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Author Topic: How do you transport your gear on location?  (Read 1879 times)
The View
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« on: January 14, 2013, 02:20:15 PM »
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What do you use to transport gear on location?

Here is what I found so far:

1.  Multicarts: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/664498-REG/MultiCart_R12RT_8_in_1_Equipment_Transporters_.html

I have seen one in action and I think it's just for really flat surfaces.

2:  Wesco Mega Mover: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/367966-REG/Wesco_220650_Mega_Mover_Folding_Handtruck.html

Upside: big wheels, downsides: super heavy, and you can only transport boxes, as there's just that flat loading area on the bottom.

3: Here's the Beach Rolly, a cart manufactured in Germany: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/850230-REG/Eckla_55550_Beach_Rolly_Gear_Cart.html

Upside: 10 inch pneumatic wheels give gear a smooth ride, Side walls to keep it stable. Seems to be the only cart that's true all-terrain (including loose beach sand).

Downside: small load surface, enough to put two generators on it. You have to use bungee cords to attach stuff that you put on top of it.
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jrsforums
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2013, 02:45:04 PM »
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http://www.amazon.com/Magna-Cart-Personal-Hand-Truck/dp/B000HVVSDU/ref=pd_cp_hi_0

http://www.amazon.com/Magna-Cart-Ideal-Hand-Truck/dp/B001HBH1BM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1358195737&sr=8-2&keywords=magna+cart

http://www.amazon.com/Magna-Cart-Flatform-Wheeled-Truck/dp/B002TITK8O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1358195737&sr=8-3&keywords=magna+cart

http://welcomproducts.com/2010Vers2/page6/page6.html

All are great.  I have the 'Personal' which amazon does not appear to sell directly.
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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2013, 07:38:52 PM »
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I have to admit that you have piqued my interest. What are you transporting to require such heavy duty equipment?

Like I said, I'm just a curious amateur. I usually consider my 70-200 F4 to be way too heavy to justify.

I have some friends who are professional sound technicians. They usually carry equipment by the provided handle or use a hand truck for big or awkward items.

Phillip
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Steve Weldon
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2013, 08:43:10 PM »
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What do you use to transport gear on location?

Here is what I found so far:

1.  Multicarts: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/664498-REG/MultiCart_R12RT_8_in_1_Equipment_Transporters_.html

I have seen one in action and I think it's just for really flat surfaces.

2:  Wesco Mega Mover: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/367966-REG/Wesco_220650_Mega_Mover_Folding_Handtruck.html

Upside: big wheels, downsides: super heavy, and you can only transport boxes, as there's just that flat loading area on the bottom.



I find I have a variety of  different devices I use.  The  linked hand truck you linked, I think I have the exact same one.  It's incredibly handy, very light (it's an aluminum hand truck), folds handily, smoooth because of the large rubber wheels, and you can carry just about anything with it.  Tilt it back and it will take boxes, bags, and just about anything else, though I'm always mindful to buy "stackable" containers.  I've been abusing mine for about ten years now, and a friend just bought one, same brands, and I'm almost certain you can get one for <1/3 of the price.
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The View
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2013, 09:27:54 PM »
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I find I have a variety of  different devices I use.  The  linked hand truck you linked, I think I have the exact same one.  It's incredibly handy, very light (it's an aluminum hand truck), folds handily, smoooth because of the large rubber wheels, and you can carry just about anything with it.  Tilt it back and it will take boxes, bags, and just about anything else, though I'm always mindful to buy "stackable" containers.  I've been abusing mine for about ten years now, and a friend just bought one, same brands, and I'm almost certain you can get one for <1/3 of the price.

There are different varieties of the Wesco hand truck, one of which costs about $ 99.00, but has too small wheels that can't handle unpaved roads or walkways.

The one I linked to is actually not that light (15 pounds or more). I'm sure the Wesco can carry  more, and it can take crates. The beach rolly is more something you can also access more difficult terrain with - an advantage for those who shoot on location.

I looked around, and the choice will be between the two. And both fold down neatly.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2013, 12:41:35 AM »
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Hi,

Folks have different needs. Personally I carry 2-3 bodies 4-6 lenses plus a tripod in a backpack.

Professional photographers need a lot of stuff. Lighting equipment tripods and stands, reflectors.

Best regards
Erik



I have to admit that you have piqued my interest. What are you transporting to require such heavy duty equipment?

Like I said, I'm just a curious amateur. I usually consider my 70-200 F4 to be way too heavy to justify.

I have some friends who are professional sound technicians. They usually carry equipment by the provided handle or use a hand truck for big or awkward items.

Phillip
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Steve Weldon
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2013, 07:47:33 AM »
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There are different varieties of the Wesco hand truck, one of which costs about $ 99.00, but has too small wheels that can't handle unpaved roads or walkways.

