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Author Topic: Aerial landscape photography tips?  (Read 5097 times)
adamstuffy
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« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2013, 07:01:55 AM »
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The term Aerial Landscape photography which becomes very vast and cover more various types of work like real estate photography,environmental problems or issues,etc.Also it is one of the most challenging kind of stuff for the photographers.Aerial photography from flights and helicopter may be an easiest because pilot may give some permission or area to shoot the photos to the aerial photographer.


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Deardorff
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« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2013, 10:05:44 PM »
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At the very least, Double tie in with two separate harnesses. Three is better and sure makes for more confidence when the plane hits a wind shear area.

Also, tie in the camera with a good cable or sling to the tripod socket. Once the plane hits some rough spots and you lose footing or are thrown around abit and hit your elbow - you don't want to see the camera falling out of the plane.

Have a pilot who is NOT out to impress you with his aerobatics.
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Colorado David
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« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2013, 11:47:45 PM »
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I just saw this topic.  The Cessna Turbo 210 is the best choice.  It has the fully cantilevered wing and retractible landing gear.  I have a mountaineering harness that I use when flying with the door off.  There are two things to consider as far as harnesses; when you need to stay in the plane, you need a harness that will keep you in, but if you have an emergency and need to get out of the plane, you have to be able to do it quickly.  Another good choice, but more expensive would be Cessna 208 Caravan set up for skydiving.  The Caravan is a turbine engine aircraft and doesn't have the vibration of a piston engine.  I most heartily recommend ear protection.  Ask me how I know, but speak up when you do.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2013, 08:14:08 PM »
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  I most heartily recommend ear protection.  Ask me how I know, but speak up when you do.

Heh. Too true.  I have a 4 kHz notch in my otherwise-excellent hearing from helicopter noise.

Usually, intercom systems offer some degree of noise protection.  Duration is the issue.  Long-term exposure will hit you, regardless of the efficiency your noise protection hardware.
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John Camp
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« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2013, 11:38:47 PM »
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A question about haze. Why does a shorter lens show less haze effect than a longer one, if they're both shooting through the same amount of haze? That is, if you're a half-mile from a mountain range, why does it make any difference was lens length you use when shooting the mountains? I need to know because I'm planning a flight up the Sangre De Christos between Santa Fe and Taos -- I want to stay a half mile or so away from the mountains, but generally below their tops, and still get fairly tight pictures. I was thinking of ~400mm on a Nikon D800 and a 200-600 equivalent on a m43. The flight would be by helicopter.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #25 on: November 03, 2013, 09:37:29 AM »
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That is a very long lens for aerials.  I've never used anything near that length.  Usual lens on film cameras was a 25-250, but I never used it at 250.

Haze is problem for long lenses because you're magnifying it.  A wide lens sees the same haze in the shot, but it's much smaller in the frame.  Haze is lessened during the early morning hours.  Arrive at the location soon after dawn.

Half a mile from the mountains is a long way if the mountains are your subject. My usual instructions to the pilot are "get as close to the subject as you feel safe"
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Colorado David
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« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2013, 03:13:18 PM »
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Most of my aerial shooting has been pretty nearly full wide with the subject (another airplane) about three feet away.  I think that counts as as close as possible.  Shooting telephoto from an aircraft magnifies every bump and jiggle and no matter how smooth the air, there are always bumps and jiggles.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2013, 09:02:30 PM »
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Most of my aerial shooting has been pretty nearly full wide with the subject (another airplane) about three feet away.  I think that counts as as close as possible. 

That definitely counts as "as close as possible" : )  Dunno about "as close as you feel safe", though.  I've shot air to air with the Canadian Snowbirds.  I know just what you mean by close.
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