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Author Topic: Shooting Digital MF in Wedding Photography  (Read 7889 times)
KLaban
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« Reply #40 on: January 17, 2013, 04:22:17 AM »
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And what makes BC different than some other folks here is that he USES the tools and he's not scared of stretching their envelopes even when there's a big cheque on the table.

Agreed. It doesn't get better than reading interesting and informed posts illustrated with beautiful imagery by photographers who have a wealth of experience using their chosen equipment.

There is a HUGE difference between that and buying some used kit on the Bay, fuffing about with it for 7 weeks, 700 frames (and raving about it) and selling it on for a profit.

...and then pissing on the whole experience.


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MrSmith
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« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2013, 05:15:36 AM »
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"We worked so fast the assistants are holding the lights because we didn't have time to set up stands and two grip trucks were in the background"

Your productions are often like that (from what I glean from your wonderful imagery and posts) but how do you operate when it's just you and whatever you can fit into that shoulder bag that you have to carry around all day from morning until night? Not every photographer has a grip truck and minions running around after them and the budget to allow that.

I see a lot of sense in both FBG's posts and those of the vested interests of the dealers/reps but any decent photographer follows the mantra of Ron Dennis of McLaren F1 fame
"use the right equipment, and use it the right way"

Cost can also have a bearing on that, be it the cost of time, job budget or the acceptable cost of equipment offset against profits of the business.

The idea of weddings breaks me out in a cold sweat, mainly for the horror of dealing with the expectations of a visually unaware public and my precious summer weekends not belonging to me.
But I know what tool I would reach for if I had to shoot from morning to evening in rapidly changing light/environments.
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rjkern
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« Reply #42 on: January 17, 2013, 10:59:11 AM »
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+1

And what makes BC different than some other folks here is that he USES the tools and he's not scared of stretching their envelopes even when there's a big cheque on the table.

He's owned and used those two poor P+ backs and Contaxes forever and has shot a gazillion frames with them in all sorts of conditions and on REAL jobs. I don't know anyone else who uses an M8 commercially and very few shoot stills with a RED successfully

There is a HUGE difference between that and buying some used kit on the Bay, fuffing about with it for 7 weeks, 700 frames (and raving about it) and selling it on for a profit.

That is also why I liked RJ's article: He's got a toolbox which he's happy with, he appreciates the virtues of using the 2 different formats and he knows their limitations. It also seems like his clients are happy with the service he provides!

Whoever tells him that he is wrong is a fool IMO...

Yair

Thanks, Yair! You make perfect points!
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R. J. Kern
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Ed Foster, Jr.
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« Reply #43 on: January 17, 2013, 12:30:27 PM »
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RJ,

You have some excellent work on your site. Keep on making images "YOUR WAY" and keep on having fun!

Ed
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Ed Foster, Jr.
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« Reply #44 on: January 17, 2013, 03:32:42 PM »
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Your productions are often like that (from what I glean from your wonderful imagery and posts) but how do you operate when it's just you and whatever you can fit into that shoulder bag that you have to carry around all day from morning until night? Not every photographer has a grip truck and minions running around after them and the budget to allow that.



I can't count the number of times I've gone to the beach and had the talent dress behind a long piece of canvas we hold up to shield her/him/both.

Editorial, Personal work, some budget restricted work we do small crew. 

Not just me and a camera, but me, 1 assistant, my producer that does makeup and one hair artist.

That is some of the best work we do,I don't shoot a million files and I don't have twenty people giving out opinions.  That's the way this type of work goes.



If commerced worked this way, that's fine by me, but it usually doesn't.

I also don't believe in false economy.  If your working in commerce and your working fast and detailed, it does the photographer no good to be digging around in a case looking for a lense or changing cf cards while the world passes by.

If you don't have the people that can fix a collar, or add a big ass white card for fill, then your probably going to miss something. 

You also don't get anywhere by getting a cheap assistant, beating the heck out of him/her  making him/her do the job of 4 people and then expect great results.

The photographer that makes it is the one that offers more.  Period.

____________________

This camera talk is silly.  Anybody can use what they want, but if anyone thinks that they can show up with a cell phone, flip flops, a smile and make big money, either they got the gig from their Uncle at Publicis, or they live off a trust fund.

These are tough times and clients are demanding.  You either work harder, offer more or you don't exist.  You better know this biz top to bottom, work professionally, run servers, be there for your clients, produce perfectly, don't underpay, don't overpay and do it with a semi smile.

Sure they're some cheap cats out there that will do it for less, but that's always been the case, they're always has been somebody cheaper but the way you separate yourself from the commodity brigade is do it better, do it right, do it with no excuses.

Cheap cats have problems.  They don't carry insurance, they don't have the proper equipment, or they spend days borrowing, they don't have a reputation with their suppliers that will save them if the job goes sideways because of weather, they don't deliver day and night, they' usually have an excuse.

I have clients that go to cheap cats and they usually come back.

Last year we had the budget pulled out of a gig and I had to pare down crew.  I carried as much stuff as anyone, and we worked day and night, no overtime, no complaints, no problems, other than we were beat down tired.  Then again, the client came back with more money on the next gig, so life goes on.
____________________

I got a ton of cameras and use them all.  I don't care what camera anyone uses.  That BS to think that my way is the only way.

Still and I'm serious about this.

I tire of the constant beat down of one format, specifically one brand because somebody's got a H**d on.

I tire of the scream about good dealers that aren't getting rich and work damn hard for every client they have.  They serve a purpose and I'm not going to try to explain it to anyone who doesn't understand why they're needed.

I also tire of the whoa is me, the world's coming to the end talk so let's all shoot with a cell phone and instigram it or hey I got it, I'll buy cheap plastic cameras and shoot film that looks like instigram.

If you want to be a facebook photographer then fine, but I don't get it.

If it works for them fine, but personally I think it's a gimmick.

IMO

BC
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FredBGG
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« Reply #45 on: January 17, 2013, 04:14:57 PM »
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RJ,

You have some excellent work on your site. Keep on making images "YOUR WAY" and keep on having fun!

Ed


+1

RJ does his thing nicely. HE also did invite discussion:

My thoughts on the matter, share on el blogito ::

http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/shooting-digital-medium-format-in-wedding-photography-2

I share 11 technical advantages of digital medium format vs 35mm DSLR cameras.

Love to hear your thoughts!


Cheers,

R. J.



It's interesting how the MF vendors and company reps want to paint my response as a stupid attack on RJ's way of doing things.

It is not at all. Actually I particularly like his portrait of his brother..... reminds me a bit of one of my favorites a portrait I shot
for Bill Heider Saturday Night Live.


I love to play with eyebrow prowess.

... some more eybrow fun and games:

Pink


Robert Pattinson


The amazing Dei Antword

RJ's brother certainly has eyebrow prowess of the A-list Smiley

While I discussed my thoughts on the article (some backed up by other posters here, including a wedding photographer that
owns both MF and a 35mm DSLR) RJ is doing his thing and well, I think that the most important point he makes is that the DF with leaf shutter lens is nice and simple to use with flash used to kill sunlight.

The main advantage being that he can use small flash without loss of power and with slightly easier exposure determination that
doing the same thing with a 35mm DSLR and strobes.

However there are still some technical aspects of using 1/1600th sync with an LS lens that need to be considered.
You need to have a flash that has a short duration in order to not lose power. There are many strobes out there that
have longer duration, but plenty with short durations too.

What this means for RJ's shooting is that by using flash power efficiently he is getting good flash recycle times
and all the flash power is contributing to his exposure. A reading from a hand held flash meter capable of combining flash and daylight will give him
an accurate reading without compensation for flash power loss.

That said the same thing can be achieved using more flash power and a strobe that has a long enough flash duration
to work with Canon or Nikons FP flash mode.

There are also new strobes coming out that support both Nikon and Canons high speed flash mode that their speed lights use.





Quote from HCam.de
Quote
The featurelist is impressive, The flash power with HSS mode is 50% as high as with normal Mode 1 setting, the powerconsumption is only marginally higher.

The new HSS8000 has HSS support and uses some fancy electronics to avoid losing much power even at sync speeds of up to 1/8000th

BH will also be selling this under their own brand too.

I think we will see similar offerings from other vendors too.

Adding HSS support to Strobes is a very interesting move. More efficient than using classic slower duration strobes to cover the full shutter
swipe over the sensor.

Doing what can be done with Phase Ones leaf shutters with a 35mm DSLR will be one step simpler with these HSS strobes.

What these HSS strobes are doing is acting as high power out put HMI movie lights, but for very short durations. About 1/250th of a second.
Long enough for the Nikon or Canon shutter to complete the focal plane shutter speeds of over 1/500th to 1/8000th.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 04:38:31 PM by FredBGG » Logged
MrSmith
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« Reply #46 on: January 17, 2013, 04:33:50 PM »
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"Not just me and a camera"
So not really a comparison to how a lot of wedding photographers work, and you are right that to produce your images you wouldn't want to compromise on anything (be it decent lunch or a bit of kit) that affects the quality of your shoot.

