer of a car ride back to shelter.

Unless you are close to a working car or on a very heavily traveled short trail, you need the "ten essentials" for winter day trips:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Essentials

I consider a "space blanket" plus tarp/cord/stakes, or space-blanket-material bivy, per person an essential as well. Some sort of signalling device is a good idea, and if you are in an area with good phone coverage, a cell phone (fully charged) will do nicely. Keep your battery dependent items close to your skin, with the exception of the headlamp (and carry spares for the headlamp).
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Walt Roycraft
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« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2013, 02:59:46 PM »
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I did this shot last year and forgot my waterproof gear. It was a 6 mile hike there and back. It first started to rain then snow.
I got soaked and was shivering freezing. I don't normally go to McDonalds but the coffee and cheese burger were from heaven that day.
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NancyP
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« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2013, 12:55:10 PM »
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I am considering renting a blind overnight on the Platte River in Nebraska during the crane migration season, and their information sheet says that if the user hasn't done winter camping, they should not use the blind. They also add information about minimal equipment (one -10 F bag or 2 nested 30 F bags, two pads, etc...). Gulp!  I have done 30 F camping, which passes for winter camping where I live, but 0 F camping - nope.
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framah
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« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2013, 08:26:06 AM »
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I think one of the most important items to have  to get warm after a trek into the wilderness is......


HEATED SEATS !!!

Nothing like getting back to the car, getting in, starting it up and feeling the seat warming up your tooshie!!
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NancyP
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« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2013, 03:56:04 PM »
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There's nothing like it when you get back from a baking hot outdoor event, and you drop your tush into .... a malfunctioning heated seat. I had a 1977 Saab 99 which malfunctioned this way, so I plugged in the heater in the winter and unplugged it come spring.
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SnorriGunnarsson
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« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2013, 10:10:20 AM »
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Great read Scott.-

I have 3 "rules" that I never break, when photographing in cold weather.

1. Gloves - unbelievable how cold hands can affect your mood/endurance

2. good hat/took -

3. waterproof shoes/boots - cold feet make me loose all interest

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PDobson
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« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2013, 12:37:13 PM »
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I liked the article. More than enough good technical advice to keep a photographer warm and happy.

I want to add "keep moving!". I can't stand watching people new to ice and alpine climbing standing perfectly still at the belay and complaining about the cold. Even when hanging awkwardly from an anchor I still find a way to at least fidget around. If your hands are cold, do "windmills" by swinging your arms wildly around. This has the benefits of both burning a ton of calories and forcing that warm blood into your extremities.

This obviously uses a lot of calories, so be sure to fuel up. Lots of carbs before and during activity and fats to keep you warm at night. Keep hydrated. You won't want to drink water when it's cold, but you need to. Hot drinks in a thermos make everything more pleasant.

Phillip
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PDobson
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« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2013, 12:48:21 PM »
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Nancy,

Keeping warm when winter camping isn't the hard part; it's all of the technical issues that crop up as a result of the cold. Things stop working properly, it becomes harder to do everything, and liquid water becomes a precious resource.

For example, when camping earlier this month in the Canadian Rockies, we really had to fight for our water. The river was completely solid, so we mined blocks of ice to melt back at camp. Stoves don't work well in the cold, and it took close to three hours to make dinner and melt water for the next day. We kept the precious beer warm in a cooler, but the bottle would freeze solid before we could finish it.

Phillip
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