Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: NEC Monitor Software  (Read 994 times)
Robert Boire
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


WWW
« on: January 15, 2013, 05:54:39 PM »
ReplyReply

Hello,

I am thinking of upgrading my monitor and am thinking of either the NEC PA 231, P241 or PA 241.

I am unclear on the distinction between the MultiProfiler software that comes with the monitor and Spectraview. From what I can tell from the user guide, MultiProfiler lets the user manage factory supplied profiles but does not support creating a specific profile? Did I get that right? If not what does MultiProfiler actually do?

Do I need Spectraview to create profiles for the monitor if I am using a 3rd party hardware?

Also are there any other monitors (preferably wide-gamut) worth looking at that do not require proprietary software?

I appreciate any help.
Logged

Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 776



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2013, 10:43:52 PM »
ReplyReply

My advice, for whatever it is worth, buy the NEC with the hardware/software bundle.  it works great. Zero hassels.  Great color.

I have a pa271 and a 2690.  Both run Spectraview. 
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
Robert Boire
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2013, 07:57:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks, appreciate the response. But it does not really answer the question about the function of MultiProfiler vs Spectraview
Logged

Wayne Fox
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 2928



WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2013, 12:18:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Spectraview does more than create a profile when you calibrate an NEC display.  One of the advantages of the NEC is most of the color controls are the display itself.  While Spectraview does create a profile that is used it's just a small part of the overall adjustment, and you can't just "switch" profiles and see the difference.  When you change settings with Spectraview you will see the display go through a serious of adjustments, all independent of the profile.

I tried mulitprofiler but found spectraview gives me a better profile and more control. Since that's the reason I bought the display I wanted as much control and accuracy as I could get.  I have more than one setting (ex.  sRGB, 6500 at 160 cd/m2 for web browsing, Full spectrum with custom white point and 118 cd/m2 to match my printer)and can switch in a few seconds.


Logged

digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9225



WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2013, 03:37:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks, appreciate the response. But it does not really answer the question about the function of MultiProfiler vs Spectraview

SpectraView uses an instrument to conduct the process, MultiProfiler doesn't. It accesses some data of measurements done by NEC using a very high end spectroradiometer and then it updates itself based on display aging and such. You'll probably have more control in the end, using the SpectraView and instrument approach but you're not forced to do so.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Robert Boire
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 06:44:19 PM »
ReplyReply

It accesses some data of measurements done by NEC using a very high end spectroradiometer .

I understand I think. Out of curiosity does NEC measure each monitor that is built or just create a generic measurement for a particular model?
Logged

digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9225



WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2013, 06:50:31 PM »
ReplyReply

I understand I think. Out of curiosity does NEC measure each monitor that is built or just create a generic measurement for a particular model?

My understanding is each unit is measured.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad