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Author Topic: Fine Art Print Sizes  (Read 2614 times)
Mike Guilbault
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« on: January 18, 2013, 09:41:08 PM »
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Do you stick to the 'standard' photographic sizes like 8x10, 11x14, 16x20, 20x24, etc. or do you crop according to the image and produce custom sizes?
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Schewe
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2013, 12:36:50 AM »
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Yes...

Largely depends on the image. The image dictates the final crop size but I try to keep within certain sizes when possible. Sometimes it ain't possible, ya know? But I would personally NEVER let paper dimensions dictate the final image crop.
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bill t.
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 12:52:25 AM »
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Personally, I don't have two images with the same ratio of width to height.  But since I build my own frames it doesn't matter.

A minimally cropped 13 x 19 fits nicely centered in a standard 22 x 28 frame, if you like 4.5" of matte all around your print.

For pano sized prints, you're pretty much limited to 24 x 48 if you want to use ready mades.  Canvases look pretty nice in those, but of course with a 24" roll you would need to mount the canvas, or toss a lot of 36" roll to make a wrap.
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Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 09:56:33 PM »
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Yes...

Largely depends on the image. The image dictates the final crop size but I try to keep within certain sizes when possible. Sometimes it ain't possible, ya know? But I would personally NEVER let paper dimensions dictate the final image crop.

Nice to know.  That's how I feel as well.

Although I don't build my own frames, I can order them at wholesale for any dimension.  I looked at some pricing on stretcher bars for canvas, but for a few dollars more, my local framer can cut custom sizes AND stretch them for me. But if order in the bars in length and cut them myself, I may be better off.  I'll have to check the pricing. 

So, the next question would be, if you are providing non-standard sizes all the time, are you 'custom pricing' each image as well (because of the custom size) or does your pricing include a range of sizes, ie. up to 24" is one price, up to 36" is more, etc.
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 11:30:04 PM »
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Keep in mind that custom built stretcher bars will almost always be the non-adjustable type, put together like a regular, rigid picture frame rather than with the wedge-adjustable corners you get with most standard sized bars.   With the fixed bars the only long-term way to tighten a sagging canvas is for you to re-stretch and re-staple, whereas with the adjustable bars even your client can do the job quickly and easily.  That's part of the reason I prefer mounted canvases.

One the of the many ways to price your work is by area, + a constant fee.  For instance, $0.30 per square inch, plus a constant $100 regardless of size.  If you are selling to price sensitive retail markets in multiple venues, that will lend consistency to your pricing and keep all your vendors feeling they are on a level playing field, which is important.  It also allows your vendors to quote custom sized prices at the point of sale without having to track you down on the phone.  The "constant" part keeps you from being killed on small pieces, and it encourages your buyers to think big.  This runs against the meme of pricing your pieces individually by some abstract judgement of individual merit, which is perhaps a better plan if you are primarily interested in selling through galleries that are more than just gift shops.
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jferrari
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2013, 09:17:13 AM »
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I never crop a customer's image. On canvas, I always add the wrap to the existing image, mostly mirror wrap. All custom stretcher bars, cut to the nearest sixteenth of an inch, are made from take-offs after the print is coated.    - Jim
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No, I don't own one. But I have seen one on TV.
Justan
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2013, 10:36:40 AM »
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My works are all non standard sizes and about 75% are panos.

I price framed and coated canvas works at about $100 per lf. That said, I tend to round down. F’instance, if a work is 3’ or > but less than 4’ I’ll price it as a 3’ work.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 12:09:21 PM by Justan » Logged

Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2013, 08:47:35 PM »
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Bill... you need to write a book!  You have little jewels of wisdom spread throughout the forum and we (the rest of us) need you to consolidate it into something easier to read or search.  Wink

So, if I'm using stretcher bars, the keyed ones are better, but I'm restricted to their predetermined sizes.  I expect that most images could be cropped a little to come close enough to these sizes (usually 1" increments).  using the keyed stretchers is also a selling feature.   

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PeterAit
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2013, 09:59:49 AM »
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Do you stick to the 'standard' photographic sizes like 8x10, 11x14, 16x20, 20x24, etc. or do you crop according to the image and produce custom sizes?

Custom, definitely. For wraps, you are limited to the available bar sizes (unless you cut your own), but they typically come in 1 or at most 2 inch increments so you can get pretty close to the "ideal" crop. For traditional matted and framed prints, I standardize on 2 or 3 mat and frame sizes but each print gets a custom cut window.
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
elolaugesen
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« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2013, 11:06:21 AM »
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I work with many artists.  Every image except for canvas work is a different size.  Thus most of the images are different sizes.   
In the UK they use canvas sold in Inches and US sizes.  Yet all the stores sell frames mostly in the International sizes.  (Cm). 
I have been in galleries, gift shops and heard customers not buy because the end product would not fit a standard size frames, and did not want to go to a frame shop...  To expensive/takes too long/need it for a present tonight.

I now discuss size etc with all my clients(artists). Some of them now mark up the paper/canvas/plywood/vinyl/or what ever they find ----   so the printed image with mounts can fit into one of the  standard size frames.

Yes I crop some too but only with the artists permission.


Cheers.   Elo
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Graham Clark
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« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2013, 01:11:49 AM »
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I would recommend staying within the aspect ratio of the sensor, unless a creative composition within the image is desired. In still camera photography, the most common aspect ratios are 4:3, 3:2, and more recently being found in consumer cameras 16:9.
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Graham Clark  |  grahamclarkphoto.com
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