This was shot in a restaurant of a sound studio building because there wasn't enough room in the studio itself, it had black walls and was very dimly lit, just the light of the battery powered elinchrom. Tiny crew, no time (20mins) and constantly changing situation. I shot an ex presidents wife and the man that owns half the worlds advertising/media industry plus a few other notables for this campaign. Would have loved to shoot MF but it's too slow, too inflexible. Would have been fine in a proper studio with a half day on each shot but that was never going to happen. The client was very happy, they wouldn't have been any more or less happy whatever i had shot on but the logistics meant that I wouldn't take a p45
5dIII 100mm macro elinchrom ranger quadra lighting
(not got the original finals so this from a media news website, talent is Labrinth a musician/producer who today's youth know about  Roll Eyes  )
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MrSmith
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« Reply #47 on: January 17, 2013, 04:57:07 PM »
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Those HSS strobes look interesting, wonder if they will make it to the u.k?
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FredBGG
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« Reply #48 on: January 17, 2013, 05:06:45 PM »
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"Not just me and a camera"
So not really a comparison to how a lot of wedding photographers work, and you are right that to produce your images you wouldn't want to compromise on anything (be it decent lunch or a bit of kit) that affects the quality of your shoot.

This was shot in a restaurant of a sound studio building because there wasn't enough room in the studio itself, it had black walls and was very dimly lit, just the light of the battery powered elinchrom. Tiny crew, no time (20mins) and constantly changing situation. I shot an ex presidents wife and the man that owns half the worlds advertising/media industry plus a few other notables for this campaign. Would have loved to shoot MF but it's too slow, too inflexible. Would have been fine in a proper studio with a half day on each shot but that was never going to happen. The client was very happy, they wouldn't have been any more or less happy whatever i had shot on but the logistics meant that I wouldn't take a p45
5dIII 100mm macro elinchrom ranger quadra lighting
(not got the original finals so this from a media news website, talent is Labrinth a musician/producer who today's youth know about  Roll Eyes  )


Hey ... the not so young ones know him too. He is brilliant and he makes great use of visuals.
It must have been a treat to work with him. Great shot... I like the way you "shot his thoughts more than his appearance"

http://youtu.be/bqIxCtEveG8
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FredBGG
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« Reply #49 on: January 17, 2013, 05:20:20 PM »
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Those HSS strobes look interesting, wonder if they will make it to the u.k?

They are sold under a few brand names in different regions. I think they are Conomark in the UK.

http://www.lightingrumours.com/cononmark-leopard-location-flash-offers-high-speed-sync-2633

The guy that wrote this may be able to point you in the right direction
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FredBGG
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« Reply #50 on: January 17, 2013, 07:09:44 PM »
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Here is an interesting video from Profoto of wedding photographer Tom Munoz
using strobe to overpower the sun with a small Acute and a Canon.

http://youtu.be/ChtksHUpSus
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bcooter
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« Reply #51 on: January 18, 2013, 03:04:36 AM »
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Since this thread has moved to lighting I agree about the Quantum.

Have owned one version or the other forever.  For their size and costs their amazing little strobes.

We just shot a lifestyle project and one of the days was in the Santa Monica park on Ocean at Montana.  It was a week of rain and the day we shot the park scenes is was almost black out.

We mounted an Quantum on a long air stand and the assistant ran behind the talent about 30 degrees behind and the the thing looked like daylight.  Honestly, it was amazing how much it kicked out and we kicked light back with white boards and it saved the shot.  (I'd show the images but their under embargo).

I originally bought a quantum for a studio light and if you really want an interesting look, use a quantum with no diffusion with an assistant holding the head on a stand somewhere close to the lens, maybe above maybe off axis.  Direct the assistant to follow the talent.  It's a beautiful light. 

I don't use small speedlights much, but did on this shot and the prop lights are the lighting source.  When I though this up and never thought it would work without a supplemental key, but a few power corrections and I think we hit this on the fifth or sixth frame.

(Top image p30+ 55mm)  (Bottom Image 1ds2, 85 1.Cool  Same model.


The bottom image was lit with a shiny board bouncing the sunlight back through a silk.

This is a great trick and you can mount the board and silk on stands and it's almost like a secondary key, or in this case a fill.

BTW:  Mr. Smith, love the portrait of Labrinth.  Great texture, great light, great expression.

