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Author Topic: Yellowstone NP trip  (Read 1698 times)
David S
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« on: January 21, 2013, 04:50:53 PM »
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Planning a major trip driving from London Ontario to Yellowstone NP and then on to Oregon and back.
Aiming for the last week of August to hit Yellowstone about Sept 2 or so.

Questions:
1) Should we delay the trip a bit or will the crowds mostly be gone? Perhaps a week in Yellowstone and 5 days in Grand Teton.

2) When I was in Estes Park, CO. for Rocky Mountain NP, I suffered mild to moderate altitude illness. Should I worry about the elevation in Yellowstone?

Thanks,

Dave S
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Andy Ilachinski
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2013, 05:48:30 PM »
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David,

My family and I took a trip to Grand Teton and Yellowstone around that time this year (indeed, we stopped by Estes Park on our way from Denver, as well).

If you've suffered elevation sickness at Estes (~7500 ft), do keep in mind that Yellowstone averages 8,000 feet (but goes down to about 5,000 feet in the north). Apart from that, it *is* a wonderful time of year to go; the crowds are always omnipresent, but less so than even a few weeks before late August; and the weather is usually sublime.

FYI: one of a few blog entries I wrote last year upon our return home (to northern VA):

http://tao-of-digital-photography.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-same-and-not-same.html
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ltphoto
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« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2013, 05:55:14 PM »
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If you wait a couple of more weeks, it will be even better. The crowds are non-existent by mid-September, and the Elk rut begins in mid to late September. Our favorite time of the year to drive up there is the last week of September, which we do almost every year.
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David S
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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2013, 07:33:03 AM »
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Thanks to you both.


Dave S
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Edward Mendes
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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2013, 05:41:52 PM »
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If you have the option of delaying the trip a bit I'd take advantage of doing so.  While conditions change from year-to-year the last week in September is generally a good bet for peak colors (or close to it) in Grand Teton National Park.  In addition that also marks rut season for Moose. 

The parks themselves aren't very busy during this time however lodging in Jackson (and Yellowstone) books up far in advance because guys like me schedule their workshops during the last week of September in Grand Teton.

Enjoy!
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Edward Mendes

Edward Mendes Photography - Fine Art Prints and Workshops
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PDobson
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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2013, 04:23:09 PM »
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One aspect of altitude sickness is that it's unpredictable.

I had a friend get sick on a trip to the High Sierra despite the fact that he was the most fit and lived at reasonable altitude. The other guy with us came from a desk job at sea level and had no problems.

You'll probably be fine, but you might get sick. Stack the odds in your favor by hydrating, taking it easy the first few days, and avoiding too much alcohol.

Phillip
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David S
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« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2013, 04:56:54 PM »
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So acting as if I were on a plane and somewhat unpressurised (spelling?) should help me avoid a repeat of past experience then. That is most helpful.

And I can re-arrange the trip to hit Yellowstone and Grand Teton in the third and fourth weeks of September.

Great and thanks again to all.

Dave S
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dmerger
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« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2013, 08:13:15 PM »
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Yellowstone = 3,472 square miles.  Grand Teton = 485 square miles.  Depending on how much hiking you plan to do, etc., you may want to consider a little more time in Yellowstone vs. Grand Teton.  There is plenty to see in both parks, however, so no matter how you split your time, you won’t see it all.  If you’re going to be mostly sightseeing near the roads, however, you may want to plan for a little more time in Yellowstone.

Delaying your trip is a good suggestion.  Both parks are spectacular. 
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Dean Erger
Les Sparks
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« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2013, 02:18:00 PM »
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Dry conditions and low water levels can be an issue in Yellowstone in September. My wife and I visited in 2008 in September and found that many of the hot springs and mud pots etc. were nearly dry and not very pretty (at least compared to a previous visit in June 1999). But the colors were nice and it was still a great visit. Crowds were not bad at all.
Grand Tetons was really nice. Relatively small crowds even at popular places at sunset and sunrise. For example, we pretty much had Schwabacher Landing all to ourselves. One other couple was hiking around but that was it.
You'll have a great time.
Les
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David S
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2013, 06:52:31 AM »
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Many thanks to all. Will try and see how we can re-arrange the plans to take into account the suggestions.

Dave S
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