Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: A little story about the importance of awareness when shooting.  (Read 2007 times)
Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1956


Editing Allowed


« on: January 15, 2013, 10:53:08 AM »
ReplyReply

Yesterday, I was out practicing with my 70-200 2.8 with 1.7 converter...trying to get used to the weight, depth of field, etc. I went to a place where I knew there would be lots of ducks, egrets, herons, etc. It is a simple "park" pond encompassing about 4 acres. Surrounding the pond are several floating platforms with attached, hinged walkways. I was quite engaged is shooting several overly enamored ducks having a go at anything with feathers, and several others doing some rather vigorous bathing rituals...and I shot for about ten minutes.

When I turned to leave, something caught my eye on the exit walk that turned out to be three water moccasins of various sizes, the largest about 2 1/2 feet and probably as thick as my monopod. It was either a trip into the water - and that wasn't happening, or ..whaooo, a cell phone to call the police who in turn called the animal shelter who coincidently were housed in the park area. They sent over a snake wrangler who managed to trap the biggest guy but lost the other two. They take them to Ocala to be milked for anti-venom.

A. Always have your cell phone with you.
B. Take a gander around you when shooting. Those guys could have just as easily slithered over to where I was standing as look at me and moccasins are very aggressive and territorial.
C. Take an extra pair of drawers with you if you get caught like I did...I didn't but I was close...I've seen what a moccasin can do to human flesh and it isn't at all pretty.

Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
Dave (Isle of Skye)
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1008


Don't mistake lack of talent for genius.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2013, 03:51:59 PM »
ReplyReply

The most dangerous thing we have to look out for in the UK is stinging nettles  Grin

Dave
Logged

Photography Tuition holidays on the Misty Isle of Skye
http://www.photography.info
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2013, 05:13:08 PM »
ReplyReply

The most dangerous thing we have to look out for in the UK is stinging nettles  Grin

Dave


You forget the common Scottish viper: the adder. Keep away from ferns, rotting branches on the ground. Or have your new neighbours decided not to warn you?

Subtle, them islanders!

;-)

Rob C
Logged

Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1956


Editing Allowed


« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2013, 05:46:57 PM »
ReplyReply

Just around my house we have the Rattlesnake (Eastern Diamondback) which can grow to 8-10+ feet and as big around as your arm, the Pigmy Rattler, maybe a foot long and as round as your big toe but has the same potentcy of the 10 foot cousin; the Coral snake..red and black, friend to Jack, red and yellow kill a fellow identification markings, about the same size as the pigmy but they have to gnaw on you for a few to inject the venom - quite deadly; the Copperhead - ooh, blends in so nicely with fall leaves that you're more likely to step on him before you know he's there; and the Water Moccasin which can get up to five feet plus and is very deadly because it is territorial and aggressive. I've seen them chase people all the way up to their car.

I push a little wheeled stick in front of me when I'm in the deep woods just to let the slithery beasties know I'm there and give them ample room to slip away.

Oh-oh and we are just starting to get the pythons and boa constrictors up our way...lovely.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
degrub
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273


« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2013, 10:09:54 PM »
ReplyReply

LOL. That reminds of the time a cottonmouth dropped in our john boat from  a tree branch. i thought my buddy was going to walk on water trying to get away. Cheesy
Frank
Logged
Fips
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 195



WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 02:59:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
The most dangerous thing we have to look out for in the UK is stinging nettles  Grin

I was thinking exactly the same. Reminds me of a summer during my studies when we had some Aussie exchange students. We were playing frisbee and at some point that thing flew off into some bushes. Half of the Australians were too afraid to step into the bushes, the other half knew that there are no poisonous critters in Germany but they had never heard of stinging-nettles. Poor chaps were scratching their legs for the next two days  Grin 
Logged
opgr
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1125


WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2013, 05:16:49 AM »
ReplyReply

but they had never heard of stinging-nettles. Poor chaps were scratching their legs for the next two days  Grin 

Vinigar FTW...
Logged

Regards,
Oscar Rysdyk
theimagingfactory
Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1956


Editing Allowed


« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2013, 08:26:34 AM »
ReplyReply

We had those in CA but I've never heard of them here. I've had my fair share of the nettle boogies.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
Riaan van Wyk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 682



WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2013, 02:05:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Chris, you forgot to mention the most dangerous thing of all- people.
Logged
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2635


« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2013, 03:25:49 AM »
ReplyReply

The most dangerous thing we have to look out for in the UK is stinging nettles  Grin

Dave

What about the midges?
Logged

Dave (Isle of Skye)
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1008


Don't mistake lack of talent for genius.


WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2013, 04:53:43 AM »
ReplyReply

What about the midges?