IMO

BC
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MrSmith
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« Reply #52 on: January 18, 2013, 04:19:59 AM »
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Not used a quantum for a long time but I'm impressed with the elinchrom ranger quadras now they have a lithium battery, wish the led modelling bulb was higher power so you could use them for filming
Your comment is appreciated BC / FBGG, I have a great out-take portrait of Martin Sorell but can't show that yet.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2013, 01:05:32 PM by MrSmith » Logged
bcooter
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« Reply #53 on: January 18, 2013, 11:54:37 AM »
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Haven't used a ranger, but from the same shoot, profoto B2


IMO

BC
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FredBGG
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« Reply #54 on: January 18, 2013, 12:24:31 PM »
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Haven't used a ranger, but from the same shoot, profoto B2


IMO

BC

Is that Port Hueneme in Oxnard?
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bcooter
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« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2013, 12:52:47 PM »
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Is that Port Hueneme in Oxnard?

No it's Will Rogers.

We shoot there every month at minimum, because it's close to our studio and projects are time compressed.  Also WR is easier to permit if you have badges and an account with Film LA.

We use to work Port Hueneme on longer projects, but it's expensive and consuming because legally you need a Ranger which adds to the cost and complexity as depending on the Park Ranger there are a lot of areas they won't let you work on.

Personally I like Zuma, but it also is more expensive than WR and takes another 30/45 minutes to get there.

WR is easy, the only issue is it's booked in advance by a lot of production companies.

IMO

BC
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FredBGG
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« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2013, 03:05:20 PM »
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Another good spot is 5th street just north of Oxnard. There are dunes with reed type grass. Rather unusual for Socal.
A bit far though. A little furthur up there is Emma Wood where there is a very nice dense and resilient ice plant, railway and nice natural river rock areas.
Emma Wood also has a nice park area for setup etc.

Also you might like this website for Arial views of the whole of the California Coastline.

Great as a starting point for location scouting:

http://www.californiacoastline.org/

Regarding Port Hueneme... just a heads up that there is a very nasty superfund toxic site about 1/2 or a mile or there abouts south of the Pier.
There is also a pretty looking lagoon there and wild looking dunes and drift wood..... one would not think it's so badly contaminated.



 
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erstwhile
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« Reply #57 on: January 18, 2013, 11:15:05 PM »
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Love to hear your thoughts!

You asked for it.

1. Savor the ‘look.’
Lots of people say their system has a special look that can't be described. Right. They can't objectively quantify it, but somehow there's a "duende" that makes it special. That "soul" is called the "placebo effect". Take a double blind test between systems X and Y, say 50 samples of image pairs from either (X,X), (X,Y), or (Y,Y): how many folks can actually get a statistically significant accurate rate of distinction? I'm talking current sensor tech, not an IQ180 vs some 10-year-older 6mp 35mm sensor. With the exif stripped out, of course.

2. Use 1/1600 flash sync
Really? First of all, just to be pedantic, faster sync speed doesn't make your lights "like 4 times powerful". It lets you drop ambient, sure. But it's also very easy to drop ambient by a 2 or 3 stops (hell even with speedlights) with bog-standard 1/200. More realistically, how often do you shoot outdoor weddings in high noon where the bride wants the ceremony photos to look like they took place at night on a new moon?

3. Thinking long-term with an open-source system
This has NOTHING TO DO WITH WEDDINGS. So how is it an advantage for wedding photography???

4. Edit with 16 bit depth per color channel
Yeah, except that 2 of those bits are, you know, under the noise floor.

5. Relish the shooting experience
That's fine for you. Does it matter to the bride what your shutter sounds like? Maybe it does. What happens when she says "your shutter sounds so puny compared to a pentax67"? Or "why is that camera so small compared to the 8x10 our other photographer used"?

6. Dig the aspect ratio
Except 4/3 aspect ratio is not unique to medium format.

7. Touch the screen, please
Hey, if you're able to determine that you generate more business because you're able to impress clients by scrolling through photos using gestures rather than pushing a button (which is objectively a FASTER action),more power to you.

8. Embrace smarter technology
Except focus peaking doesn't work in the 4fps "live view" for IQ backs. And if you're not applying focus peaking to 100% magnified playback, it's not really "critical" focus now is it. What's the point of 80MP when focus peaking is only calculated at lower resolution?

9. Don’t forget old school lenses
Not only does this have NOTHING TO DO WITH WEDDINGS, but pretty much EVERY digital system can use "old school lenses", especially Medium format ones. So how is this an advantage of MFDB for wedding photography???