The one I linked to is actually not that light (15 pounds or more). I'm sure the Wesco can carry  more, and it can take crates. The beach rolly is more something you can also access more difficult terrain with - an advantage for those who shoot on location.

I looked around, and the choice will be between the two. And both fold down neatly.
I had a look.. The Wesco's I have are very similar as you mentioned.  Weight was the factor in buying both, I didn't care so much about weight so we got the bigger one like you posted and I personally don't find it heavy.  I found my assistants and wife avoided it so we got this one: http://www.handtrucks.com/hand-trucks/compact-luggage-hand-trucks/wescosuperlitefoldinghandtruck.cfm and we tend to use it all the time  if only one is required, we'll use both if needed.   

I tend to buy over capacity with such things, with Wesco I've learned this isn't necessary.  If it says it will carry 75 pounds. then it will carry 75 pounds (or more) all day long every day..
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2013, 11:53:37 AM »
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To location I mostly usea Honda element. Once on location:  MultiCarts, hands and shoulders.
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Ellis Vener
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PDobson
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2013, 11:26:04 AM »
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Thanks Erik,

Insight into how other photographers operate is really helpful. I think that I would prefer a carry system like yours, with a comfortably-sized backpack containing the essentials and a few extra goodies and backups. I like to be part of the action, so light-and-fast is great for me.

I can see how photographers close to civilization and in tricky lighting conditions would benefit from mountains of lighting equipment. They can rely less on luck and more on good preparation.

Phillip
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The View
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 09:01:51 PM »
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I'm currently leaning towards the Eckla cart - carrying capacity is about 170 pounds, and it has big tires for all-terrain.

Currently planning a good transport system - which includes a system of cases that can be stacked one on top of the other, including the sandbags.

I'll probably have the two generators on the bottom, and then the case with heads and pocketwizards, and the head extension cord tucked behind.

Just found a great brand of cases that look better to me than the Pelican cases, with very adjustable interiors. That's only for the equipment that can actually be transported together. Other parts of the equipment has to be carried on its own, like the Mola Euro or a rolling stand which weighs enough to have Atlas come to help carry it.

So I'm planning to get all equipment to the set in two runs, and have it easily set up and stowed away again.

I've had quite a chaos in the past with too many cases, bags, back packs, loose cables... which always leads to loose cannons...
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rgs
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 09:56:00 PM »
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On the theory that almost anything costs less when it's not "photo" related, I use a multi-cart I bought at Home Depot for about $40 several years ago. I have replaced the larger set of wheels when the originals wore out. Next time I'll buy wheel with pneumatic tires. I use the cart to carry a large plastic crate I have modified to hold my Novatron 4 head light kit, my cameras and tripod, laptop and various photo and sales related things.  It all fits in my trunk.
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KevinA
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2013, 04:52:35 AM »
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What do you use to transport gear on location?

Here is what I found so far:

1.  Multicarts: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/664498-REG/MultiCart_R12RT_8_in_1_Equipment_Transporters_.html

I have seen one in action and I think it's just for really flat surfaces.

2:  Wesco Mega Mover: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/367966-REG/Wesco_220650_Mega_Mover_Folding_Handtruck.html

Upside: big wheels, downsides: super heavy, and you can only transport boxes, as there's just that flat loading area on the bottom.

3: Here's the Beach Rolly, a cart manufactured in Germany: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/850230-REG/Eckla_55550_Beach_Rolly_Gear_Cart.html

Upside: 10 inch pneumatic wheels give gear a smooth ride, Side walls to keep it stable. Seems to be the only cart that's true all-terrain (including loose beach sand).

Downside: small load surface, enough to put two generators on it. You have to use bungee cords to attach stuff that you put on top of it.
I let my Butler worry about that side of things.
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Kevin.
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2013, 10:36:12 AM »
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Sometimes I use a Filmtools Patron Jr Magliner-style converted cart, with sand wheels if needed, though breaking down and transporting the cart is a bit much.
Recently I got a really fantastic cart for locations without a lot of bad terrain, the Inovativ Scout.
For really simple stuff, I use a Fold-It marine utility cart, though I'm thinking of replacing this with the RockNRoller cart or Beach Rolly.

« Last Edit: January 26, 2013, 12:05:25 PM by gss » Logged
MarkL
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2013, 01:21:38 PM »
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I carry mine and have had to be careful what I choose because I'm usually without an assistant and sometimes I have to go on the train/tube. Strobes are in a thinktank slingshot (leaves one shoulder free), camera + lenses in a shoulder bag thinktank retrospective 30, stands and stuff in a kata bag with a shoulder strap. Often I can offload something to one of the team when I meet them.

If I can though, I just stuck most of it in a big roll-along luggage case to avoid paying 'photog tax' on the bag itself.
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