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Author Topic: Interesting article on shooting film  (Read 1052 times)
Emilmedia
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« on: January 22, 2013, 06:03:39 AM »
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How do you work on your shoots?

http://fstoppers.com/fashion-photographer-norman-jean-roy-says-digital-is-killing-fashion-photography


Also Can you see theese lamps he has on this shot, where can i get those and what are they called?
http://fstoppers.com/fashion-photographer-norman-jean-roy-says-digital-is-killing-fashion-photography/linda-evangelista-vanity-fair-spain-september-2012-norm
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 08:24:16 AM »
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I think I'd take it further back than ten years; clients were only a 'present' problem towards the close of my calendar days, usually they stayed at home or, if they had to come along, went off and had fun whilst the girls and I worked  - also having fun. In fashion, it was very rarely that any were present - I just picked up the clothes, sometimes discussed a theme, but mostly it was a case of jumping into the car, or on a 'plane and heading out, or, if the budget sucked, staying in the studio.

It was one of the advantages of working mainly 35mm: no Polaroids. With one client, though he understood that Polas weren't on the menu via the Nikon, he did still want some idea of what I'd done during the day, so we did those SX(?) things with a separate camera where the pic peels out the front. I then masked the things off with tape to show the 2:3 format and that was it. In later shoots, he didn't need anything at all. It was great for several years, until one year he handed over the job to a guy much further down the company food chain, who forced me to use local models instead of the best the country could give (from London). Why? Because it let him tie the calendar in with some local mutts that did local PR for him. I rest my friggin' case: you can care more about the company than can your goddam client. It was my last production for them.

Oh well, sweet memories.

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 01:18:32 PM by Rob C » Logged

Gel
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« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2013, 11:27:12 AM »
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Film's a pain in the backside.

Love it, but it's a pain.
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Chris Giles Photography
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2013, 12:15:19 PM »
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Film's a pain in the backside.

Love it, but it's a pain.

Film is a pain when you don't have a budget.  When you have a budget for dip and dunk and contacts, color printing and/or high res scanning, its a joy.  All that time away from the computer is liberating. 

It gets to be a pain when you are suddenly a scanner operator, or you had temp issues with your home C41 kit, or there isn't enough light.  Then it sucks.  Even then, I find the results worth it.
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FredBGG
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2013, 04:23:00 AM »
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Emil.

Nice article... I agree with most of what Norman Jean Roy says.

Regarding you question on the lights. Those are Mole Richardson 10K also caller Tener Mole
by most gaffers. They produce beautiful light.

I have many old Mole Richardsons. 2K and 10K. I also like to use the 10K with a bulb adapter putting a 2k bulb into the
Tener. However keep in mind that the bulb you put into these types of lights makes a significant difference.



Top lamp is Osram
Bottom lamp is Ushio

The Osram has a denser filament and produces much cleaner light behind a fresnel lens.
The Osram has two rows of filaments that are offset so as to produce a nice solid source.
The Ushio on the other hand has far more separation in the filament so it appears as multiple light sources.
Through the fresnel lens the split up Ushio fillament results in banding on the shadows.

If I ever use these type of lights that are not mine I have my assistant open each unit up and check the bulb.
If the filaments are not compact I ask for other bulbs.

Elinchrom also made a great modeler called the SL35 Fresnel spot. It produces great light to.



I have also modified some ADB Fresnel TV spots so that I can put a Flash head in them.
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Emilmedia
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2013, 05:22:43 AM »
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Emil.

Nice article... I agree with most of what Norman Jean Roy says.

Regarding you question on the lights. Those are Mole Richardson 10K also caller Tener Mole
by most gaffers. They produce beautiful light.

I have many old Mole Richardsons. 2K and 10K. I also like to use the 10K with a bulb adapter putting a 2k bulb into the
Tener. However keep in mind that the bulb you put into these types of lights makes a significant difference.



Top lamp is Osram
Bottom lamp is Ushio

The Osram has a denser filament and produces much cleaner light behind a fresnel lens.
The Osram has two rows of filaments that are offset so as to produce a nice solid source.
The Ushio on the other hand has far more separation in the filament so it appears as multiple light sources.
Through the fresnel lens the split up Ushio fillament results in banding on the shadows.

If I ever use these type of lights that are not mine I have my assistant open each unit up and check the bulb.
If the filaments are not compact I ask for other bulbs.

Elinchrom also made a great modeler called the SL35 Fresnel spot. It produces great light to.



I have also modified some ADB Fresnel TV spots so that I can put a Flash head in them.

Do you know where I can find theese?
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