10. Shallow Depth of Field
No, there's NOT a ton of math. It's bad enough that authors like to beat readers with the math stick in peer reviewed white papers. It's just silly for someone to try and pretend to beat the reader with math skills he doesn't even have. Also, you're wrong. You will easily get shallower DOF on 35mm than you can on 2.8 MF lenses for equivalent FOV.

11. Optimal ISO
What are you even talking about? Dropping the ISO drops the strobe too. It doesn't give your strobe more power. It doesn't give your strobe more power relative to ambient. It just drops EVERYTHING by a stop. Also, now you're saying that the advantage of a MFDB over a DSLR is that the MFDB can shoot in hardware binning mode so that the files can be small...(like a DSLR)...? Huh? Might need to work on your logic.


Your port is nice. However, one thing that was conspicuous was that you are mainly a posed portrait shooter. I don't recall noticing any candids (prep, ceremony, reception, etc). Those are MAJOR parts of shooting weddings, and are domains in which DSLRs (with ISO, AF, and frame rate advantages) thoroughly trounce MFDBs.

Also, here is the google cached version of the OP's article. Just a personal peeve about folks drumming up site traffic using articles containing limited content.
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?hl=en&tbo=d&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=cache:PQ4zU-5mJbMJ:http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/shooting-digital-medium-format-in-wedding-photography-2/%2Bhttp://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/shooting-digital-medium-format-in-wedding-photography-2/&gbv=1&sei=HCj6UIjGFKrKiALJr4GIAQ&ct=clnk
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #58 on: January 19, 2013, 12:13:40 AM »
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Hi,

My guess that anyone can work with the equipment they happen to comfortable with. The question if the larger format gives commercial benefits is really one between the client and the photographer.

Now, if you try to describe your subject perception in objective terms the result can be a bit contrieved.

Some points:

1) Usually a silent shutter is preferable to a loud one, I find it odd that that someone prefers a noisy shutter.

2) Regarding the advantage of leaf shutters I would essentially agree with the original poster. Fast sync is an advantage of leaf shutters. It seems that short exposure times are possible on FP shutters with certain units, but I cannot see that usage would not limit guide number. Personally, I find this tendency to "overpower sun" just ugly, but that is a personal preference, if it sells, just fine. Some of the examples "Bcooter" has posted really show expert usage of outdoor flash.

Bcooter:



3) The talk about editing 16 bit files is just stupid. Whenever I open a raw image I work with 16 bit files. Neither Lightroom nor Photoshop has 10, 12 or 14 bit files. Once you open a raw image it will be a 16-bit (or rather 15-bit) file, unless forced into 8 bits.

4) I am not convinced of the utility of peaking. I have peaking on my Sony Alphas and I got peaking well outside what I would call good focus. I also checked focus mask in Capture One, and older version and I wouldn't say it detected exact focus. As I don't have tested Phase One IQ backs I cannot say, but I'm somewhat skeptical.

5) Regarding shallow depth, I think there is something to it. But, that is not really about MF but about focal length and aperture. If you need a relative wide angle of view you can shoot with a say 80 mm lens on MF and use f/2.8. On 135 you would probably need a 50 mm lens at f/2 and many of those lenses have a lot longitudinal chromatic aberration (magenta/green edges). But for really shallow focus you would shoot a 300/2.8 at full aperture, those lenses are sharp. But, I guess the 300/2.8 is not a wedding lens?

6) Regarding old school lenses, I would suggest that mirrorless cameras are most flexible in that area, but you can put most MF lenses on any DSLR. I have a tilt adapter for my Alpha that I can use with Hasselblad lenses, another one for old Pentacon/Kiev lenses and I have an adapter for Pentax 67 lenses stuck in customs. The sample picture in the original posting has the poorest bokeh I have seen this side of a mirror lens.

An observation is that author compares a Nikon D700 with an IQ 140. The D700 is essentially a low resolution semipro camera oriented at high ISO, while the IQ 140 is a pro camera oriented at low ISO. Comparing MFD with Nikon D600/D800 or Sony Alpha 99 would be much more relevant.

Best regards
Erik



You asked for it.

1. Savor the ‘look.’
Lots of people say their system has a special look that can't be described. Right. They can't objectively quantify it, but somehow there's a "duende" that makes it special. That "soul" is called the "placebo effect". Take a double blind test between systems X and Y, say 50 samples of image pairs from either (X,X), (X,Y), or (Y,Y): how many folks can actually get a statistically significant accurate rate of distinction? I'm talking current sensor tech, not an IQ180 vs some 10-year-older 6mp 35mm sensor. With the exif stripped out, of course.

2. Use 1/1600 flash sync
Really? First of all, just to be pedantic, faster sync speed doesn't make your lights "like 4 times powerful". It lets you drop ambient, sure. But it's also very easy to drop ambient by a 2 or 3 stops (hell even with speedlights) with bog-standard 1/200. More realistically, how often do you shoot outdoor weddings in high noon where the bride wants the ceremony photos to look like they took place at night on a new moon?

3. Thinking long-term with an open-source system
This has NOTHING TO DO WITH WEDDINGS. So how is it an advantage for wedding photography???

4. Edit with 16 bit depth per color channel
Yeah, except that 2 of those bits are, you know, under the noise floor.

5. Relish the shooting experience
That's fine for you. Does it matter to the bride what your shutter sounds like? Maybe it does. What happens when she says "your shutter sounds so puny compared to a pentax67"? Or "why is that camera so small compared to the 8x10 our other photographer used"?

6. Dig the aspect ratio
Except 4/3 aspect ratio is not unique to medium format.

7. Touch the screen, please
Hey, if you're able to determine that you generate more business because you're able to impress clients by scrolling through photos using gestures rather than pushing a button (which is objectively a FASTER action),more power to you.

8. Embrace smarter technology
Except focus peaking doesn't work in the 4fps "live view" for IQ backs. And if you're not applying focus peaking to 100% magnified playback, it's not really "critical" focus now is it. What's the point of 80MP when focus peaking is only calculated at lower resolution?

9. Don’t forget old school lenses
Not only does this have NOTHING TO DO WITH WEDDINGS, but pretty much EVERY digital system can use "old school lenses", especially Medium format ones. So how is this an advantage of MFDB for wedding photography???

10. Shallow Depth of Field
No, there's NOT a ton of math. It's bad enough that authors like to beat readers with the math stick in peer reviewed white papers. It's just silly for someone to try and pretend to beat the reader with math skills he doesn't even have. Also, you're wrong. You will easily get shallower DOF on 35mm than you can on 2.8 MF lenses for equivalent FOV.

11. Optimal ISO
What are you even talking about? Dropping the ISO drops the strobe too. It doesn't give your strobe more power. It doesn't give your strobe more power relative to ambient. It just drops EVERYTHING by a stop. Also, now you're saying that the advantage of a MFDB over a DSLR is that the MFDB can shoot in hardware binning mode so that the files can be small...(like a DSLR)...? Huh? Might need to work on your logic.


Your port is nice. However, one thing that was conspicuous was that you are mainly a posed portrait shooter. I don't recall noticing any candids (prep, ceremony, reception, etc). Those are MAJOR parts of shooting weddings, and are domains in which DSLRs (with ISO, AF, and frame rate advantages) thoroughly trounce MFDBs.

Also, here is the google cached version of the OP's article. Just a personal peeve about folks drumming up site traffic using articles containing limited content.
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?hl=en&tbo=d&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=cache:PQ4zU-5mJbMJ:http://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/shooting-digital-medium-format-in-wedding-photography-2/%2Bhttp://www.kern-photo.com/2013/01/shooting-digital-medium-format-in-wedding-photography-2/&gbv=1&sei=HCj6UIjGFKrKiALJr4GIAQ&ct=clnk

« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 03:12:13 PM by ErikKaffehr » Logged

FredBGG
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« Reply #59 on: January 19, 2013, 08:44:50 PM »
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Hi,

An observation is that author compares a Nikon D700 with an IQ 140. The D700 is essentially a low resolution semipro camera oriented at high ISO, while the IQ 140 is a pro camera oriented at low ISO. Comparing MFD with Nikon D600/D800 or Sony Alpha 99 would be much more relevant.
Best regards
Erik

Not to mention that the D700 is discontinued and not based on current Sony/Nikon sensors.
It's also worth noting that the new generation 40mp and 60mp Phase One backs use the same sensors as their older P series backs.

In a similar time frame Nikon went from 12MP (D700) with AA filter to 36MP (d800 and d800e) with and without AA filter in one generation.

Canon went from the 5d II to the 5d III. MP stayed pretty much the same (still a good 20+ megapixels), but went from a modest 9 focus points to 61 focus points. Phase one is still stuck with poorly defined 3 focus points that are in the center of the screen. Substantially very little change from the DF to the DF+.


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