Yes you are right, at the height of the summer on a warm and windless day, it can become a bit like midgiegeddon around here, especially at the tourist hotspots, they know where we like to stand and gawp at the scenery it seems. Easy trick I have found though, is shoot near the coast (and being on an island that is never far away), as they cannot fly in anything more than a slight on-shore breeze, or simply keep moving, as again they cannot catch you if you are moving. Although I have found even in the height of summer on a still day, I can still do plenty of photography, I can get out of the car, set up a shot, fire off a few quick frames and then jump back into the car before they realise I am there and start to gang up on me.


You forget the common Scottish viper: the adder. Keep away from ferns, rotting branches on the ground. Or have your new neighbours decided not to warn you?

Subtle, them islanders!

;-)

Rob C

Yes we do indeed get adders and they are quite common I am told, but I have never yet seen one, although we have seen a few slow worms - thanks for reminding me  Smiley
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 04:58:34 AM by Dave (Isle of Skye) » Logged

Photography Tuition holidays on the Misty Isle of Skye
http://www.photography.info
RSL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6201



WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2013, 12:32:33 PM »
ReplyReply

We need to see if we can get St. Paddy to visit Florida for a while.
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2013, 01:47:53 PM »
ReplyReply

We need to see if we can get St. Paddy to visit Florida for a while.



I don't think he'd risk Scotland today: one half would try to kiss him and the other to kill him. Were I a saint, I certainly wouldn't want to risk it! Let 'em keep their pesky adder! Can't speak for Florida at large, but there used to be notices at the edges of some hotel grounds advising to keep away from piles of debris of any sort. He might find that interesting, but it was all I needed, as you can imagine.

Rob C
Logged

NancyP
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 816


« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2013, 01:18:18 PM »
ReplyReply

Our rattlers are all sleeping in their limestone bluff "cavelets". Harmless unless you stick your hand into the hole or crevice to the nest, and even then, it has to be a warm-ish day. They will start waking up and migrating to the river in April.
Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2013, 04:37:04 PM »
ReplyReply

This evening, I watched part of a film about the largest prehistoric snake; was based on the python type, made 48ft long, and eat enormous versions of the then current gigantic croc. They say.

They also said that a shipment of Burmese pythons escaped in Florida during a storm some years ago, and there are now thousands of them in the Everglades, pythons, not storms, though I guess there are plenty of those, too. It certainly gave raining lessons in Hollywood.

It's funny: when I was around eight, we moved to India for some years, and I used to run around the rocks and wasteland behind our house, armed with a catapult. (I was quite good with it.) Never saw a snake though cobras were around: there would be skins up on our upper terraces, brought along by passing birds, I hope. There were really large black scorpions, often on the insides of the window ledges, and I'd estimate them to be about six or seven inches long or so; they didn't bug me either. But then, after we returned to Britain, I discovered that I had a new dread of such things. Thank goodness I didn't suffer from it when younger. It totally destroyed any pleasure I might otherwise have had, many years later, from shooting in Africa. A nightmare.

People.

Rob C
Logged

Chris Calohan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1956


Editing Allowed


« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2013, 10:52:38 PM »
ReplyReply

I forgot to mention we also have scorpions, brown recluses, black widows, alligators, sting rays, sharks and the occasional barracuda. I only think Australia and Africa have more naughty critters than us.
Logged

What! Me Worry?

Life is about a little kid driving a Mini...
tom b
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 869


WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2013, 11:21:57 PM »
ReplyReply

Spotted this guy a couple of weeks ago just before I nearly stepped on it.



It's a red bellied black snake, highly poisonous but they are not aggressive and they don't inject much venom.

Cheers,
Logged

Tony Jay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2090


« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2013, 03:40:41 AM »
ReplyReply

Spotted this guy a couple of weeks ago just before I nearly stepped on it.



It's a red bellied black snake, highly poisonous but they are not aggressive and they don't inject much venom.

Those guys still have fatalities recorded against them though.
I have portraits of red-bellied blacks - shot with a 70-200 f2.8 though!

Tony Jay
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 04:24:24 AM by Tony Jay » Logged
jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2013, 01:26:38 AM »
ReplyReply

Exquisite snakes Tony. I've seen half a dozen in the past 3 days since the overcast weather... frogs about and they LOVE them!

Julie
Logged

jjj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3365



WWW
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2013, 07:24:49 PM »
ReplyReply

The most dangerous thing we have to look out for in the UK is stinging nettles  Grin

Dave
I took a Canadian out mountain biking here in UK and whilst at home he had bears and other critters to worry about, he was a bit taken aback by our vicious vegetation. On that ride alone IIRC, I counted about 20 types of unfriendly vegetation after he expressed surprise when I mention beware of stingies. Brambles, stingies, hawthorn, gorse, giant hogweed, thistles..... I forget the rest off hand as I'm a bit rubbish with plant names. But until then I hadn't really twigged just how many kinds of skin damaging plants there, you simply avoided them as a matter of course.
Logged

Tradition is the Backbone of the Spineless.   Futt Futt Futt Photography
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad